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Old 08-20-2012, 10:51 PM   #1
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Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall


So I am in the process of trying to widen a doorway for a 36" door. I've done alot of reading on the subject already but it seems everything I read was for a "normal" built house. Needless to say this house has been added on ATLEAST 3 times from what we can tell maybe more.

But anyways. I opened up the doorway and the pictures below are what I found. It is a supporting wall. I am not sure what the proper way to frame/cut this out would be since it seems very confusing. There is 1 layer of 1x4ish type wood that is slotted together as you can see on the last picture. Then that is attached to what looks like a 4x4 type post followed by the opposite wall which starts with a piece of paneling (atleast thats what it looks like) but it's attached to what looks almost like drywall about 1/4" thick. then some sort of gritty cement type material with tons of nails every which way and then some kind of slotted wall attached to the 4x4 piece of wood in the middle.

I'm thinking the correct way would be to start with cutting away the 1x4 type slotted stuff and pulling that off to see what is behind there then working my way on the other side. Then as far as the framing aspect goes im not fully sure what way to support it or what to use to support the rough opening for the door. Any help would be appreciated as I am really confused
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Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall-100_6016.jpg   Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall-100_6017.jpg   Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall-100_6018.jpg   Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall-100_6023.jpg  
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:20 PM   #2
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Rough Opening on a Supporting Wall


Are you trying to install a prehung 36 or just widen the opening?
That's nothing but old plaster and lath with sheetrock over it.

What makes you think it's a supporting wall?
You need to be look at what's above that area, and what's under it to figure that out.

Is there a double top plate on that wall or just one?

The only tricky part I see is having to cut out that old paneling where it's ran up behind those ceiling tiles, I'd use my Toe Kick saw. That way I could cut right at the ceeiling to wall line with out hurting the ceiling.
It's going to have to be cut out and removed in order to fit a new wider header over the opening.

With that wall being so thick you have to make a choise. Order a door with a wider jamb or add jamb extentions.

I would order flat jamb doors and add your own trim. Make sure to set the door if your making your own extention so the hindge is sitting flush with the wall and add your extention on the other side of the jamb so the hinge has room to swing.
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