Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-18-2010, 01:26 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 20
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Roof structure


This is a picture of the loft of a house I looked at for sale yesterday. Would anyone consider this brickwork repair under the beam to be a problem, or difficult to repair?
Name:  IMGP1440.JPG
Views: 148
Size:  35.8 KB

devonman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2010, 02:49 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,785
Rewards Points: 1,084
Default

Roof structure


At first glance, one might assume that the beam and bricks are associated, but I am not so sure that they are, aside from the fact that the bricks were knocked down to make room for the beam? But what is the purpose of the beam? Maybe I am not seeing something, but I think that you are going to want to post some more details, in order for anyone to offer any advice, and you might be better served to have an engineer look at it first hand.

DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2010, 02:53 PM   #3
Mod
 
kwikfishron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kansas (NCK)
Posts: 7,734
Rewards Points: 2,464
Default

Roof structure


Now thatís something you donít see every day.

Why is there a brick wall in your attic?
__________________
A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words
Especially In The DIY Chatroom
kwikfishron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2010, 06:57 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 20
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Roof structure


Thanks for the replies. There are actually 2 beams. The one you can see ends on top of the wall, and the next one starts on it. you can see the end of it next to the first one, but a bit lower down. The rafters seem to be resting on it. The other ends of the beams go into the brickwork at the end of the house.
devonman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2010, 09:44 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,785
Rewards Points: 1,084
Default

Roof structure


Okay. I had thought that might be the end of another beam, but wasn't sure. Regardless, it doesn't make sense, to me anyway, that those beams were set in place for the rafters to set on. That is one heck of a beam to have hoisted into place as a repair, but, on the other hand, if it was part of the original plan, then, based on the condition of the bricks, adequate support was not provided in the beginning, indicating that you may very well be looking at only a small part of a much larger issue. Do you think that the rafters are part of the original roof? Maybe the bricks and beams are of one era, and that the rafters were added later, but rather than removing the beams, they built over them? I don't know. Maybe it will make sense to someone else, but, in the mean time, I still think that more pictures are necessary, and that, again, you may very well want to contact an engineer in your area, and ask him or her to look at it.
DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2010, 10:45 AM   #6
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,276
Rewards Points: 2,130
Default

Roof structure


I agree with quikfishron, I have looked at several hundred houses and never seen anything quite like this. The beam is heavy enough to be a ridge beam, however it is not aligned with the ridge. The brick wall was apparently intended to support the beam, which would be common in mill buildings, but not in residential construction. Apparently the beam is not continuous over the brick wall, which is also odd. In fact, the whole arrangement is very odd.

Before I purchased that house, I would want a comprehensive, hands on structural analysis by a professional. As noted, with that kind of strange framing, who knows what else is up with the house. Either that or punt on the house, there are lots of others available.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Daniel Holzman For This Useful Post:
devonman (11-20-2010)
Old 11-19-2010, 03:19 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somerset, England
Posts: 680
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Roof structure


This was quite a common method used for terraced houses in the UK. You don't say where the house is. The purlins would be built into the party and gable walls to support the rafters and weight of the roof. Sometimes the weight from the purlins would be transferred from struts to a load bearing spine wall.
This one looks like a load bearing wall in the house is used to support the ends of the purlins so that shorter lengths can be used.
I would take a guess that this is the original build.
stuart45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 06:08 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 20
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Roof structure


Thanks for the advice Daniel, it does make sense to have a professional look at this and other issues.

devonman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need opinion on this roof profenx Roofing/Siding 14 10-12-2010 01:56 AM
Need some help with roof - NO clue what to do, or how.. :( AdrianVall Roofing/Siding 7 04-22-2010 09:32 PM
Putting a new flat roof on a 3600 sf home Jean3 Off Topic 2 04-09-2010 01:35 AM
Strange Winter Roof Leak Dragon Roofing/Siding 16 10-09-2009 07:06 PM
The moving Ice Dams after using a roof rake ?? Canufixit Roofing/Siding 9 02-05-2009 08:33 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.