Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-16-2010, 03:22 PM   #1
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


HI;

I'm not sure if I'll be able to afford to build my deck this year or not, but I wanted to draw it out so I know what it will cost.

Could you please let me know how my drawing looks?

I am trying to have the least number of posts I can, so I don't have to disturb any more tree roots than I have to. I of course want to make sure it is built properly though.

I was only going to use 3 posts on the outside at 12' and that is why I spected Glam for that outside board. I wasn't sure if this would be an acceptable solution or not, so I added in 2 more posts, so it is posts at 6'.

Rough Deck Plans Review-deck-plans.jpg

Planing on using joist hangers on both ends of the 2x12x12 boards. I would put a row of blocking in the center at 6'.

The slope of the ground away from the house isn't illustrated very well, but it is not very significant, even at 12', the area has been made fairly level since most of it is currently a patio.

Thanks very much,

Jamie

jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2010, 03:47 PM   #2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


This should get you started, notice the rim and ledger sizes: http://www.lancova.com/deckinfo.pdf

Be safe, Gary

__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2010, 03:59 PM   #3
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
This should get you started, notice the rim and ledger sizes: http://www.lancova.com/deckinfo.pdf

Be safe, Gary
The thing that jumps out at me, which I knew I had draw in differently is that I was supporting the deck from the Rim Joist (glam) (rim joist attached to posts), instead of from a beam on top of posts, as is shown in the file you sent.

The problem is that I am building very close to the ground, and there isn't room for posts with a beam on top of them. This is very very close to ground level. Even if the posts were at ground level, I think a 4x4 beam would be too high.

I really can't excavate this area (i.e. so the beam would be below the current grade, and just stick up a couple inches) without causing problems for my trees.

Are there any other options since I am so close to the ground?

Thanks

Jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2010, 04:20 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


Hi Jamie,

I'm not sure what they're called, but Home Depot, and others I'm sure, sell concrete pyramidal shaped blocks with an X in the top for placement of stringers. They're about 9" tall. You could pour some footings under the deck and set these on top. I've used them to set two structures on in my yard, and they work great. Mine are just on the ground, but yours should be on poured footings which extend below your frostline.
woodywrkng is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to woodywrkng For This Useful Post:
jamiedolan (07-16-2010)
Old 07-16-2010, 04:35 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


You sink sonotubes and set the top level so the double rim joist rests on the Simpson standoffs.
Ron
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ron6519 For This Useful Post:
jamiedolan (07-16-2010)
Old 07-17-2010, 04:06 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


If your local Building Department allows floating decks, go that route. If not, use the doubled rib as your beam resting on the brackets set in sono's below frost line as others said. It depends on location with the frost line and LOCAL B.D. control that. Some areas require a ledger to the house, some don't. http://books.google.com/books?id=1gg...num=3#PPA31,M1

I would talk to an aborist first before digging holes to see the impact on the trees. The drip line above establishes the feeder roots that should not be disturbed, compacted, or covered to allow water and air be supplied to the tree. http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/Garden/02926.html

Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2010, 05:25 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


GBR:

If Jamie goes with a floating deck, he really shouldn't have it attached to the house, as shown in his drawing. If he simply floated the whole deck, without attaching it to the house, that would be fine, and really not too difficult, using the concrete pyramidal pier things. Additionally, it would cause minimal damage to the tree roots.
woodywrkng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2010, 07:07 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


As this is so close to the ground, why would you even bother with a wood deck? Decks require constant upkeep. They start deteriorating as soon as they are built.
I would(and did) build a bluestone patio.
I've built any decks in my life, but never one on property I've owned.
Ron
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 12:26 AM   #9
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
As this is so close to the ground, why would you even bother with a wood deck? Decks require constant upkeep. They start deteriorating as soon as they are built.
I would(and did) build a bluestone patio.
I've built any decks in my life, but never one on property I've owned.
Ron
Stones or stamped concrete look great, but they completely block out water and oxygen to the tree roots. It would be a bad place to cover up 300 sqft with a surface that would deprive the roots of water and air.

Jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 12:40 AM   #10
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
If your local Building Department allows floating decks, go that route. If not, use the doubled rib as your beam resting on the brackets set in sono's below frost line as others said. It depends on location with the frost line and LOCAL B.D. control that. Some areas require a ledger to the house, some don't. http://books.google.com/books?id=1gg...num=3#PPA31,M1

I would talk to an aborist first before digging holes to see the impact on the trees. The drip line above establishes the feeder roots that should not be disturbed, compacted, or covered to allow water and air be supplied to the tree. http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/Garden/02926.html

Be safe, Gary
I talked to the building inspector this morning at the farmers market. I should have asked him for details about this. I know that the city does not require a permit for decks less than 18" tall, however I am not sure what other requirements may still apply to their construction.

I had a ISA certified arborist out last summer. Some post holes / sonnet tubes will be fine, (they will be inside the drip line of a mature tree, but I was told the temporary damage from something like post holes heals very quickly, as long as cuts to the roots are clean) but he didn't want to see a large area like a solid stone / concrete patio that would block out all air and water. I think the decking will be fine since it still allows water and air to get to the roots.

The ground here is lots of hard clay on top of stone, and lots of it. They had to blast out the rocks for the basement with explosives when the house was build in 1963. Fence posts that I have put in about 2.5 feet down with concrete have been extremely solid. That's not really below the frost line though, we are suppose to be at 4' to be below the frost line, which can be extremely difficult to dig due to the rocks.

Is the floating deck better because it has more give if the level of the sonets fluctuates due to frost?

Thanks

Jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 12:51 AM   #11
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


how about pervious concrete?

You could still set stone or something similar and leave a wide joint in between for the run through.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 09:33 AM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


If I were in your shoes, and wanted a wood deck, but had a major problem installing footings, I would set the entire deck on the ground using those concrete pier blocks. I've done this in my own yard with a 12 foot square spa enclosure and a 8 x 12 garden cottage. The former has been in place since 1999 and the latter since 2004. Both are still perfectly level. The spa enclosure has 15 of those piers as I recall (due to the weight of a hot tub), and the cottage has 6. However, I'm not a pro, just a homeowner, so I could just be lucky thus far.
woodywrkng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 10:09 AM   #13
Framing Contractor
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Caldwell, NJ
Posts: 1,758
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Rough Deck Plans Review


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post


The problem is that I am building very close to the ground, and there isn't room for posts with a beam on top of them. This is very very close to ground level. Even if the posts were at ground level, I think a 4x4 beam would be too high.

I really can't excavate this area (i.e. so the beam would be below the current grade, and just stick up a couple inches) without causing problems for my trees.

Are there any other options since I am so close to the ground?

Thanks

Jamie
Jamie,

Why can't you install a flush beam and hang the joists?

__________________
Joe Carola
Joe Carola is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Deck Staining Nightmare steven994 Painting 6 04-06-2014 10:10 PM
Sanding rough PT deck boards houseinthewoods Painting 2 06-24-2010 07:27 AM
looking for good deck plans protools Landscaping & Lawn Care 9 03-09-2010 04:39 PM
Building a new deck....and creative uses of granite scrap in outdoor living space Rhizzlebop Building & Construction 9 05-15-2009 12:17 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.