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mwehnes 12-14-2006 10:56 AM

Remodeling Laundry Room/Closet on 2nd floor
 
I recently moved to Connecticut and purchased a new house. I'm considering performing the following upgrades to my 2nd floor laundry room. I would appreciate any feedback regarding my action items, especially if they are bad ideas or a code violation.

1. Currently, Hot and Cold pipes stick out the wall with 180 degree valves. I plan to install a Oatey 38530 washer machine inwall outlet box. This is to gain back precious inches of space in the closet for the washer.

2. Move the dryer vent. Currently the dryer vent runs through a hole in the wall into an adjacent closet and out the side of the house. It's an eye sore I rather do without. The plan is to install a Dryer Box in wall and run dryer vent between the studs in the wall up to the attic and vent out the house from there. Is there minimum diameter vent pipe that I should use?

3. Move the drain pipe for the washer. Currently the Hot and cold copper pipes and the drain pipe are seperated by a wall stud. I plan to cut a notch in the stud and angle my drain pipe 45 degrees over to the water pipes to allow it access to my outlet box (see step 1).

Does anyone see any problems with what I'm planning? I don't have a clue what is to code and what isn't.. #2 and 3 are the only items that have me a little worried.

Picture of my current laundry room..
http://www.mattwehnes.com/temp/laundryroom1.jpg

Christopher 12-14-2006 04:46 PM

mwehnes,

You've provided a great photo, thanks.
Quote:

I plan to install a Oatey 38530 washer machine inwall outlet box. This is to gain back precious inches of space in the closet for the washer
Based on what I see, it looks like your existing plumbing will allow the washer to go against the wall with only the diameter of the drain hose coming in between and this is always the case unless you somehow put it off to the side. The Oatey box is neat & tidy but doesn't necessarily improve anything. Some of those packages have crummy valves - restricting water flow.

As for the dryer, the builder got lazy with the receptacle. That surface mounted receptacle will likely push out the dryer.

The dryer vent - you've hit a real pet-peeve of mine. More often than not, the builder screws these up and then the appliance installer or home owner makes them worse by shoving a full 6-foot hose into a 3-foot connection, severely restricting air flow.

The minimum dryer vent size is 4" diameter. Any smaller will severely restrict air flow. The cross-section area of the 4" pipe is 12.6 sq. in. The cross-section area of a 3" pipe is 7 sq. in. a reduction of 44%.

The maximum dryer vent size is 4" diameter. Any larger will reduce the exhaust velocity resulting in lint collection in the vent pipe.

...Christopher

majakdragon 12-14-2006 05:17 PM

Even with an in wall box, the drain hose and the water supply hoses are still going to be between the washer and the wall. (they go into the box at the ends of the hoses)
With dryer vent pipe minimums being 4", the vent pipe will not fit inside a 2x4 studed wall. Also, you are increasing the chance for lint to clog more easily by going upwards to exhaust it. I can see where you want to go, but can't see a way of getting there. Good luck.

mwehnes 12-14-2006 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Christopher (Post 26909)
mwehnes,
Based on what I see, it looks like your existing plumbing will allow the washer to go against the wall with only the diameter of the drain hose coming in between and this is always the case unless you somehow put it off to the side.
...Christopher


Actually no.. I have Kenmore HE2 front loaders on 15.5 risers. The top of the washer and dryer come 2" above the plumbing valves. The Oatey box will give me back roughly 3-4" of space.

You mentioned some boxes come with bad/cheap valves.. Do you have any recomendations for quality ones?


Also, regarding my vent situation. Do you or anyone else reading this have experience with "Periscope Box vents"? If I can't run the vent up to the attic this thing could become a good work around for gaining space behind the dryer.. I only need inches.

Periscope box vent: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/prin...212272,00.html

Thank you both for the help!
Matt

Christopher 12-15-2006 03:04 AM

mwehnes,
Quote:

The Oatey box will give me back roughly 3-4" of space.

You mentioned some boxes come with bad/cheap valves.. Do you have any recommendations for quality ones?
The last time I installed a box was quite a while ago and I was able to swap out the valves with high quality off-the-shelf parts. Some of the newer boxes in use today seen too small for total flexibility. Perhaps someone else can steer you in the best direction here.

As for dryer venting I am discouraged to see that "Periscope Box" getting a This Old House endorsement. Dryers typically have a venting budget of 30 feet of straight smooth metal pipe. Each standard radius 90 degree ell consumes 5 feet of that budget and as you may have observed, the standard ell looks like a low restriction device (no abrupt direction change in air flow). The "Periscope Box" results in three high turbulence direction changes in air flow. I would budget at least 20 feet for that box. Each foot of flexible hose consumes 2 feet of budget so you can see the budget being rapidly consumed. Space permitting (such as attic areas), this ell should always be the first choice:
http://www.dryer-ell.com/

The second choice (standard adjustable elbow) is the bottom one shown here:
http://www.buildersbest.com/space_saving.htm

The third choice (space saving) is the top one shown here:
http://www.buildersbest.com/space_saving.htm

The "offset" elbows shown in the website above are superior to the "Periscope Box" but I still do not recommend them.

If you are going to redo the rough-in, I recommend what the better builders use, the "Recessed Dryer Vent Box":
http://www.dryerbox.com/
Note: this is for use when the vent is vertical up the wall. This will require the standard 2"x4" wall studs to be bumped out by adding 1"x2" providing 4 1/2" interior wall space for the 4" vent pipe.

The owner's manual that comes with your dryer should provide significant guidence in reviewing the venting budget. Be sure that the actual vent to the outside is the "big mouth" type.

I hope that the above helps...

...Christopher

rickharp 12-27-2006 06:15 PM

There is a 3.5" deep dryerbox but the hole or port is oval shaped, providing about a 6% loss in available area of pipe. if you add one firring strip to the wall studs, you'll provide 4.25" of depth, enough for the more popular model 425 dryerbox that has a round hole or port. Make sure you leave room for insulation if its an exterior wall.

I agree 100% that the periscopes are extremely ineffecient.

the companies website is super helpful and has many pictures and faq's about dryer venting. www.dryerbox.com good luck

mwehnes 02-09-2007 10:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I'm going to start on step 2 (outlined in the first post) tomorrow. I have two water pipes with 2 studs between them and my drain pipe. I want to move the water pipes to the same area as the drain pipe. This will allow me to install the washer box with all three items (hot, cold, & drain)

My plan is to cut out the 2 studs enough to run the water pipes across at 90 degrees. As long as I don't cut the studs in half, I should be okay doing so right? See attached picture for an (really bad) example.

I seem to remember hearing about "stud protectors" a while back. Basically sheet metal bent to cover the section of the stud where the pipes are running. Prevents someone in the future from hammering a nail into the pipes. Are these recommended for something like this?


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