Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-12-2013, 03:49 PM   #106
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 686
Share |
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by mt999999 View Post
perhaps God has other plans for me...

.
They say the 'Powers That Be' sometimes move in mysterious ways.
Maybe there is an even better proposition waiting for you around the corner.
tony.g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 07:09 PM   #107
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by mt999999 View Post
Well, I got news today that crushed my hopes and dreams like a garbage compactor, or so it felt anyway. I heard that someone bought the building for "a project". The next thing I learned, was that it was just sold for ONLY $13,000; the Lowe building included in the price. I'm very disappointed, but perhaps God has other plans for me...

Beautiful house, by the way. I love the old woodwork and the organ. I especially like the white painted tin ceiling, I think it looks even nice than the bare metal one. Must have taken you a long time on just the woodwork alone.
I'm sorry to hear, I know how wrapped up in this you were, but still, I can't help but think maybe it's for the best! Unless you have a large disposable income and a good sized nest egg and steady sure income, this project would have run you into the poorhouse fast.
So someone else bought it, now you know fairly sure that they won't rot further or be demolished, time for you to keep an eye out for something similar even if it's in a nearby town.
I kind of figured that the time that went by since this topic started with your plans, that someone would come along and make an offer and walk away with the buildings.
As I say with real estate, procrastination is someone else's opportunity to come in unexpectedly and snap up an opportunity from under you. Most likely this deal has been in the works for some time, you just were not party to it.
Thanks for the complements and yes, it's taken a long time!
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 01:29 PM   #108
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
I'm sorry to hear, I know how wrapped up in this you were, but still, I can't help but think maybe it's for the best! Unless you have a large disposable income and a good sized nest egg and steady sure income, this project would have run you into the poorhouse fast.
So someone else bought it, now you know fairly sure that they won't rot further or be demolished, time for you to keep an eye out for something similar even if it's in a nearby town.
I kind of figured that the time that went by since this topic started with your plans, that someone would come along and make an offer and walk away with the buildings.
As I say with real estate, procrastination is someone else's opportunity to come in unexpectedly and snap up an opportunity from under you. Most likely this deal has been in the works for some time, you just were not party to it.
Thanks for the complements and yes, it's taken a long time!
I certainly would hope so, Tony!

Yes, perhaps your are right. A large, disposable income is certainly NOT something that I have, but I feel that when there is a will, there is a way. I tend to be a dreamer, and perhaps my plans were over my head. I imagined I could make the back area a liveable space, not to mention the storefronts would take minimal efforts to be useable as well, and that would start a good income for needed repair funds for the rest of the building. I could have atleast started with the storefront areas and then moved on to the upstairs. Not to mention the Liberty Tax store occupying the main storefront; that would bring in revenue as well.

I can't be sure it wont be demolished, I don't know the people very well who purchased it. A woman bought it, and I was talking to her son. He said she purchased it for a "project", and she wanted to turn the "30 or so upstairs rooms" into a hotel/apartments type area. He didn't sound too sure, and lord knows how his mom could handle a complete renovation/restoration. He stressed that there was a full bar in the cellar, and that's all he seemed interested in.

I'd imagine the woman has barely seen the building, and would likely just leave the deterorating woodwork and windows as they are, perhaps because they still are somewhat painted yellow. I don't imagine that those type of people will do much with it at all, and I'm sure they wouldn't pay me to paint the windows/woodwork. I can't afford to voulenteer to do a job like that for free, despite how much it would kill me to see it rot more.

Plus, I have been talking to the man that runs the historical society, and I got wind of a rumor that a Utah Firm (Better Cities LCC) has put that building on it's list of buildings it would like to see torn down to "better the city". They were hired to help the city's economic development, I suppose. They couldn't pay me enough for the deed if I owned it, but that woman might jump on the offer if they offered her, say, $30,000 to purchase it and tear it down. I guess it is because the building has a great location. The whole thought just makes me sick, I hope it's all just a rumor.

Who knows, maybe I'll be in better financial shape in a few years, the woman will realize she is in over her head after doing nearly nothing to the building, and I will once again have the opprotunity to purchase it. Hopefully she'll value historical architecture over making a few bucks, incase that firm does make an offer on it.

Perhaps the deal has been going on for awhile. I did have trouble finding the tax information on it under Ian Braslawsce's name. Funny though, the for sale sign is still in the back storefront's window, and it is still listed on the website. Her son told me she paid in cash, maybe they just went around the real estate company to avoid real estate fees.

