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Old 11-13-2013, 08:23 PM   #121
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Re: old buildings


House front, House left, Damaged deck 1, Damaged deck 2, House right, House rear.

I have since painted the upstairs windows white, and covered the hole in the back of the house. That was not the beaten down cellar door, however. I made that hole for hauling stones and dirt out of the cellar. Plaster by the rotted-out deck is from the upstairs bedroom ceiling I dropped. Damaged of siding on left side from gutters. I'll have to remove the siding and install new plywood below the surface. Meter was only pulled a couple months ago, right before I started looking at the place. Rotted deck needs rebuilt and needs a new roof over the portion that is over the main cellar. Other side of the deck has a small cellar that can only be accessed from the outside. Large house to the right is abandoned; small house to the left is occupied.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:33 PM   #122
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Re: old buildings


Living room one and two, Den (next to living room) one and two, attic above kitchen, and cellar steps.

You can see the fireplace that collapsed on me (just chimney now, chimney is soild) in the living room, and the new wooden fireplace I found in the house. Den with no windows (I opened up the hole on the right side. Suprise, there was a cut-out facing the enclosed porch where a window once was behind the drywall). Enclosed porch was an ad-on as well. Coal cellar below part of it. Den is full of stuff I have removed from other rooms, and has double closets. Obvious water damage to attic above kitchen, causing the ceiling to crack and bow. Vent will need blocked-off.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:43 PM   #123
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Kitchen one, two and three. Bathroom one, two and three.

Kitchen and bathroom are an addition (original siding inside of kitchen attic) on the back of the first floor. Main house is an old colonial, once with a fireplace on both sides. Kitchen looks more like the bathroom walls now that I have dropped all of the exterior kitchen walls. I also tore down the bathroom ceiling and the kitchen wall with the orange cabinet marks. All of which was drywall, except the kitchen ceiling. I was as black as a coal miner after the plaster and lathe ceiling was dropped, from years of coal dust. Kitchen carpet was pulled (2 layers-glued down) to reveal plywood. I dropped the ceiling to level out the huge bow, and to install more proper insulation. Walls were dropped because I wanted to access wires, and insulate; not to mention water damage from attic vent. The bathroom is the only bathroom in the house, and I intend saving the old cast iron bathtub, which still has the original finish on it. I'd like to install a full bath with a shower in the cellar at some point.
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Old 11-13-2013, 09:02 PM   #124
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Steps going up, Bedroom on left one and two, Bedroom on right one and two, and Steps going down.

Bedroom on left contains water damage from small hole and from lack of chimney liner/cap. Dropped the ceiling already in bedroom on right. Lots of holes from a previous leaks, so I ripped it all down. Will likely need drywalled. I left the lathe in place to hold up the inadequate R-11 insulation in the attic, which will eventually be replaced. You can also see evidence of a former chimney on that side of the house. Closet was once double-sided, but was partially blocked leaving the right bedroom with no closet. I plan on framing out a small closet in the corner. Main closet contains the very small trap to the main attic, which I have been in, but did not photograph. Nothing special to note up there.

Windows are in horrible shape, but they will do for now. I bought new glass and putty, and glued/screwed the sashes back together. The windows in worse shape were glued in place for support. I then smoothed them in wood putty and painted the exteriors. These windows, in my opinion, are beyond reasonable repair. But, for budgetary concerns, I will attempt to stretch a few more years out of them. Living room window is not much better, but the the two-over-two's in the kitchen and bathroom were in better shape. The window exteriors were down to the bare wood from years of no paint, most glass was broken, and the previous owners decided a layer of plastic would fix the window issues... *sigh*
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Old 11-13-2013, 09:25 PM   #125
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Looking into cellar, Damaged foundation wall below den one and two, 60 Amp main service disconnect, Cellar below kitchen, and Cellar below living room.

