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Old 12-23-2008, 09:18 AM   #1
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


Hi, would this be an acceptable way to frame a gable wall that has vaulted ceilings? This picture is looking from the inside - out. There is a 2x2 nailer for the drywall shown attached to the sides of the studs.

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Old 12-23-2008, 10:40 AM   #2
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


That'll work just fine. I'd go for a 2x4 nailer for the rock personally though.

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Old 12-23-2008, 10:50 AM   #3
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


thanks for the reply...
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Old 12-23-2008, 06:08 PM   #4
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


I'm going to clarify the lingo for you, because I just went through this with an historic home and it's all fresh in my mind.

What you depicted there is called a rake wall, and you either drew it or found it from a source, but regardless it's showing a platform framing style of construction. The rake wall on the gable end of the house supports the rake side of the roof (as opposed to a soffit).

I need you to picture this in your mind. That wall encloses a space in your home, either a room or the attic. If this is a space with vaulted ceilings, then picture the wall starting at the lower floor and going all the way up to the roof joist, which is in your illustration. In a platform style framing, you should see or have a double top plate going all the way around the house, at the elevation of the wall-to-soffit boundary. (That's where your ceiling/attic floor joists sit, as well as the roof joists.) You show a bottom plate in the illustration. If you showed a double plate and then the wall studs below, you'd have a complete depiction of the wall framing for platform style, from the floor below up to your vaulted space, including the double plate.

My recent situation involved a ceiling that he wanted to open up on an addition to an historic home. The framing was period (=old). His vaulted ceiling didn't go all the way up, but it did protrude into the attic a fair way. I was called in to look at the framing and make sure everything was legit. I recommended that, since there was no double plate to be found on the wall, some sort of fire stop be incorporated, otherwise a fire could travel basically from the basement to new attic crawl space unobstructed. I recommended 2x4 fire blocking to create the fire stop.

So if you find no double top plate, or no sort of fire stop, I'd recommend that you work that in to the plan.

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Old 12-23-2008, 08:45 PM   #5
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


sorry if I wasn't very clear in my post...

this wall depiction shows a section of wall on a 2nd story. this wall will rest on top of 3/4" subfloor, 2x8 rim joist, and double top plate of the 1st story wall. based on that, it should satisfy the fire stop requirements...right?
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Old 12-23-2008, 09:54 PM   #6
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is this the right way to frame a gable w/ vaulted ceiling?


Check the local code requirements. Each code has its own interpretation of the need for fire blocking between floors, and between the top story and the roof or attic, etc. Sometimes there is a max interval of 10 feet between fire blocking in any direction, sometimes insulation counts, sometimes not. So sometimes if you had a 14 ft by 14 ft wall, you'd need fire blocking:

running horizontally at the floor
running horizontally at the ceiling
running horizontally at (max) the 10 foot elevation
running vertically very 10 feet (max)

The codes all differ. You'd have to check to be sure. We see a lot of hack electricians get busted for not fire stopping their penetrations, so see what the requirements are there, also. We keep a box of Hilti FS-One in stock at all times.

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