The buildings were for sale for years and years, like other downtown buildings. I didn't imagine anyone was interested. That was my mistake. Well, at least I learned a lesson from all of this. Not to mention, I learned lots of procedures from you on building repair and what not. I'll just wait to see what the future holds. We can continue this thread on another building just for the sake of conversation, and learning new things, if you want.

Last edited by mt999999; 03-13-2013 at 09:08 PM.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2013, 12:30 AM   #109
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


A little trip over to Detroit's situation will be a real eye opener:

$1 to buy a house...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRpG9CjjhWI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWEdjiEJg0U

Detroit on fire...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDoUpXNmcZA
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2013, 12:14 PM   #110
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
A little trip over to Detroit's situation will be a real eye opener:

$1 to buy a house...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRpG9CjjhWI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWEdjiEJg0U

Detroit on fire...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDoUpXNmcZA

Holy cow... Detroit sure is a mess. I can't believe it only costs a dollar to buy some homes. How does the real estate agent even make any profits? If I lived closer to detroit, I might try to invest in a few of those one dollar homes and try to make a little money off of renting them as low-income housing. Couldn't put any money into the homes, though, because the tenants would likely trash them. Just an interesting idea. I will have to visit the city one day, though. It would be an interesting sight to see. Have you ever been to Detroit yourself?

Since Pittsburgh, Pa is local, I tend to go through the city alot. There is a small area surrounded by the city that refused to merge with it called Mt. Oliver. They even maintain their own police force. Anyway, in Mt. Oliver, there was a Catholic school called Bishop Leonard. There was another Catholic school called St. Mary of the Mount up on Mount Washington. There was not enough funds or attendance for both schools, and they had to merge. The local bishop of the Pittsburgh area attended St. Mary of the Mount when he was young, so he decided that it would stay open, and the larger, nicer school, which was Bishop Leonard, would close. The school even had their own bowling alley in the cellar.

Anyway, Bishop Leonard has been closed for 8 years now or so, and it is a sad sight. Broken windows everywhere, and pigeons are flying in and out of upstairs windows. I took several exterior pictures. When I get the chance, I will post them. This spring, I would like to go inside with a small group and get more pictures. There is a broken groundfloor window, with a folding chair convienently place outside for easy enterance. The building is a real shame. I couldn't find any online pictures, but I'll post some when I get home.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:51 PM   #111
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


I photographed the Little building in downtown East Liverpool today. The building is anything but little, it is massive. There are four floors of offices above the storefront level (6 storefronts and a lobby), and when you walk in the main lobby (door on the corner to the left of the telephone-pole), you are greeted by a staircase and an elevator. The elevator is old-fashioned, and only operated by the elevator operator. The man is only there two days of the week (lack of demand), and he wasn't there today. The pictures below are ones I took today. I took over 200 hundred pictures today, and some of my favorites are posted below. BTW, the ONLY occupied office is a lawyer. The rest are entirely empty. Almost all of the upstairs offices were left unlocked and empty, so I went in and took pictures. It is a cool building, although it is very poorly maintained.

First picture, exterior (1914). Second, nice Thompson building view from the fifth floor. Third, nice view of part of East Liverpool from the fifth floor bathroom. Fourth, hallway, fourth floor. Fifth, old Dr's office, fourth floor. Sixth, last occupied office, third floor.

Now, I can't find the pictures of Bishop Leonard, but that could be for another day. Another bit of good news. I talked with the new owners of the Thompson building, and they said the deed will be in their name next week. They told me that before they changed anything, I could get a photographic tour of building. They seemed ambitious, so maybe they will make something out of it. At the least, I could offer to re-do the windows to make a little money on the side. It's worth a shot, I think.
Attached Thumbnails
Re: old buildings-dscf4718.jpg   Re: old buildings-dscf4537.jpg   Re: old buildings-dscf4593.jpg   Re: old buildings-dscf4622.jpg   Re: old buildings-dscf4630.jpg  

Re: old buildings-dscf4660.jpg  

Last edited by mt999999; 03-20-2013 at 09:57 PM.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2013, 12:52 AM   #112
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


I like that "little" building, it has a not very common angled corners.
I've been following that German house rebuild here, 150+ pages worth!