Door I opened and re-sealed from back yard. Was previously a door into a whole other house that consumed the entire back yard. Previous owner moved in 1958-2007 (written on furnace duct). The man is still alive, but he's in his 80's and not able to handle the steps or live anone anymore. Sold for $10,000 to investor in 2007, who tore down the dilapatated house in the backyard, and left the entire rear foundation below the kitchen wide open. Place was condemned, and donated to a church in 2010; likely wrote it off on his taxes. Pastor/contractor built a new support wall below kitchen, and had it removed from the condemned list. Hasn't touched it since. The hedges in front were grown over the porch roof before they met my chainsaw.

Damaged foundation wall is below den. From what I can understand, it wasn't nearly this bad since the church built the new rear wall. A gutter was left to empty onto the foundation wall for several years until it caved. It was like a small water-fall in the cellar until I re-directed the gutter. Caved-in section on right is less important (only below rotted deck). Caved-in section on left with all of the dirt is more vital, although it is not load-bearing considering the studs in the floor run the other way. Seems to have a fairly solid header under it. I have removed some of the dirt and stones since, which are still burying the water-meter. Place is full of damaged galvanized plumbing and broken PVC which need replaced. 60 Amp fusebox will likely need replaced, as well as the missing copper (only missing in cellar ceiling). Gas meter hook-up is next to furnace inside for some reason (don't know it that's to code). Huge "body-sized" chest freezer left in cellar as well. Duct work is newer and in nice shape. Supply in every room, Return in every room except for the kitchen and bathroom. I also plan on removing the asbestos tiles from below the enclosed front porch windows and using them to cover the missing tiles below the kitchen windows (where the rear house once met the main house).

***This Post - End of Pictures -- Posts start on page 8 of thread***

So, what do you think? Obviously, the cellar wall is the biggest issue. But, if the man-power needed is over-looked, I roughly price the materials (Cinderblock, moartar, etc...) at under $1,000. That will be the biggest project, however.
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Old 11-15-2013, 12:24 AM   #126
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Wow you really have your work cut out for you on this, even my house which I bought for $7,900 on 1/2 acre of land wasn't anywhere near this bad, it was in move-in condition though the exterior paint was almost all peeled down to bare clapboards which turned grey, there was no real rot.
This house looks like it will almost have to be totally gutted to the bare walls and everything from electrical to plumbing etc replaced. That fuse box is definitely obsolete and have to be replaced, I would be amazed if the power company will even connect power to this in it's present condition, if there is power currently then count your blessings, leave well enough alone and don't do anything to cause them to come out and look or they could order the power turned off right then and there and the wiring and fuse box replaced by a licensed electrician before they'll even turn power back on again.

Are you even going to be able to get insurance on this property? I guess since the purchase price was only $1000 there's no mortgage/bank involved (who WOULD require insurance you'd likely never get for this place in the current condition)

I do have some concerns too about that abandoned house on the right so close, any kid, vandal, scrapper, druggie or homeless person could drop a match, lit cigarette butt or even a lit candle in there some night and if that place goes up it's so close to your house it would definitely be a severe risk to your property.

With winter coming now, you do need to get the holes closed up at least.
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Old 11-15-2013, 04:34 PM   #127
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Re: old buildings


Hello guys - don't mean to 'intrude' on this thread but I followed it earlier as I found both of your comments interesting and well-worth reading; same for the pics.

@mt99999; that's a lovely little house and I'm curious about it's age. Looking at the design of the downstairs front windows (small panes above, larger panes below), over here it would be about 1880's/1890's. Would that be about right, or am I way out!?
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Old 11-15-2013, 04:48 PM   #128
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Nah, no intrusion, it's a public thread, feel free to chime in anywhere!
I'm thinking this house is closer to the 1910s to 1920 era, I think too it's been resided with that wider material which was popular in the 70s.
This reminds me of that guy in Detroit on youtube who seems to have a nice little business of finding and repairing houses for investors, he puts up videos showing the houses and he hires people to renovate and repair, paint etc and then finds renters for the new owner.


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Old 11-15-2013, 07:33 PM   #129
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Originally Posted by tony.g View Post
Hello guys - don't mean to 'intrude' on this thread but I followed it earlier as I found both of your comments interesting and well-worth reading; same for the pics.

