Rotten Patio Posts - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-14-2009, 03:36 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


Recently my home went through an occupancy inspection. The inspector noticed that the bottom of the posts from the concrete patio to the roof were rotten. She said that the posts could be fixed without replacement. Any cost-friendly ideas? There are three wooden posts and just the bottoms are rotten.

Thanks!!!

Advertisement

herrellka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 05:24 PM   #2
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


Great question! I just joined DIY Chat Room to ask essentially the same question.

May I expand the question, please? At our house, one 4 x 4 post supporting a small roof (approx. 6' x12') over our back porch has rot at the bottom where the post rests on a concrete footing. Above about 4 inches, the wood seems solid.

Is it possible to cut back the rotted section of the post to good wood, and replace only that section by inserting a length of 4 x 4 and supporting it with wood "plates" connecting it the new section to the original post. Also, in replacing either the rotten section or the entire post, how should it be attached to the concrete?

Thank you.

EB

Advertisement

EB3551 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 06:32 PM   #3
Household Handyman
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, Ga.
Posts: 2,299
Rewards Points: 1,050
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


Neither of you mentioned which type wood your post are made of, and are they pressure treated? I hate the word "assume", so let's just say the "I bet" they are Pressure Treated Southern Yellow (or maybe white) Pine, which is fine. PT wood will rot if put in a place where it is exposed to lots of water. Concrete patios with the wood directly on the concrete is such an example. "Can the post be repaired in place"? YES, definitely, and I have done lots of them. Can a DIY do this task? YES, if the DIY takes the time to see how the post is load bearing and how to place the replacement piece back in properly. Would I replace a rotted section of post and use other pieces of wood to "sandwich" the new piece in--NEVER! I use a "tongue and groove" method. I understand that most DIY people may not have the equipment I have to do this, but a pencil, a straight-edge, and a good handsaw will make these cuts. I put the "tongue" on the replacement piece, the "groove" on the old post, and make this joint tight. Me-I like to put in at least two opposing stainless steel wood screws through the new joint, "just because", sink the heads in good also. Also remember to use some appropriate method of holding up the weight of the porch/roof/canopy/etc., just enough to do this work--SAFELY. I don't let the new wood touch the concrete either, too many ways out there to bring the wood up off of the concrete just enough for drainage and support. My 2˘ worth, David
Thurman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 09:52 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 855
Rewards Points: 526
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


before you put any wood back on the bottoms,,,,google concrete post piers,or some sort variation. They make the bottom of the post a few inches off the ground level which was making them 'wet' to start with!! I have seen them advertised,just dont know exact name!!
4just1don is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 10:52 AM   #5
Household Handyman
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, Ga.
Posts: 2,299
Rewards Points: 1,050
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


There are indeed pre-cast concrete piers for 4x4 post which will get the bottom of the post off of any surface. The one's I am familiar with have a wide footprint at the bottom to spread the load out over a larger area than the 4 x 4 post. IMO-these do not look to good for a post on a patio where the HO or guest will be seeing it when they are sitting on the patio. To use these for footers in areas which are not readily seen they are fine. There are also various metal, and lately some plastic plates made for post which are on patios, porches, etc., where they are seen often. Your finished project will only be as good as your imagination and supplies available in your area. Good Luck, David
Thurman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 12:41 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


Thank you for your detailed advice. I have no way to tell what type of wood was used for our porch roof support posts; the house was built in 1940-41, and the posts have always been painted. Our house is on Long Island, NY, and I believe that white pine was commonly used for construction in this area.
I now want to look carefully at the other two posts supporting the roof. They seem to be in good condition, but a little probing may reveal damage I've missed before.

Thank you. I have started to look for a carpenter to do the repair. It seems involve more safety considerations and carpentry skill than I have.
Thanks again.
EB
EB3551 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 11:29 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Mt Vernon, WA
Posts: 19
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Rotten Patio Posts


You can use adjustable pier pads. They have a threaded rod under the 4X4 with a nut on it. You turn the nut to move the post up or down. You can cut rot off the end of the post and adjust the pier pad up. Make sure you temp up the deck so it doesn't sag while you are working. A bottle jack works good for this. You can put a level on the deck and jack it to where you want it before you put the new pier pads in.

Another option is to pour cement pads under the posts. You can form up under the post as high as you need. Make sure you cut all the rot off before you do this. It will continue to grow if you don't. If you need to go higher than you want to form, you can use a SonoTube to any hight you need. It is a tube that you set where you want it and fill it with concrete. You can slide it up around the post and set it on solid ground and then pour concrete inside. http://www.sonotube.com/products/

I would not recommend adding 4 inches of wood to the bottom of the posts.

Hope this was helpful. Check out my website: http://www.youfixityourself.com

Advertisement

elarreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Will pay for patio advice! :) DirkPitt Landscaping & Lawn Care 6 07-31-2009 03:35 PM
Patio Cover Design Questions MrBill Building & Construction 3 06-09-2009 11:34 PM
Deck Posts replacement with load bearing columns from Pacific Columns, Inc Bruce Wilson Building & Construction 7 05-24-2009 03:55 PM
Locating posts for a patio cover roadkyng Building & Construction 2 03-27-2008 09:56 AM
New Patio & Weep Screed Woes DeepDish Building & Construction 3 12-03-2006 09:11 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts