DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Replacing non-load-bearing wall with header (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/replacing-non-load-bearing-wall-header-163097/)

peterrodick 11-12-2012 03:49 PM

Replacing non-load-bearing wall with header
 
As part of a kitchen renovation, we are reducing an non-load-bearing wall to a half wall. However, though this is not a structural wall, there is a 2nd-floor wall above it, so it will still require a header just to support the weight of the plaster above. I've discussed my plans with my building inspector, and he's given me the blessing to commence, but I have one question:

Can I simply remove the studs from the existing wall for the time required to install the new header (presumably just a couple minutes), or do I need to leave support in place at all times? If the latter, how should I temporarily support the wall? I understand that if I were replacing a load-bearing wall (perpendicular to the joists), I'd build a temporary wall for support; but as this runs parallel to the joists, it seems that a temporary wall would do little to support the wall above.

Thanks for the advice.

gregzoll 11-12-2012 04:02 PM

If it is not a load bearing wall, what makes you think that you need a header? The Plaster or Gypsum walls are not that much in weight. How long is this wall that you are taking down, and can you post a floor plan, along with the direction that the floor joists run on the second floor.

CanAmGuy 11-13-2012 04:05 PM

I agree with Gregzoll.. If it's non-load bearing, you don't need a "header". non-load bearing partitions should not be taking any bearing of the floor above, and should be independent of the floor system. The second floor wall should be supported by the floor system. Is that not the case? just trying to understand the scenario to better comment.

tony.g 11-13-2012 05:22 PM

Is your 2nd floor wall running directly above the lower wall (ie in the same vertical plane) or is it running perpendicular to the lower wall?
If its in the same vertical plane, then is it supported by your lower wall, or off bridging pieces between adjacent joists, within the depth of the floor.

hand drive 11-13-2012 10:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peterrodick (Post 1050503)
As part of a kitchen renovation, we are reducing an non-load-bearing wall to a half wall. However, though this is not a structural wall, there is a 2nd-floor wall above it, so it will still require a header just to support the weight of the plaster above. I've discussed my plans with my building inspector, and he's given me the blessing to commence, but I have one question:

Can I simply remove the studs from the existing wall for the time required to install the new header (presumably just a couple minutes), or do I need to leave support in place at all times? If the latter, how should I temporarily support the wall? I understand that if I were replacing a load-bearing wall (perpendicular to the joists), I'd build a temporary wall for support; but as this runs parallel to the joists, it seems that a temporary wall would do little to support the wall above.

Thanks for the advice.

In the second floor floor system check for a double floor joist under the 2nd floor wall and in between the first floor wall. there will most likely not be a double joist there, maybe just a single joist but look for a joist under the upper wall. the upper wall also could have been built on top of the subflooring in between the joists and the lower wall could be blocked up to the second floor subflooring to catch the weight of the upper wall. Do the first floor, floor joists go in the same direction as the second floor,floor joists?

how far along are you in demo, plaster torn down from lower wall- do you have access to the framing between floors etc...?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:19 PM.