@mt99999; that's a lovely little house and I'm curious about it's age. Looking at the design of the downstairs front windows (small panes above, larger panes below), over here it would be about 1880's/1890's. Would that be about right, or am I way out!?
No problem Tony! When it was listed with a realty company many moons ago, the listing stated 1920. I believe this to be inaccurate, considering that the first floor kitchen and bathroom appear to be a 1920's addition. If you look at the attic above the kitchen, you can see original wooden siding that indicates that the kitchen didn't used to be there. Plus, the 2-over-2 windows in the kitchen and bathroom appear from a different time period, and the wall between the kitchen and the rest of the first floor is significantly thicker than the other walls.

The front porch with the 4-over-1 windows is an addition that I would imagine to be around the time of the kitchen considering the original front door added on the enclosed porch that I found, and the windows. Plus, the original siding is visible behind the porch drywall. You can see the opening I cut into one room where I was accurate that a window was once there, with the original siding cut around it. It is currently sided in asbestos siding that I plan on caulking and patching, then painting. Under the porch, you can see where the stone wall would have originally come, and it was cut back. The original porch posts are being used as support posts for the front of the house now, LOL. There is a coal room under half of the porch.

I believe the house was an old colonial, with evidence of a fireplace on either side of the house, and the four 12X15 rooms, the living room and bedrooms, were the only original part of the house. There is evidence of an old single-pass steam boiler with a pipe coming out of the floor by the chimney in each main room. I have a thread on this site in HVAC about the current furnace in this house. The fact that the woodwork was installed, and THEN plaster and lathe was added, says something to the old age of the place. To get to the point... my guess, with other minor evidence, is that the original portion of this house was built in the late 1800's, with a kitchen and bath added in the 1920's. What do you think, RWolf?
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Old 11-15-2013, 07:53 PM   #130
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Could be, there's not much left visibly of the original house after they apparantly did some extensive remodelling in 1920, it's basically a 1920 house now.

Mine was built in 1930 but I found plenty of clear proof the kitchen was originally a back porch and it was converted around 1950 to a kitchen by installing plaster and lath walls etc. The abstracts show a loan and the bathroom sink, tub and toilet were dated 1950 and under the old oil cloth flooring were sheets of newspapers from early 1950s.
By the 60s plaster and lath walls were no more, since sheetrock came out.
The wall between the kitchen and the rest of the house had wide horizontal pine boards normally used under clapboard, and that wall has blown-in insulation like the rest of the exterior walls.
The front porch was not originally there either, I could see roof shingles and some painted clapboard inside the ceiling of it, it was probably added a few years later or maybe in 1950 too.

Your abstracts might say more, look for loans, second mortgages or sudden increases in property taxes- that's when new portions would have been added.
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Old 11-15-2013, 08:02 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
Wow you really have your work cut out for you on this, even my house which I bought for $7,900 on 1/2 acre of land wasn't anywhere near this bad, it was in though the exterior paint was almost all peeled down to bare clapboards which turned grey, there was no real rot.move-in condition
This house looks like it will almost have to be totally gutted to the bare walls and everything from electrical to plumbing etc replaced. That fuse box is definitely obsolete and have to be replaced, I would be amazed if the power company will even connect power to this in it's present condition, if there is power currently then count your blessings, leave well enough alone and don't do anything to cause them to come out and look or they could order the power turned off right then and there and the wiring and fuse box replaced by a licensed electrician before they'll even turn power back on again.

Are you even going to be able to get insurance on this property? I guess since the purchase price was only $1000 there's no mortgage/bank involved (who WOULD require insurance you'd likely never get for this place in the current condition)

I do have some concerns too about that abandoned house on the right so close, any kid, vandal, scrapper, druggie or homeless person could drop a match, lit cigarette butt or even a lit candle in there some night and if that place goes up it's so close to your house it would definitely be a severe risk to your property.

With winter coming now, you do need to get the holes closed up at least.
I have heard that I have my work cut out for me a dozen times over, between family, friends and neighbors... in those words. A pattern is developing... LOL. This place was listed for $7,400. I talked him down to a much more reasonable price considering condition and location. Parking is tough on this hill. I park on the perpendicular street across from me. I found the pastor and his "team" rebuilt the rear support wall on the back of the kitchen (pink plastic on rear of house). It was once wide open when the house behind it was torn down after the old man moved out. That new wall got it off of the condemned list... good thing the city doesn't know about the other wall! The city did send an order a year ago to rebuild or tear down the rotted-out deck.

