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Old 03-24-2013, 06:08 AM   #1
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


Hello all.
Due to the soon-to-be arrival of a new baby girl, we have decided we need to do some remodeling to gain some more room. We will be turning the existing attached 2 car garage into a new living room and dining room (current dining room is just part of the kitchen, which we have never really cared for) and making the existing laundry room bigger (which is already in the garage). The existing living room will then become the master bedroom (put up one wall and build a closet), and a hall closet will be turned into a half bath. I will be doing the work myself.

It all seems fairly straightforward, nothing there I haven't done before. No load bearing walls will be touched, other then replacing some drywall after running some new electrical. Permits will be pulled and all inspections done.

My only real questions (at this time, anyway) pertains to the 2 rows of cinder block that runs around the perimeter of the garage. The sill plate is 2x6 material bolted to the top of the cinder block, and the walls are all 2x4. All pretty typical. I do not have the headroom available to build a new floor above that point, although that would be ideal as it would also make the new space level with the existing house. I do not want to raise the roof. That leaves me with using sleepers on the existing floor, which would leave most of that block exposed. So here's the 2 questions I have about that block:

How do I bury it in the new wall and cover it, so it is not seen when the drywall is finished? Am I stuck with framing in new walls inside the garage, losing almost a foot overall, and having walls that are close to 10 inches thick, or is there another way?

Should I continue that block through the existing openings (2 overhead doors and 2 entrance doors) that wont be there afterwards, or just frame it with wood? I don't see a reason not to run the two courses of block, especially since I already have it from a previous project.


Thanks for any help, and sorry about the lengthy description.

Bill

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Old 03-24-2013, 06:20 AM   #2
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


Most people fur out the wall to the thickness of the block----then insulate and drywall--

You will have a row of new blocks across the door---so plan on using 1/2 blocks to avoid that problem with your new wall.

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Old 03-24-2013, 06:23 AM   #3
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If you have enough headroom in the garage I would bring the floor up to create a heated plenum space below the floor, as your floor is going to be very cold out there. You simply stick EXPS down to the floor and up against the sill block, then you can frame in a new floor and cut registers in the floor where you want. Your garage floor is probably sloped so you will have to properly level the new floor.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:01 AM   #4
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


I have 2 overhead doors that are only about 2 feet apart, and there is block between them. There is also an entrance door about 3 feet from one of those overheads, and block between those as well. What would the point be in using half blocks to avoid the problem in those few areas, when the problem blocks are still there breaking it up? I would end up with a few small areas that are one thickness, and the rest a different thickness, with the larger block in between the smaller ones. Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see a point in using something that doesn't match what is existing?

As for heating the floor, radiant heat is already planned in the form of heated water in tubes between the sleepers. There isn't enough headroom to raise the floor without also raising the roof, so duct work in the floor is not an option. If I were willing to raise the roof and make everything level with the house, it would solve alot of issues, but I have no interest in doing that much work, or spending that much money.

The floor does have a slight slope, and it will be leveled with the sleepers.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:05 AM   #5
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


Also, if I were to just fur out the existing framing to match the depth of the blocks, how would I insulate the block before hanging drywall? Styrofoam sheets? Can those be glued to the block and then drywall glued to them? Granted, it would only be the bottom foot or so of the drywall sheet...
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:19 AM   #6
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Also, if I were to just fur out the existing framing to match the depth of the blocks, how would I insulate the block before hanging drywall? Styrofoam sheets? Can those be glued to the block and then drywall glued to them? Granted, it would only be the bottom foot or so of the drywall sheet...
Just pack out the studs far enough to run PT furring right down, then fill in between with EXPS blue board, or pink board. Is only a few inches on the bottom.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:34 AM   #7
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


Ah, gotcha. I thought he meant flush with the block. Going slightly past the edge of the block, just to fit some insulation in there, was my original thought, but the difference is enough that I might as well just re-frame it, and notch the bottom of the studs.

BTW, I just checked, and the difference between the original framing and the block (edge facing inside the garage of each) is 3.5 ", so enough to add another 2x4 framed wall on top of what is already there, to get to flush with the block. So I should add that 2nd 2x4 framed wall, and then furring strips from floor to ceiling, or re-frame with 2x6's notched around the block at the bottom, or some other configuration? How much space do I need between the block and the drywall for insulation?

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Old 03-24-2013, 08:42 AM   #8
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


If your going to be asking insulation questions you really need to go back and add your location to your profile, just go to Quick links to edit.
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:40 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithingell View Post

As for heating the floor, radiant heat is already planned in the form of heated water in tubes between the sleepers. There isn't enough headroom to raise the floor without also raising the roof, so duct work in the floor is not an option. If I were willing to raise the roof and make everything level with the house, it would solve alot of issues, but I have no interest in doing that much work, or spending that much money.

The floor does have a slight slope, and it will be leveled with the sleepers.
are you planning on installing some rigid insulation on top of the slab for your radiant heating?

What is the ceiling height in the garage?
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:23 AM   #10
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


No doubt I'm going to be the party pooper here....

Have you checked local codes? Many areas do not allow conversion of a garage to living space. And if they do, it needs to be permitted. And if you do all this without permits.....it's not pretty if you get caught....besides the fines, they may well make you take it all down.

If no restrictions....then just ignore me.

Oh....congrats on the baby....and it helps to put your location in your profile.
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:58 PM   #11
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Location is mid Michigan, so yes I do want it insulated well, heating bills are expensive enough. Yes, there will be rigid foam insulation between the sleepers and under the heating tubes. There will also be a 6 mil min. vapor barrier put down over the concrete slab before anything is built onto it. The ceiling height will allow for 7'7" headroom after installing the finished flooring and drywall on the ceiling.

As I stated in the first post, all work will be done to code, proper permits will be pulled, and inspections will be done. Remodeling an attached garage to living space is actually a very common thing to do in this area, and I am positive it is allowed.

My only real questions pertained to the block that sticks out 3.5 inches past the current framing, and if there was a better way to deal with that then I was already thinking, but there doesn't seem to be. I was hoping to come up with a way to not have to re-frame all 3 exterior walls, and could not think of any way around it myself. Since this is not my area of expertise, I decided to ask those that know more then I, but it seems theres no way around it.
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Old 03-24-2013, 11:34 PM   #12
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remodel attached 2 car garage to living space


Oh'Mike covered it already, you should be blocking in where the vehicle doors are to raise the new siding above the splash zone, 2" for stucco/brick/wood siding; eg."5. Wood siding, sheathing and wall framing on the exterior of a building having a clearance of less than 6 inches (152 mm) from the ground or less than 2 inches (51 mm) measured vertically from concrete steps, porch slabs, patio slabs, and similar horizontal surfaces exposed to the weather." From: http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...?bu2=undefined Leave the man door alone for code-required egress from the bedroom, and frame in a window above one/both of the vehicle doors to meet light/ventilation requirements; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...?bu2=undefined

If a gas appliance in the garage, plan on framing it in with its own air supply, possible fire-door. Egress path from new bedroom may require local restrictions (stairs, etc.) from bedroom to front door egress, check local AHJ as you have your own State code; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...?bu2=undefined

Gary
PS one reason to raise the floor is get above the CBU to eliminate the double walls or just furr 2" to meet code, if needed. They may require R-20, or 21 on the blocks to lose more room; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic..._11_par002.htm

http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...9_4_par004.htm

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