It is interesting to see the differences in construction compared to here, the guy posted loads of progress pics, I'm up to page 80 so far:

German House Rebuild

I had posted a pic of this house there, the 1870 Stewart mansion, stone, faced with white marble, it was demolished in 1901- just 30 years after it was built.
This was on 5th Avenue at 34th street in Manhattan, across the street from where the Empire State Building would be built 30 years later:




Here's a view down Broadway (Manhattan) looking South towards Trinity church from a ca.1860 magic lantern glass slide I own, only 2 buildings in this view survive today- the church in the background, and another church on the right in the foreground with the columns. It is slightly out of focus in the picture because the image is sandwiched between two pieces of glass and I scanned it, but the original slide is so razer sharp it has no grain or blur to it




And this is an interesting scene too, on a stereoview card I also own, this dates back to around 1880 and the interesting thing is, up ahead on the left is where that building I posted the photo of with the copper cornice was built in 1892, so this view shows what was there BEFORE.
Also, it is fun to examine under a magnifier every milimeter of a picture like this, and the last photo will show why:





It's not obvious in the view, but in the lower left corner you can see this:



Obviously a boy riding somewhere on the back of probably his father's wagon heading North up Broadway around Prince Street, his shadow offers some clues too, since East is to the right in this photo, and the weather does not appear to be cold/winter, it appears this was taken not long before noon maybe in the spring or early fall, which would mean boy and father were most likely heading back somewhere after having unloaded whatever was in the wagon.
Clearly the kid has spotted the photographer who would have been standing on a balcony at the hotel at this location, on the 2nd floor with a tripod and large format wet plate camera, quite obvious. It appears the glare of the sun is being fought by the boy as he looks up.
Where were they heading, what did they unload? so many questions in this view that will never be answered!

In this view, most all of the buildings in it still exist, except next to the Vogel Brothers on the left- they widened that cross-street and that little 2 story building beyond it and one of the buildings further up were demolished, and the 1892 building with the copper cornice was built on the other side of that widened cross street further up, taking out a couple of other buildings on that side.
One can also see in this view, the pair of horses pulling the horse car, these were converted (replaced) to a cable pulled system in 1894

Last edited by RWolff; 03-21-2013 at 01:21 AM.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2013, 08:06 PM   #113
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


I like the Little building too! A few storefronts downstairs are occupied as well. It is for sale, but the man selling it is crazy; he wants $175,000! With the Thompson and Lowe buildings across the street selling for $13,000, buildings just don't sell that expensive in this area. It is a cool building; not to mention the beautiful tile floors, original 1914 elevator, and the cast iron mail drops on each floor. But, it's purpose is about gone in this town. There is not enough business to boast it anymore; it's just not worth the asking price.

It is a nice place for people like me without cars; when it's cold out, I can just stop into the heated building and warm up. It's nice and quiet! Speaking of heated, look at the old boiler in this building! (posted below) I believe they are still using this boiler, (I think it's original) and I'm sure it's converted to gas. See the other historical society pictures on the page below, they are pretty cool. I couldn't get into the basement; I'm sure they had a "tour guide" on their visit.

http://www.eastliverpoolhistoricalso...leBuilding.htm

Why did they tear down the Stewart Mansion after just 30 years? I seem to remember the Empire State building being build in 1933 (or was it 1931?), correct? I didn't even notice the boy on the cart at first; pretty cool. You must have alot more old New York memoribilia; you ought to start a website!
Attached Thumbnails
Re: old buildings-p3070131lb-1-.jpg  
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 10:51 PM   #114
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


More decay in Detroit!

On the left is a recent drive by video from youtube, on the right is Google's street view images from about 5 years ago or so:












The guy makign the vide drove up and down several streets, many of them have every house on them like these- abandoned, maybe 1 or 2 holdouts surrounded by a bombed out Cairo like neighborhood.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2013, 10:47 PM   #115
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


I was inside the Thompson building the other day. I wasn't prepared to go in it, and I didn't have my camera on me, so I didn't get any pictures. The woman seemed pretty iffy about me going through it, it's in bad shape. Her son convinced her to let me come back later in the summer, likely several times, and he said he'd get me into areas of the building that I didn't get the chance to see. I offered to help them clean and repair things, permitted that I have the extra time. They haven't done much, but there were lots of boxes in disarray, and they were dismantling a radiator on the second floor landing. She said she was cleaning and restoring the radiators.

