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smcmurrey 12-12-2008 02:04 PM

reading moisture content of cellulose insulation
 
I had cellulose insulation sprayed in the walls of my new house today. The sprayers said to give it till tuesday to hang drywall to let it airout. I read that it should be down to 20% moisture content before closing it up. Can anyone tell me how to take the moisture reading?

I was thinking about running the a/c all weekend to suck some moisture out, temps are ranging from 40-75 degrees F here right now with humidity between 70-80%. Would the heat or air do better at drying it out?

Thanks,
Stan.

Wildie 12-12-2008 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smcmurrey (Post 197191)
I had cellulose insulation sprayed in the walls of my new house today. The sprayers said to give it till tuesday to hang drywall to let it airout. I read that it should be down to 20% moisture content before closing it up. Can anyone tell me how to take the moisture reading?

I was thinking about running the a/c all weekend to suck some moisture out, temps are ranging from 40-75 degrees F here right now with humidity between 70-80%. Would the heat or air do better at drying it out?

Thanks,
Stan.

I would guess, and its only a guess that it would be better to run the a/c.
Warm air can hold more moisture per cubic foot than cool.
Moisture would be drawn into the warm air, then when it cools in the a/c 'A' coil the moisture is released and runs away, down the drain!

smcmurrey 12-12-2008 05:40 PM

Thanks for the response, I knew the a/c would pull moisture out but it may be too cold for it to come on. It is a heat pump so I may try the heater if it's too cold.

I found this document so I thought I'd post the link.

http://www.huberwood.com/media/pdf/Z...Insulation.pdf

Wildie 12-13-2008 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smcmurrey (Post 197270)
Thanks for the response, I knew the a/c would pull moisture out but it may be too cold for it to come on. It is a heat pump so I may try the heater if it's too cold.

I found this document so I thought I'd post the link.

http://www.huberwood.com/media/pdf/Z...Insulation.pdf

How about cycling between heating and cooling!

First run the temp up to about 80 F. The hot air would draw the moisture and then when the a/c runs the warm moisture laden air woukd release the moisture to the drain, when it cools.
When heating set the thermostat to 80 F. When cooling, set it to 65 F.
When the heat is up to 80 and the heat shuts off, switch the a/c on until it shuts off and so on!

smcmurrey 12-13-2008 04:02 PM

That's what I did. Last night I ran the a/c down to 50, before bed I set the heat to 70, then aired it most of today since it warmed up and was windy. I have the air running it down to 50 again right now. It is drying but not dry yet. I wish there was an easy way to check moisture content but so far I haven't found one.

Thanks,
Stan.

Wildie 12-13-2008 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smcmurrey (Post 197555)
That's what I did. Last night I ran the a/c down to 50, before bed I set the heat to 70, then aired it most of today since it warmed up and was windy. I have the air running it down to 50 again right now. It is drying but not dry yet. I wish there was an easy way to check moisture content but so far I haven't found one.

Thanks,
Stan.

There must be a clever way of doing this!

How about using a multimeter on a high ohms scale!
Put the probes in near the bottom of the insulation. About 12" apart!
If there is no reading keep moving them close until you get a reading!
The next day, as it dry's the reading should go higher!
keep doing this until you have no reading.
Then go around checking resistance at various places and if there's no sign of dampness, you should be safe.
Low levels of moisture will eventually be drawn out through the walls anyway!

smcmurrey 12-13-2008 08:43 PM

Well I happen to have a Megger so I went out and took measurements around the house with the probes about 3/4" apart. In a few spots it is noticably wet, they read less than 1MOhm. Most readings in the house where the a/c and heat have been running were 2-4MOhm. A few spots were around 20MOhm but they did not feel like they were packed the same density so that could change the reading. I'll keep an eye on it but I don't know what it should be reading.

The fiberglass was around 600MOhm.

Wildie 12-13-2008 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smcmurrey (Post 197637)
Well I happen to have a Megger so I went out and took measurements around the house with the probes about 3/4" apart. In a few spots it is noticably wet, they read less than 1MOhm. Most readings in the house where the a/c and heat have been running were 2-4MOhm. A few spots were around 20MOhm but they did not feel like they were packed the same density so that could change the reading. I'll keep an eye on it but I don't know what it should be reading.

The fiberglass was around 600MOhm.

If there's a section that you know that is dry, megger this and use it as your standard!

The megger was a good idea!


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