Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-22-2013, 02:40 AM   #1
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 796
Rewards Points: 530
Default

Repairing water rot


I have some window sills that have water rot due to lack of maintenance. I've been reading about repairing water rot by digging out the rotted wood, apply a fungicide to stop the rot, applying a wood hardener and then filling with Bondo or an epoxy product.

QUESTIONS:

1. What's a good fungicide to use? Brand names would be helpful.

2. Any recommendations for a wood hardener?

3. Will automotive Bondo work to fill out the rotted areas? I don't know if it will expand/contract like the wood will. If not, what should I use instead?

Thanks,
HRG

Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 06:35 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: atl & hilton head
Posts: 3,294
Rewards Points: 2,170
Default

Repairing water rot


chlorox,,, west epoxy system work'd on sailboat

stadry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 07:17 AM   #3
Master General ReEngineer
 
Bondo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chaumont River, Ny.
Posts: 3,683
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Repairing water rot


Quote:
1. What's a good fungicide to use? Brand names would be helpful.
Ayuh,.... automotive Antifreeze....
Bondo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 07:26 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,997
Rewards Points: 3,110
Default

Repairing water rot


Got a picture?
Why not new windows and never have to deal with it again?
I just hate playing wack a mole with old wooden windows.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 11:21 AM   #5
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,863
Rewards Points: 2,374
Default

Repairing water rot


Where's the rot---I rebuild windows frequently---never used filler--always cut out bad section and replaced with new wood----
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to oh'mike For This Useful Post:
kwikfishron (01-23-2013)
Old 01-22-2013, 01:15 PM   #6
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 796
Rewards Points: 530
Default

Repairing water rot


Thanks guys. I'll follow the advice to just replace the window frames. A lot more work but while further researching the filler method, I read a post elsewhere where the guy filled the rot only to return 2 years later to find about an inch or two of rot around the filled area.

HRG
Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 05:04 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,997
Rewards Points: 3,110
Default

Repairing water rot


Believe it not in a lot of cases it's not going to take much longer to replace them.
The time spend digging it out, injecting the hardner, waiting for it to dry, applying the filler, sanding, priming, two coats of paint all take time.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 05:40 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Southeast Wisconsin
Posts: 80
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Repairing water rot


Some may think this overkill, but when I replace exterior wood trim these days, I typically go with cedar or PVC for things like sills and the trim that contacts the sills. Having lived in my house for almost 30 years and experienced rot in new wood repairs I've done in the past, I've become very leery of using new pine in these applications. I will also prime the cedar on all sides before installing.
One problem with cedar though is it sometimes comes rather wet. You want to try to find dry stuff, or buy it in advance and put it somewhere where it can dry out.

That said, I have used filler for exterior repairs with good results. I don't think sills are the best application for that though. Plus, I think they stopped selling the wood hardener/stabilizer I used to get. It was some really toxic stuff.
wrongdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 09:32 PM   #9
AHH, SPANS!!!
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Durham NC
Posts: 1,682
Rewards Points: 1,028
Default

Repairing water rot


Quote:
Originally Posted by Homerepairguy View Post
Thanks guys. I'll follow the advice to just replace the window frames. A lot more work but while further researching the filler method, I read a post elsewhere where the guy filled the rot only to return 2 years later to find about an inch or two of rot around the filled area.

HRG
do you mean window sills? The piece that the window sash sits on with a 15 degree slope usually and it comes in two parts, sill and sill nosing.
If you dig into the the wood rot and the spot gets bigger than a golf ball consider replacing it with a new cpvc window sill. It will help to know the anatomy of a window unit before attempting to extract the rotten one, lots of hidden nails that need cutting .

When was the house built? I'm currently replacing 3 1/2" by 7 1/2" window sills on an historical home, 4 more to replace up on the cupola and they are done. I have melted my sawz all getting the old sills out and I've got the extra heavy duty version sawz all tools,tools
hand drive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 03:44 PM   #10
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 796
Rewards Points: 530
Default

Repairing water rot


Quote:
Originally Posted by hand drive View Post
do you mean window sills? The piece that the window sash sits on with a 15 degree slope usually and it comes in two parts, sill and sill nosing.
If you dig into the the wood rot and the spot gets bigger than a golf ball consider replacing it with a new cpvc window sill. It will help to know the anatomy of a window unit before attempting to extract the rotten one, lots of hidden nails that need cutting .

When was the house built? I'm currently replacing 3 1/2" by 7 1/2" window sills on an historical home, 4 more to replace up on the cupola and they are done. I have melted my sawz all getting the old sills out and I've got the extra heavy duty version sawz all tools,tools
Yes, the major rot is in the bottom window sills right where the vertical frames attach, with some rot at the bottom of the vertical frames. It appears that the joints of the verticals with the sill sucked water due to capillary action and was the root cause of the water rot. The areas of the bottom sill between the vertical frames don't have water rot.

I'm very familar with how the frames were built since I worked as a carpenter for 2 years and assembled milled frames on site and installed them. It would take some work with nail pullers to remove the window frames so I'll look into using my Sawzall for cutting the nails holding the frame to the wall instead.

I'll check out the cpvc window sills and see if there are models suitable for our windows. If I end up making wooden sills, when I assemble the new window frames, I'm thinking about using liquid wood hardener on all of the joints prior to assembly to prevent the capillary action from starting up rot again.

What do all of you think about ways to prevent capillary action at vertical to sill joints from inducing water rot?

Thanks,
HRG

Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water Pressure issues after repairing main water line. Cleve99 Plumbing 2 01-26-2011 07:13 PM
Cold water is warm - hot water leak under slab? Homerepairguy Plumbing 9 10-13-2010 08:17 PM
Oil fired furnace and hot water heater question steveinpa Plumbing 3 08-10-2010 08:42 AM
How Do I Properly Shock Chlorinate a Water Softner classicflytyer Plumbing 5 07-14-2009 12:15 AM
Low Hot Water Pressure btennant Plumbing 4 12-09-2008 09:31 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.