DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Refinishing Or Remodeling My Basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/refinishing-remodeling-my-basement-7074/)

Rifeman 03-12-2007 03:28 PM

Refinishing Or Remodeling My Basement
 
I am complately redoing my Basement and would like to know the best way to do it.

I plan to use 2x2 , 2x3 or 2x4 on my concrete block walls, which is better? I would like to insulate them but am agaist styrofoam for it does not breath and visqueen which also doed not breath. The reason is last year I had to take my Wood Paneling off my walls do to white sports on it, after takeing it off we found mold behind the strofoam.Do to the fact that it could not breath.

Now I plan to use eather 3/8" , 1/2" or 5/8" Drywall on the walls, I feel that 1/2" is the best way to go with the wall and the walls that surround the Furance would get 5/8". Now for the Ciling I am not sure of 3/8" or 1/2" Drywall. I would like to go with 1/2", what is the pro and con's on this?

Do you use Mold Rescisant GREEN BACK on the Walls or not?
What kind of insulation would you use?

I plan to put Canistal lighting and track lighting in.

Would you insulate the Cilling?

I do have a problem with the basement being very cool in the Winter like being 60 degrees where the furance is not running, but it will warm up when it does. I feel that there is a cold draft comming from the cilling.

concretemasonry 03-12-2007 03:51 PM

Refinishing Or Remodeling My Basement
 
Do not confuse the use of different building materials based on above grade experiences.

Below grade, you have a totally different situation with temperature differences and moisture.

All too often you will get different opinions based on where people live that may not have the same climate as you. On top of the "seat of the pants" local opinions you have the different bureaucratic or academic opions/requirements.

What ever you do make sure you fill the joint between the wall and floor with hydraulic cement (apply according to directions). Coat the walls with a proven waterproofer like Thoroseal. If everything is dry you can proceed.

Why use mold resistant "drywall" when the wood is not mold resistant? Prevent the moisture and then you don't have to worry.

Generally 1/2" drywall is good, but 5/8" around a furnace/utility room is a sensible choice from a safety and sound situation.

Do not waste your money insulating your ceiling. Insulate the rim joist area (above the foundation and between the joists). If you have a cold basement with drafts, you do not have enough warm air supply and cold air returns with a capacity greater than the heat supply.

Rifeman 03-12-2007 04:29 PM

Refishing and Remodeling Basement
 
There is one thing I did not say and that is that I live in Northwest Ohio.

I have 5 Hot Air Ducks in the Basement and do not have any Cold Air Ducks in the Basement, do you feel that I need a cold air duck in the Basement?

The door at the top of the stairway is open most of the time and when it is closed I have a 8"x10" vent at the top.




quote=concretemasonry;36759]Do not confuse the use of different building materials based on above grade experiences.

Below grade, you have a totally different situation with temperature differences and moisture.

All too often you will get different opinions based on where people live that may not have the same climate as you. On top of the "seat of the pants" local opinions you have the different bureaucratic or academic opions/requirements.

What ever you do make sure you fill the joint between the wall and floor with hydraulic cement (apply according to directions). Coat the walls with a proven waterproofer like Thoroseal. If everything is dry you can proceed.

Why use mold resistant "drywall" when the wood is not mold resistant? Prevent the moisture and then you don't have to worry.

Generally 1/2" drywall is good, but 5/8" around a furnace/utility room is a sensible choice from a safety and sound situation.

Do not waste your money insulating your ceiling. Insulate the rim joist area (above the foundation and between the joists). If you have a cold basement with drafts, you do not have enough warm air supply and cold air returns with a capacity greater than the heat supply.[/quote]

concretemasonry 03-12-2007 07:41 PM

Refinishing Or Remodeling My Basement
 
Warm air rises.

If you push warm air into the basement it will naturally go up.

If you do not have returns, you leave the cold air to accumulate in the basement and it will not get warm and the air will be old and stale.

Bottom line - if you don't remove air, there is not place for the warm air to go.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-12-2007 11:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)
I am complately redoing my Basement and would like to know the best way to do it.
I plan to use 2x2 , 2x3 or 2x4 on my concrete block walls, which is better?

First off, do not install walls directly to/against ....the concrete wall. Build the wall leaving about 2" of space between the concrete freezewall and your new framing. This allows moist 'air' circulation. (rather than trapping it)

To illustrate: Your skin is porous and it produces moisture (so does concrete) ....What happens when you leave a band-aid on for days and days?...wet, gross, yuck.
Instead, remove it, clean it, ... let 'AIR' get to it = good results ......makes sense...right?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)
I would like to insulate them but am agaist styrofoam for it does not breath and visqueen which also doed not breath. The reason is last year I had to take my Wood Paneling off my walls do to white sports on it, after takeing it off we found mold behind the strofoam.Do to the fact that it could not breath.

Again ....build in such a way as to leave air space for circulation.

FWIW- When we remodel basement areas, we use polysterene or rigid foam insulation in the lower 12" of the stud/wall cavities (We do many water related insurance repairs - and more & more insurance companies are requiring this as part of the repair procedure) The reason why we do this is, because, in the event, of a water intrusion situation (i.e.- Hot water tank burst, pipe burst, flood, etc...) there will be minimal moisture absorption in the wall materials. (Fiberglass batts will absorb and hold moisture. Rigid foam insulation will not)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)

Now I plan to use eather 3/8" , 1/2" or 5/8" Drywall on the walls, I feel that 1/2" is the best way to go with the wall and the walls that surround the Furance would get 5/8". Now for the Ciling I am not sure of 3/8" or 1/2" Drywall. I would like to go with 1/2", what is the pro and con's on this?

3/8" is not designed for on 16 O.C. 'bare framing' installation, it is used for 'laying over' other surfaces or over other sheetrock surfaces. You should absolutely use the 1/2" sheetrock.

5/8" sheetrock is not code required around furnaces in residential homes .... because it offers very little, if any, addititional protection, since you do not have an ' air-tight'/ 'zero draft' - sealed mechanical room - as is the case in commercial, industrial and multi-unit structures.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)

Do you use Mold Rescisant GREEN BACK on the Walls or not?
What kind of insulation would you use?

That depends on whether you have moisture issues in your basement. If you have high levels of moisture, then you would need to correct these first- before doing any remodeling/converting - into living spaces.

In the past, we have installed MR board and XP board on the lower half of basement walls. The new sheetrock that is on the market now that is looking very promising is 'densarmor'. It is paperless and the gypsum base is a treated material - that is claimed to be mold resistant. Click on link for further info:

http://www.gp.com/build/product.aspx...4659&hierarchy



Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)

I plan to put Canistal lighting and track lighting in.

Would you insulate the Cilling?

Basement ceilings are contained in a home's 'thermal envelope', thus, to insulate them offers no energy savings what-so-ever. On the other hand, basement ceilings are often insulated for 'sound-deadening/ acoustic reasons. If you do decide to insulate the ceilings for sound deadening - be sure to purchase acoustic insulation from a building supplier, as there are cost savings over thermal insulation.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rifeman (Post 36753)

I do have a problem with the basement being very cool in the Winter like being 60 degrees where the furance is not running, but it will warm up when it does. I feel that there is a cold draft comming from the cilling.

As previously mentioned, make sure that you 'thermal' insulate your joist bays - above the freeze-walls and against the rim joists...


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:02 AM.