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Old 05-21-2013, 12:33 AM   #1
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Repair damaged roof trusses


I have a roof truss (A Frame) on one end of it was damaged by previous water leak. Basically a portion of the 2x6 rafter was rotted.

Here is an illustration. The portion of the rafter that is tied to the concrete wall is rotted, and extends to part of the roof overhang.



From this picture you can see how badly the damage is.



When the previous owner replaced the damaged portion of the roof, the roofing contractor put in a piece of 2x6 on one side of it (not the whole length of the rafter, just the damaged portion plus 2' on each end), here is a view of that 2x6 on the other side.



They drive a few nails from the 2x6 into the damaged wood.

Now, since I have the ceiling down, I decided to look closer and see how badly damaged the wood is. I was able to pull off fibers with my own bare hand, and basically this is why you see almost nothing on the top portion of that rafter.

The nails that was driven from the 2x6 into the rotted portion, so now those nails are attached to nothing but air.

So now, I am thinking while I cannot replace that whole member - not without taking off the roof and ripping the trusses joints apart. What I would like to do, is to apply some filler material on the top side of that damaged rafter. Then I would like to cut a piece of large triangular plywood and put that on the other side of the trusses. Then I will put 3/8" bolts through the 2x6, the damaged 2x4 in the middle, and the piece of plywood, and secure with nuts from both ends.

I think that would work. Better than just the 2x6 itself loosely attached to the damaged 2x4.

Question is what filler materials can I use. I have worked with epoxy filler before, and works pretty well if you can pour or inject into a close void and let it sit. In my situation the space is so tight and the member slopes down I don't think epoxies would work. I need something that would cure into something strong but can be applied such that it can be forced into cavities and voids with a putty knife, something with the consistency of tooth paste may be good.

Any suggestions?

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Old 05-21-2013, 12:50 AM   #2
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Repair damaged roof trusses


Sister a board on both sides, bolt em together be done. You are overthinking it.

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Old 05-21-2013, 01:39 AM   #3
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Repair damaged roof trusses


Make them as long as you can.
Even use adhesive and screws/nails, or bolts.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:54 AM   #4
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Repair damaged roof trusses


GOOGLE: "Wood Rot Injection". There is a lot of material. Here is only one...

http://www.rotdoctor.com/epoxy/epoxyguide.html
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:01 PM   #5
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Repair damaged roof trusses


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Originally Posted by michaelcherr View Post
Sister a board on both sides, bolt em together be done. You are overthinking it.
That's what I was going to do. However there is too much damage. The worst part of it, as you can see the wood on top is all gone, and the wood below are not 100% solid wood, more like cottage cheese wood.

If I just sister both sides and bolt them together I am afraid in the weakest spot the wood would just crumble.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:10 PM   #6
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Repair damaged roof trusses


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Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
GOOGLE: "Wood Rot Injection". There is a lot of material. Here is only one...

http://www.rotdoctor.com/epoxy/epoxyguide.html
I have used these epoxy products before and they do work. However the wood member needs to be positioned a certain way for these liquid epoxy resin to do it's work.

In other words, let's say you have a horizontal beam with rot. What you can do is to use plywood to sister both sides of the beam, and seal the bottom. You can then mix the epoxy resin, drill a hole on top, pour the resin into the hole. The epoxy is like a honey consistency and it will seek gravity and fill up the voids inside. If you have a nail hole at the bottom then you have a mess, the resin will drip and you end up wasting a lot of very expensive epoxy.

In my case, the beam is sloped at a 30 degree. The top portion of this beam is gone. The bottom is like cottage cheese. If I sister a board on either side of the damaged board, and drill a hole to inject the epoxy, yes it will find it's way to the bottom but as it fill up it will leak out from the top sloped edge because there is no way to seal that edge.

This one is a real nightmare.
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Old 05-21-2013, 11:51 PM   #7
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Repair damaged roof trusses


Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicuse View Post
I have used these epoxy products before and they do work. However the wood member needs to be positioned a certain way for these liquid epoxy resin to do it's work.

In other words, let's say you have a horizontal beam with rot. What you can do is to use plywood to sister both sides of the beam, and seal the bottom. You can then mix the epoxy resin, drill a hole on top, pour the resin into the hole. The epoxy is like a honey consistency and it will seek gravity and fill up the voids inside. If you have a nail hole at the bottom then you have a mess, the resin will drip and you end up wasting a lot of very expensive epoxy.

In my case, the beam is sloped at a 30 degree. The top portion of this beam is gone. The bottom is like cottage cheese. If I sister a board on either side of the damaged board, and drill a hole to inject the epoxy, yes it will find it's way to the bottom but as it fill up it will leak out from the top sloped edge because there is no way to seal that edge.

This one is a real nightmare.
Put the boards in place with all edges, all the way around, sealed with a type of caulking that won't be affected by the epoxy. Smear the piece up good on all surfaces before putting it in place........ then let it set up a few days before doing the epoxy process.

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