Now, I was up inside the whole second floor of the Thompson building, including the back portion above the former tattoo parlor (Second Floor; Truck Drivers Union). I was allowed only to the landing of the third floor, and there was a long, narrow roof hatch ahead, and several dead pigeons. He told me they were up on the roof, and used several drums of tar just to slow the leaks, there were several. They said there were still a few small ones that needed tending to. I was only able to explore on the third floor above the old tattoo parlor (and above the second floor truck driver's union). There were several buckled floor boards from moisture on that level, and most of the plaster on the ceiling was missing. Lots of spots on the floors where plastic was laid out, as well as spots with buckets, likely where the leaks were worse. I was also inside the street level, former tattoo parlor. The tin ceiling in that room was pretty bad as well.

Everything was filthy in general, and it was very poorly lit, the whole building. The condition of the building might have gotten worse since pictures were last taken, but that camera flash from the historical society pictures must have made it a lot brighter. Plus, it was a cloudy day when I went into it. It really didn't seem a whole lot worse. It was about 20 degrees colder in the building than it was outside. The windows were bad. Most were painted shut, and some were falling inward, certain ones rattled in the wind. I will offer my knowledge on restoring those old double hung windows. There were lots of tiny, very dark rooms and cubby holes throughout. She didn't yet want anyone inside the Lowe building, which is probably understandable. She didn't want anyone in the basement either, for some reason. Her son said he'd get me in those areas, as well as the third floor of the Thompson building later this summer. I saw an entrance to the Lowe building from the second floor main landing of the Thompson building.

Her son also told me that he found a small hatch on the roof level that led into the fourth level of the turret, but he could not find any entrance to the area with the two small windows and the slanted roof that is right next to it, anywhere. I said I'd help look for it. He also said he could not get inside the cubby hole door on the roof to get to the turret, simply because the many layers of roofing tar that have been applied over the years has gummed up the bottom of the door, but I suppose it could really be forced open. It's possible that the entrance to the little room with the slanted roof was through the top turret room, that no one has been in yet. Likely hasn't been entered in years and years. You never know what treasures might be up in the attic of really old buildings like these. The attic of the Lowe building has over a foot of pigeon crap in some spots, above the fourth floor. It's a short area, maybe 2 and a half feet tall ceiling, and it's in really bad shape!

Another note; her son told me that the previous owner of the building didn't really seem to care about it at all, but he was a much older guy. Now, she didn't see half of the issues with it until after money had been exchanged. I believe she bought it with cash. He didn't really explain any of the building to them. Now, from what I've been told, I believe the previous owner's son, probably Ian, was in there smashing things up just for the fun of it. There were boxes of stuff dumped and scattered across the floor, and the carpeting was very trashed in spots. It is such a sad building, and it really deserves some care. I am glad that they bought it at this point. It might not have been able to hold out a few more years until I got my opportunity. They will likely be the ones to save the place. I might still get my chance though, she seems a bit regretful of it. She discussed doing "some work" and then selling the place again.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2013, 11:34 PM   #116
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


Odd to start this with cleaning the radiators! That one really baffles me, since the whole boiler and heating system is likely going to need replacement and it's spring, the most important thing to start with is the roof leaks not the radiators...
Well it sounds like they are going to do something at least.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2013, 01:40 PM   #117
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
Odd to start this with cleaning the radiators! That one really baffles me, since the whole boiler and heating system is likely going to need replacement and it's spring, the most important thing to start with is the roof leaks not the radiators...
Well it sounds like they are going to do something at least.
I thought it was strange too, but I am glad they are doing it. I would have no clue how to tear them apart and put them back together. They did get up on the roof and tar it, which is a good place to start. Apparantly, she wants to save the windows too. Now, I don't know how they will go about doing it. Personally, I would remove the glass and carefully label the sashes, and them ship them out to be "dipped and stripped" of paint. If they are interested, would you still be interested in replicating some missing/damaged woodwork? I know some of the "long lost" pieces of woodwork were saved indoors (As in, woodwork that had fallen off before the last painting, which was in the early '90's). It's still repairable, but when you let the paint go for 20 years, it makes a mess. It should have been painted 2, maybe even 3 times over since the last coat. I still think some of the water damage is coming from the Lowe building. I don't think that roof is repairable at all.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2013, 12:27 AM   #118
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


Just an update, while it sure isn't as grand as the Thompson Building, I did just purchase a house with cash. Talked the pastor at the church it was donated to down to a thousand dollars. Minus missing/damaged electrical and plumbing, completely rotted-out windows, plaster damage, rotted-out deck, likely non-functional furnace and water heater... where was I going with this? Well... on top of it all, a large portion of non-loadbearing foundation wall has caved in as well.

