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Old 03-26-2009, 02:47 AM   #1
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Request help with Deck


Hello All,

I am designing and building a 400 sqft deck. In pouring the footings, I made a mistake in that the footings are level with grade. The total height of the deck is 21 inch and the footing is a 2x2 by 18 inch deep.

I realized that I need to raise the footing by 2 inch or so only later by which time it was too late. I have also inserted the J bolt.

The problem I now have is when it rains, the water puddles around the J bolt and the post base. Even though the bolt and the base are galvanized, my feeling is that eventually they will corrode and cause trouble,

How do I fix this problem ? Cauking, pour more concrete and build a pyramid around the post base ?

I am trying to think up with all kinds of solutions.

Other idea that I was thinking of was to lay pressure treated plywood over the joist instead of regular deck planks and then install the VIFAH deck tiles on top of the plywood. I was thinking 3/4 inch pressure treated plywood. This will keep most of the water away from under the deck. Is this a good idea ?

Please help !! I have finished framing and need to take one route or the other to finish the deck.

thanks

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Old 03-26-2009, 05:04 AM   #2
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Request help with Deck


The plywood idea is worse then having the water puddle around the connectors. The water will stand on the plywood and rot the wood.
Why can't you just ,"cap" the offending low footings to keep the water from pooling?
Ron

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Old 03-26-2009, 05:16 AM   #3
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Request help with Deck


your idea of adding a bit more concrete seems logical.

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Old 03-26-2009, 06:19 AM   #4
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There are precast footings about 12" high but they will probably add too much height. You could cut some 4" solid cement blocks to add on top of the footings.
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Old 03-26-2009, 02:17 PM   #5
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Make sure your dirt grade slopes away from the house, as per code. You don't want water collecting under the deck- mold, mildew, critters, or fish? Plus it will rot out prematurely.
Simpson has an elevated post base, 1" up, you could pour a concrete cap in place to get 1" of fall for your pier top.
Or a thicken nut (bolt extender), and threaded rod, galvanized, to get the base up higher. Be safe, GBAR
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