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Old 11-23-2013, 08:38 PM   #16
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Thanks for the reference. So it can be as low as 18 gauge.

So I guess my next question is, how do you penetrate a steel stud with a screw, but avoid penetrating a nailing plate with that same screw? If you need something that will penetrate a steel stud, but won't penetrate the nailing plate, how is it normally done? Is the slightly thicker gauge of the nailing plate enough to really hold back a screw long enough to let you know it's there?

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Old 11-23-2013, 08:55 PM   #17
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


When I'm working in a steel wall I take in account what you are questioning and try to avoid the stud face as much as possible. Occasionally I'll write pipe locations on the floor but that soon disappears.

The rest is up to the other trades. If it helps any, I have repaired only a few nail holes over the years and have done a lot of steel stud projects
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Old 11-23-2013, 09:02 PM   #18
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Well, those screws need to go through the studs to hold up the trim (in this case a picture rail.) 1 5/8" self drilling screw going through 9/16" trim and 1/2" drywall. I'm trying to figure out how to drill through a metal stud of 20 or 25 gauge while avoiding going through the nailing plate.

This same problem must happen with hanging drywall on metal studs. Let's say a vent pipe comes very close to the edge so that a drywall screw would penetrate it. It could be covered with a nailing plate, but a drywall screw is designed to penetrate metal. Maybe it just won't penetrate 18 gauge, I don't know.
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Old 11-23-2013, 09:14 PM   #19
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


light gauge framing uses a normal metal screw-very sharp points. Structural steel studs use self tappers.
I think you'll notice that it's taking extra time to drill through a nail plate.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:19 AM   #20
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Well, those screws need to go through the studs to hold up the trim (in this case a picture rail.) 1 5/8" self drilling screw going through 9/16" trim and 1/2" drywall. I'm trying to figure out how to drill through a metal stud of 20 or 25 gauge while avoiding going through the nailing plate.

This same problem must happen with hanging drywall on metal studs. Let's say a vent pipe comes very close to the edge so that a drywall screw would penetrate it. It could be covered with a nailing plate, but a drywall screw is designed to penetrate metal. Maybe it just won't penetrate 18 gauge, I don't know.
I would suggest you use your cell phone camera to take pictures with a ruler present prior to drywall. And yes you should be able to tell in drill time if a nail plate is present.
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:54 AM   #21
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Those will eventually drill into the nail plate. Someone will a clue should notice that the screw stops when it hits the plate and not just push harder. The length will protect the cable from being hit.
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Old 11-24-2013, 05:09 AM   #22
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


550.15

(C) Metal-Covered and Nonmetallic Cable Protection. Metal-covered and nonmetallic cables shall be permitted to pass through the centers of the wide side of 2 by 4 studs. However, they shall be protected where they pass through 2 by 2 studs or at other studs or frames where the cable or armor would be less than 32 mm (1 in.) from the inside or outside surface of the studs where the wall covering materials are in contact with the studs. Steel plates on each side of the cable, or a tube, with not less than 1.35 mm (0.053 in.) wall thickness shall be required to protect the cable. These plates or tubes shall be securely held in place.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:11 AM   #23
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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I would suggest you use your cell phone camera to take pictures with a ruler present prior to drywall.
This is an existing structure - drywall has been up for years.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:13 AM   #24
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Those will eventually drill into the nail plate. Someone will a clue should notice that the screw stops when it hits the plate and not just push harder.
Are you saying one can feel the difference between the plate and the standard steel stud?
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:15 AM   #25
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Are you saying one can feel the difference between the plate and the standard steel stud?
yes ... now with that said are we talkin standard metal stud 2x4 ?? or the sturctual studs ??? one you can cut with snipes real easy the other NOT ..
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:27 AM   #26
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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550.15

(C) Metal-Covered and Nonmetallic Cable Protection. Metal-covered and nonmetallic cables shall be permitted to pass through the centers of the wide side of 2 by 4 studs. However, they shall be protected where they pass through 2 by 2 studs or at other studs or frames where the cable or armor would be less than 32 mm (1 in.) from the inside or outside surface of the studs where the wall covering materials are in contact with the studs. Steel plates on each side of the cable, or a tube, with not less than 1.35 mm (0.053 in.) wall thickness shall be required to protect the cable. These plates or tubes shall be securely held in place.
The more appropriate citation would be 300.4 A 1. Yours is specific to mobile and manufactured homes.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:37 AM   #27
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


the one i posted had more detail thats why i used that one ...LOL
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:39 AM   #28
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But it's not enforceable on a "standard" dwelling...and the two codes are different in wording and requirements.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:43 AM   #29
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But it's not enforceable on a "standard" dwelling...and the two codes are different in wording and requirements.

how so ....
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:49 AM   #30
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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yes ... now with that said are we talkin standard metal stud 2x4 ?? or the sturctual studs ??? one you can cut with snipes real easy the other NOT ..
I will try to find that out, thanks.

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