I have been all through the place next door. Looks like it was once a storefront, which I learned a sandwich shop was in a storefront on this hill a LONG time ago. It has been converted to two houses. Still has the steps coming up from the street to the second floor from the sidewalk. There are alot of burnt spoons and needles in that place to give you the idea. I plan on investing a few bucks in plywood to cover the broken windows and the beaten-in door to keep the brats and bums out. Neighbors told me that teenage kids sometimes sleep inside of it. I have been worried about someone lighting a fire, and I certainly can't afford insurance at the moment. I'm "donating" a thousand dollars to the church, and they are quit-claiming the property to me. Clever.. huh? Money is tight, I have to do it all on a budget. Don't know if I mentioned it before, but I am fresh out of high school. I suppose the Thompson building was a bit out of my range.

I have already gutted the kitchen walls and ceiling, as well as the bathroom. I'd like to keep the plaster in the other rooms. The man had a good amount of outlets installed. Three per bedroom, and like 6 per room downstairs. The dry-wall sections in the house were done by the previous owner who moved in in 1958, and out in 2007. He wrote his name behind the plaster board, installed 1976, and that he was 47 years old. He has half of his life story written on the ductwork in the cellar LOL. Don't know when the siding was done, but likely between 50's and 70's. The dingy green color is original factory finish... I'll just paint it with a sprayer. Already puttied and painted what is left of the upstairs windows white. Kitchen/bathroom windows are still in fairly good shape.

Plumbing is a mix of rusty galvanized and broken PVC. It all needs re-done, but the job is simple. Water heater is directly below kitchen sink and the bathroom, so not many runs needed. The water heater has been full of water for the past 7 years! I drained it... at least the tank isn't broken! Electrical is scary. Mix-up of knob and tube spliced into old romex. I'll slap some new romex where necessary, and several junction boxes. Some of the wiring is stolen out of the cellar ceiling, but it's still in the walls. Kitchen sink and bathroom with get new GFCI outlets on a 12 ga. line to comply with code. I already have a cabinet plan (when I can afford it) pictured below. Did it up on the internet. Neat... eh? The left kitchen window from the inside will be partially covered by the cabnet, but oh well. I'll paint it shut! LOL. The 2D version doesn't seem to be showing. The 36" cabinet to the left of the bathroom door by the wall is a double sink basin cabinet.

No utilites are connected at the moment. Power company just pulled the meter a couple months ago. I called in to see what it would need to be reconnected, and she said a deposit to turn on the electric, and an engineer from the company will be sent out to inspect the fusebox. Darn... I'll probably have to replace it. I was hoping to get away with patching in the missing wires convicingly, but one of the pull-out fuse blocks up top is quite corroded. Don't think they still sell replacenets. Gas meter is (or was) located inside next to the furnace for some reason. Water meter is (or was) buried under the collapsed cellar wall. I'll use something to block those holes this weekend.
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Old 11-15-2013, 09:21 PM   #132
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Re: old buildings


[QUOTE=mt999999;1267081
There are alot of burnt spoons and needles in that place to give you the idea. I plan on investing a few bucks in plywood to cover the broken windows and the beaten-in door to keep the brats and bums out. Neighbors told me that teenage kids sometimes sleep inside of it. I have been worried about someone lighting a fire, and I certainly can't afford insurance at the moment.[/quote]

It's already a big risk- people have been cooking cocaine or something in there and half stoned fools with a lit lighter or matches in one hand and needle in the other losing consciousness is a perfect way to start a fire, hopefully you can secure it with a couple of sheets of plywood.

Quote:
Money is tight, I have to do it all on a budget. Don't know if I mentioned it before, but I am fresh out of high school. I suppose the Thompson building was a bit out of my range.
Not that I recall, I guess I thought you were older, 30s or 40s, fresh out of high school folks don't usually embark on trying to buy a building to renovate, but yeah we're ALL on a budget these days...

