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Old 06-25-2011, 02:05 PM   #16
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Pump jacks


What ron mentioned above is spot on. I've had helpers that once pumped up to second floor height, wouldn't move past the pole or constantly "held on" to the building.
Unless you and your helper are sure with heights, I'd rent a couple poles and planks for one day. You never mentioned how high the roof line is. Someone has to get on the roof to nail the pole brackets on.
Pump up as high as you can, and see how comfortable ya'll feel walking across the walk board. If your knees start knocking, you've wasted your money renting for a week or so.
If the roof is steep, you'll ave to pump the middle pole up higher then the outside one, moving the plank diagonal to get into the gable.

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Old 06-25-2011, 04:23 PM   #17
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The highest point of the gable end is 32 feet. I'll get used to the height, its the equipment that I have to get comfortable with. I just imagine the poles being extremely flimsy or the jack/plank suddenly disengaging and dropping. I'm sure my confidence level will increase once I can actually lay hands on the materials.

As far as connecting the brace/support to the roof... is this something that actually involves walking on the roof? Or can this generally be done from an extension ladder propped against the house?
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:36 PM   #18
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They can be fastened using an extension ladder in most cases. You'll want a ladder set up for easy access to and from the plank anyway.

You'll experience the most sway halfway up, between the ground and the bracket. When you get all the way up, there is very little movement in the poles.

It's important that you get into something solid with the lags supplied with the brackets for optimum safety. Make sure the safety chains go through the planks to prevent them from dropping off the supports when pumping up.

I originally bought 3 set-ups to do a cedar siding job on a house that I framed. I liked them so much, I started sheathing all my framing jobs off of them, then papering and installing windows while they were set up.

I ended up with 12 poles and jacks when it was all said and done.

Since the housing market tanked, they are collecting dust. At least they don't eat much.
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:43 PM   #19
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A 24’ pole off a ladder is no problem, a 30’ pole ( as you need) gets a little more dicey. It really takes 3 people to set 30’+ poles safely.

You got to realize a 30’ pole is extremely top heavy. You want one guy on the roof with a rope tied to the top brace of the pole so he can pull it up. You also have a guy pushing it up. This guy is also steering and guiding the pole so it ends up where it needs to be. The third guy has his foot at the base so it won’t kick out.

If any one person fails their task it can get ugly fast.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:00 PM   #20
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Oh, depending on where you live, I'll rent you 3 of mine for the Summer.
I have 2 with 6' extensions and and a 24' & 20' pic.
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Old 06-25-2011, 09:02 PM   #21
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A 24’ pole off a ladder is no problem, a 30’ pole ( as you need) gets a little more dicey. It really takes 3 people to set 30’+ poles safely.

You got to realize a 30’ pole is extremely top heavy. You want one guy on the roof with a rope tied to the top brace of the pole so he can pull it up. You also have a guy pushing it up. This guy is also steering and guiding the pole so it ends up where it needs to be. The third guy has his foot at the base so it won’t kick out.

If any one person fails their task it can get ugly fast.
A word of advice. If you put an extension on the pole, put it at the bottom. The splice connector ads weight. No need to try standing a top heavy pole. I used to stand poles with a 12' extension at the top. Last time was in 1997 and my neck pain still hasn't gone away. True story.
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Old 06-26-2011, 10:25 AM   #22
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I have 2 with 6' extensions and and a 24' & 20' pic.
I'll give you 1000 bucks for the whole package.
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Old 06-26-2011, 03:25 PM   #23
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i think we would be remiss if we didn't also mentioned that there are also toe kicks,end guards and safety netting that goes with these pump jack systems,whether we as pros use them or not we should mention and encourage their use on a diy forum

fall arrest systems should always be used when working at height
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Old 06-26-2011, 04:32 PM   #24
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if you are going to spend 1.5-2k for the system, please also spend 250 bucks on a proper harness system and climbing rope to tie off.

the extra security gives you one less thing to worry about/distract you.
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Old 06-26-2011, 06:29 PM   #25
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I'm definitely sold now on the aluminum system. You've all been very helpful and informative, thank you!

I'm currently shopping around for the best price. Going to start with two poles (24' + 6' extensions) with 24' walkboard, workbench, endrails and safety net. Will add additional poles/jacks as I work my way to the larger faces of the house. With the peak of the gable at 32', 30' worth of pole should do the job, right? (Plank would be somewhere around 27' and I stand 6' tall.) Or should I invest in larger extensions... say 8' or 12'?
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Old 06-26-2011, 06:52 PM   #26
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6ft will get you there,knowing how to set poles in a gable takes a bit of thought,they need to be close enough together so you can reach the peak,but not so close together that the plank tips up when you walk to one end

sometimes i will set the poles wide work till maximum height,pump back down then reset them closer together to reach the peak,not always but sometimes it's necessary
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:04 PM   #27
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A properly placed 30’ pole will put your feet at about 27’.

you can save some bucks on the work bench by using a old extension ladder. All of my retired extension ladders become new work benches.

What’s the pitch of your roof and how much overhang? A picture of this wall might help with some setup tips.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:05 PM   #28
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A properly placed 30’ pole will put your feet at about 27’.

you can save some bucks on the work bench by using a old extension ladder. All of my retired extension ladders become new work benches.

What’s the pitch of your roof and how much overhang? A picture of this wall might help with some setup tips.
The gable is about 28.5' across and 12' tall. So I assume the pitch is 12/12? There is about 18" overhang all the way around.

I just snapped two photos of the face - one head on and the other from an angle. Hopefully these are helpful. Thanks!
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:52 PM   #29
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The gable is about 28.5' across and 12' tall. So I assume the pitch is 12/12? There is about 18" overhang all the way around.

I just snapped two photos of the face - one head on and the other from an angle. Hopefully these are helpful. Thanks!
That's not an easy house to set up with all the lower roofs and what-not.

Feet can be made to set the poles on above the roof, but you really don't want more pole above the bracket than below. Shorter poles will be needed for that situation.

After seeing those pics, I still would say pumps are the way to go. I'm not sure it's a good idea for it to be staged by an inexperienced person though.

Be careful and think it through to avoid easily averted mistakes.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:54 PM   #30
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BTW, that house is very cool.

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