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Old 02-18-2010, 06:58 PM   #1
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Recommendations: STEEL BATHTUB FRAME


Hi Folks

Im installing a basic steel bathrub with an exposed outer face/side, essentially like this one:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3394/...9e54ecebf1.jpg




I work with metal frequently so I understand the tub has a fair degree of rigidity in its design.

However the back has no side to speak of, thus it needs a frame of some sort to rest on. My former tub, installed in the 50s used a few 2x4s.




..........Im mostly just picking brains for good supportive designs and suggestions.





For example, am I wise to put a 2x4 spacer at the bottom front edge so it wont get accidentally kicked in....or something like that?

Also....

Can I install something other than that foam base underneath? I know it might squeak but I worry about it degrading over time with weight. Maybe a frame around it so as to keep the foam from splaying outward, sinking the tub.?



Many thanks
Drew

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Old 02-18-2010, 11:10 PM   #2
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Recommendations: STEEL BATHTUB FRAME


I have see them installed a couple times. Each one had a 2x4 frame with hard foam spray in several locations underneath for additional support.

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Old 02-19-2010, 06:25 AM   #3
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Steel tubs often need a ledger on the inside. Some have holes for nailing to the house framing. Some may need a bed of some kind, follow manufacturers instructions.
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Old 02-19-2010, 09:02 AM   #4
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Recommendations: STEEL BATHTUB FRAME


Dont see any holes per se.

I got the tub for 20 bucks in at Lowes because it had a small dink in the corner (which I have fixed and yet will still bill be concealed by the hardiebacker, tiles and... God Bless it --caulking!

I think I may have to just be creative...Ill take some pics.
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Old 02-19-2010, 11:50 AM   #5
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The inside edges should sit on a 2X4 ledger nailed to the studs at the proper height. I don't see any reason to put a spacer on the bottom edge but it would not hurt any thing if it makes you feel better. My dad... an old time plumber used to set steel tubs in cement, mortar or plaster, which ever was the most handy on that particular job site. I use foam because it can be added after the tub is set if necessary. Also if you can get it along that edge you are worried about and it will have the added benefit of insulating it from noise a little. As far as I am concerned the more foam you get in there the better. The first tub I set in foam was before foam came in cans, probably in the mid 80's. It's still solid with no signs of deterioration and that was foam that was intended for packing delicate materials. Light will degrade foam but you should have very little light under the tub.

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Old 02-19-2010, 02:07 PM   #6
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Recommendations: STEEL BATHTUB FRAME


Quote:
Originally Posted by RegeSullivan View Post
The inside edges should sit on a 2X4 ledger nailed to the studs at the proper height. I don't see any reason to put a spacer on the bottom edge but it would not hurt any thing if it makes you feel better. My dad... an old time plumber used to set steel tubs in cement, mortar or plaster, which ever was the most handy on that particular job site. I use foam because it can be added after the tub is set if necessary. Also if you can get it along that edge you are worried about and it will have the added benefit of insulating it from noise a little. As far as I am concerned the more foam you get in there the better. The first tub I set in foam was before foam came in cans, probably in the mid 80's. It's still solid with no signs of deterioration and that was foam that was intended for packing delicate materials. Light will degrade foam but you should have very little light under the tub.

Rege

Hi Rege


I presume you mean expanding foam in those cans (Great Stuff, for example?)

One approach I was toying around with was using a rubber mat contact cemented to the underside of the tub. This should eliminate a lot of noise if the underlying layer is wood, cement etc. My only concern would be the heat of the tub if soaking in it....but if the rubber layer is sufficiently wide, it shouldnt go anywhere.

I guess what it ...ahem, boils down to....ahem....is the length of the tubs lifetime. For all practical consideration I would think about 25 years for the average tub, at which point upgrading the bathroom might be something to then consider again. Alternatively I might be wise to keep bunch of extra tiles in case I wish to punch out the old ones, pull out the tub/replace with a new one and retile back up.

Did I mention Im thinking about converting my bathroom to a nuclear shelter, lol
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Old 02-20-2010, 05:55 PM   #7
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Exactly - Great Stuff or any brand of expanding foam should do the trick. I would be afraid of the rubber mat separating at some point in the future. I feel safe guaranteeing the foam will not come off unless you burn or scrape it off.

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