Quote:
Water heater is directly below kitchen sink and the bathroom, so not many runs needed. The water heater has been full of water for the past 7 years! I drained it... at least the tank isn't broken!
Same here with short runs, inlet and tank right under the bath/kitchen, I used copper pipe.

Quote:
Electrical is scary. Mix-up of knob and tube spliced into old romex. I'll slap some new romex where necessary, and several junction boxes.
Quote:
No utilites are connected at the moment. Power company just pulled the meter a couple months ago. I called in to see what it would need to be reconnected, and she said a deposit to turn on the electric, and an engineer from the company will be sent out to inspect the fusebox. Darn... I'll probably have to replace it. I was hoping to get away with patching in the missing wires convicingly, but one of the pull-out fuse blocks up top is quite corroded. Don't think they still sell replacenets.
Well you are in a big bind there, however... you might be able to find a USED/SALVAGED 100 or even better a 200 amp circuit breaker panel, even up on ebay. Since the power is off you could probably carefully replace that fuse box with the used one, make it look like it's been there for years and secure all the wires properly and neatly, show the guy the breaker box and if asked you know NOTHING about it, it was there when you bought the place, and you might get power to it, but guaranteed they won't put power in that fusebox mess there now.
You can get something like this but more "used" looking, this one is going for $59



http://www.ebay.com/itm/Square-D-Hom...item2c764f5a24
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Old 11-15-2013, 10:15 PM   #133
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It's already a big risk- people have been cooking cocaine or something in there and half stoned fools with a lit lighter or matches in one hand and needle in the other losing consciousness is a perfect way to start a fire, hopefully you can secure it with a couple of sheets of plywood.

Not that I recall, I guess I thought you were older, 30s or 40s, fresh out of high school folks don't usually embark on trying to buy a building to renovate, but yeah we're ALL on a budget these days...

Same here with short runs, inlet and tank right under the bath/kitchen, I used copper pipe.

Well you are in a big bind there, however... you might be able to find a USED/SALVAGED 100 or even better a 200 amp circuit breaker panel, even up on ebay. Since the power is off you could probably carefully replace that fuse box with the used one, make it look like it's been there for years and secure all the wires properly and neatly, show the guy the breaker box and if asked you know NOTHING about it, it was there when you bought the place, and you might get power to it, but guaranteed they won't put power in that fusebox mess there now.
You can get something like this but more "used" looking, this one is going for $59

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Square-D-Hom...item2c764f5a24

There are a couple street level windows that are smashed. Plus the front door, 2 back doors, and very small basement "hatch" on the side. The other windows would require a ladder, and I doubt someone would go to that extent, considering an empty lot away, the next house down the hill is also abandoned with the door wide open. I "toured" it also. Roof is shot, and it is very small, so I kept on looking. This house is too far away to be a threat. All other near-by houses are occupied.

People usually think I am significantly older than I am. I hope I'll be living in a better place when I'm 30/40 years old! A garage would be nice. I know I'm young, but I'd like to get away from my parents eventually, and I just can't see throwing away the money every month for a rental. I'd rather have a place with no mortgage or rent, and this seems like a deal. Property taxes are only $150 a year at the moment. All of this assuming I can get the cash to get it liveable. I'll likely have to try and get a small loan, maybe $10,000 to put in the minimal making it liveable. It would be alot less per month than rent or a mortgage. I'm fine with Goodwill furniture, used cabinets and stick-down linoleum. It doesn't have to be high-class.

I was initially thinking about PEX piping, but seeing how small the runs will be, might as well use copper. I am more comfortable with copper, believe it or not. Even more than just the feel of soldering, it seems more sturdy than clamp-together plastic lines. I'll look into the new breaker box. Can't be too hard to install. I know a little bit of electrical. Wost case, if I can only find a new-looking box, I'll paint the box to match the cellar walls with dry-lok paint. Some white dry-lok would really brighten up that dingy cellar... of course, after there are complete walls to dry-lok.