The good news is that I have been working as an apprentice to a contractor since May. As a bonus, the roof has been replaced a few years ago with quality 30 year shingles. Place has been empty for 7 years, minus the squatters. Cleanup had been interesting. I boarded up the missing cellar door to keep out the "rif-raf". Should be an interesting project. Ill have to post pictures.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 05:45 PM   #119
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by mt999999 View Post
Just an update, while it sure isn't as grand as the Thompson Building, I did just purchase a house with cash. Talked the pastor at the church it was donated to down to a thousand dollars. Minus missing/damaged electrical and plumbing, completely rotted-out windows, plaster damage, rotted-out deck, likely non-functional furnace and water heater... where was I going with this? Well... on top of it all, a large portion of non-loadbearing foundation wall has caved in as well.

The good news is that I have been working as an apprentice to a contractor since May. As a bonus, the roof has been replaced a few years ago with quality 30 year shingles. Place has been empty for 7 years, minus the squatters. Cleanup had been interesting. I boarded up the missing cellar door to keep out the "rif-raf". Should be an interesting project. Ill have to post pictures.
Sounds good, photos will be good but from your description I do have some concerns on the sheer scope of this, the foundation wall is a big concern.
Yeah I know all about the 30 year shingles... I did my roof over with Certainteed 30 year shingles, they failed in about 6 and then I discovered there was a class-action lawsuit over you guessed it- defective shingles.
I got about $1,200 from the class-action administrator which was about a 110% refund on the shingles so to speak in my case, but it doesn't begin to cover the time and all the rest, now I have to replace the ENTIRE roof again which was not what I wanted to do again and is why I used the 30 year shingles instead of the cheap stuff and why I covered the entire deck with that rubberized moisture guard roll used for eaves.
I'm going with the aluminum lock shingles and ordered one square a year ago to look at, but I'm on partial layoff at work and replacing the roof isn't going to happen any time real soon, it will also be a case of having to either do it in two halves over two summers and figuring out how to deal with the ridge vents which will have to be taken off and put back on, taken off again to finish the other half and putting it or a different ridge vent on if I do it this way, or buying all the materials needed before starting.
__________________
Sculpture scholarship recipient, 2008
Asbestos information:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 07:19 PM   #120
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Default

Re: old buildings


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
Sounds good, photos will be good but from your description I do have some concerns on the sheer scope of this, the foundation wall is a big concern.
Yeah I know all about the 30 year shingles... I did my roof over with Certainteed 30 year shingles, they failed in about 6 and then I discovered there was a class-action lawsuit over you guessed it- defective shingles.
I got about $1,200 from the class-action administrator which was about a 110% refund on the shingles so to speak in my case, but it doesn't begin to cover the time and all the rest, now I have to replace the ENTIRE roof again which was not what I wanted to do again and is why I used the 30 year shingles instead of the cheap stuff and why I covered the entire deck with that rubberized moisture guard roll used for eaves.
I'm going with the aluminum lock shingles and ordered one square a year ago to look at, but I'm on partial layoff at work and replacing the roof isn't going to happen any time real soon, it will also be a case of having to either do it in two halves over two summers and figuring out how to deal with the ridge vents which will have to be taken off and put back on, taken off again to finish the other half and putting it or a different ridge vent on if I do it this way, or buying all the materials needed before starting.
There was a small spot that had I minor leak. Just a tiny hole in a shingle the size width of a pencil. Tarred it, and it's all good now. Tarred around the chimney for good measure, but the plaster over the chimney inside is still peeling/cracking. Likely due to the fact that the chimney has no liner or cap, just bare brick. Brick is crumbling up top, gotta tuck-point them and level the top. Needs a cap too. 80% furnace, if it works, still vents up the chimney. Other than the small hole, doesn't seem to be any sign of failure going on 7 years, thank God. Can't afford a new roof. Pictures in posts bellow.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
old foundations new buildings? scttham Building & Construction 2 08-19-2012 09:16 AM
80-year-old apartment buildings, washers, DFU values, FUD WillisBlackburn Plumbing 4 09-18-2011 05:25 PM
Attaching shed style roof between existing buildings. Chutzie Building & Construction 4 07-26-2011 04:16 PM
how to cap an airshaft between two buildings SylvieB Building & Construction 1 07-20-2011 07:24 PM
Energy efficiency of existing buildings Dunc78 Green Home Improvement 1 12-22-2009 09:29 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.