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Old 11-16-2013, 01:05 PM   #134
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Quote:
I'll likely have to try and get a small loan, maybe $10,000 to put in the minimal making it liveable.
This could prove to be the more difficult part of this, with several things working against you- the banks have become much more stringent on loans, this property would not be able to be used as collateral and even if it was they would require it be insured which brings out another difficulty.
Unless you have great credit, it might be that your parents would have to co-sign and guarantee the loan or even apply for the loan themselves and loan it to you. It's a catch 22, you need great credit, good downpayment in cash, and assetts to GET mortgages and loans but if you have all that you don't really NEED a loan now eh!

The bank will run a credit check on you, if you have no credit history that's real bad. When I bought my building I had $5000 cash to put down on the $15k purchase, I also have a higher than 800 credit score which when my bank manager went over the whole thing with me he actually remarked "you have an excellent credit score, over 800." I've also banked with my bank for 16 years and my house mortgage was obtained through them, so the small staff there all know me very well more or less personally.

I think your best bet is going to, or through your parents for the loan in some way.

Yes, you could get a newer breaker box and just paint over it along with the wall which would help make it look like it's always been there, or is not a recent install.
15 years ago that's pretty much what I did, took out the old two fuse fuse box and put in a Homline main lugs breaker box, yep I worked live but made sure I was not grounded in any way and removed one main wire at a time and wire nutted and taped the bare ends then pulled them out of the old box one at a time.
Put the new box in and installed each of the 3 main wires in one at a time carefully keeping the nut and taped ends intact and covered untill they were where they needed to be.

In your case the power is already off so that will be good for you.
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Old 11-16-2013, 06:43 PM   #135
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Re: old buildings


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Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
This could prove to be the more difficult part of this, with several things working against you- the banks have become much more stringent on loans, this property would not be able to be used as collateral and even if it was they would require it be insured which brings out another difficulty.
Unless you have great credit, it might be that your parents would have to co-sign and guarantee the loan or even apply for the loan themselves and loan it to you. It's a catch 22, you need great credit, good downpayment in cash, and assetts to GET mortgages and loans but if you have all that you don't really NEED a loan now eh!

The bank will run a credit check on you, if you have no credit history that's real bad. When I bought my building I had $5000 cash to put down on the $15k purchase, I also have a higher than 800 credit score which when my bank manager went over the whole thing with me he actually remarked "you have an excellent credit score, over 800." I've also banked with my bank for 16 years and my house mortgage was obtained through them, so the small staff there all know me very well more or less personally.

I think your best bet is going to, or through your parents for the loan in some way.

Yes, you could get a newer breaker box and just paint over it along with the wall which would help make it look like it's always been there, or is not a recent install.
15 years ago that's pretty much what I did, took out the old two fuse fuse box and put in a Homline main lugs breaker box, yep I worked live but made sure I was not grounded in any way and removed one main wire at a time and wire nutted and taped the bare ends then pulled them out of the old box one at a time.
Put the new box in and installed each of the 3 main wires in one at a time carefully keeping the nut and taped ends intact and covered untill they were where they needed to be.

In your case the power is already off so that will be good for you.
Currently, I don't have cash on hand for a down payment. Out of high school in May I had no credit, but I did get a $10,000 loan for a car. My mom's name is on the title, I guess I co-signed. However that works, we did it so that I would get some credit to my name. I make all of the payments since we have bought it, but that is only a couple of months. I haven't had any late, but I don't know what a few months of payments will even add up to. I could try to get one of my parents to co-sign for me. I'm not making enough at my current job to handle utilities, but I'm looking for a job closer. Knock 60-70 dollars out of the gas every week. I have a pretty sucky commute. Ought to take up DJ'ing on weekends.

I don't think I mentioned it, but at the moment, I don't currently "own" the house. I have an agreement worked out with the pastor, but I probably ought to get something on paper. He said a thousand dollars cash was fine in the spring. I have been setting a small amount of money out of every pay to be on track to having a thousand dollars cash in April. He told me he didn't care what I did to the place in the meantime. I guess he figures it can't get any worse. Point is, I figure instead of giving him that thousand dollars, I could use it as a down payment on the $10,000, and just give him a thousand dollars out of the loan. Wouldn't that work?

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