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Old 11-23-2013, 07:21 PM   #1
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


With standard wood studs 3 1/2" wide, holes for electrical cables should be in the center of the stud. I believe 1 1/4" clearance of wood are required on each side of the hole. Therefore a 1" hole in the center of the stud is allowed. If the hole is any closer to one side of the stud, a protective "nailing plate" is required. I believe this needs to be 16 gauge, but I'm not sure.

Now let's say metal studs are used, assuming 20 to 25 gauge. What needs to be done to cables that are closer than 1 1/4"? I've seen metal plates for steel studs with adhesive backing. But I'm a little confused about what they protect. Let's say screws such as these are being used to install baseboard trim, in 1 5/8":
http://www.grip-rite.com/us/en/produ...rilling-screws

Would the plates protect from that?

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Old 11-23-2013, 07:22 PM   #2
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


With standard wood studs 3 1/2" wide, holes for pipes should be in the center of the stud. I believe 1 1/4" clearance of wood are required on each side of the hole. Therefore a 1" hole in the center of the stud is allowed. If the hole is larger or any closer to one side of the stud, a protective "nailing plate" is required. I believe this needs to be 16 gauge, but I'm not sure.

Now let's say metal studs are used, assuming 20 to 25 gauge. What needs to be done to pipes that are closer than 1 1/4"? I've seen metal plates for steel studs with adhesive backing. But I'm a little confused about what they protect. Let's say screws such as these are being used to install baseboard trim, in 1 5/8":
http://www.grip-rite.com/us/en/produ...rilling-screws

Would the plates protect from that?

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Old 11-23-2013, 07:29 PM   #3
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Its a code requirement if someone is stupid enough to screw through a nail plate you can't stop that...
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:30 PM   #4
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


I use standard nail plates on all holes that are too close to the edge.
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:34 PM   #5
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostmaker View Post
Its a code requirement if someone is stupid enough to screw through a nail plate you can't stop that...
I repaired a piece of horizontal cast iron pipe (between studs) that a cabinet guy insisted on drilling into- you think he'd have stopped when he felt resistance
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:36 PM   #6
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
With standard wood studs 3 1/2" wide, holes for electrical cables should be in the center of the stud. I believe 1 1/4" clearance of wood are required on each side of the hole. Therefore a 1" hole in the center of the stud is allowed. If the hole is any closer to one side of the stud, a protective "nailing plate" is required. I believe this needs to be 16 gauge, but I'm not sure.

Now let's say metal studs are used, assuming 20 to 25 gauge. What needs to be done to cables that are closer than 1 1/4"? I've seen metal plates for steel studs with adhesive backing. But I'm a little confused about what they protect. Let's say screws such as these are being used to install baseboard trim, in 1 5/8":
http://www.grip-rite.com/us/en/produ...rilling-screws

Would the plates protect from that?
Don't run your cables where they are more susceptible to being hit….
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:00 PM   #7
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Guys, before this thread gets off track quickly...

Please no advice on where I should run my cables, etc. I am not running cables. I am asking about codes, and about those screws into different gauges of metal. Any references appreciated, thanks.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:02 PM   #8
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Guys, not asking what you would do, or what I should do, or what would be stupid. I'm asking:
- what does the code say
- what would those screws do when they hit a nailing plate vs a lighter gauge stud

Anything related to those questions is much appreciated, thanks.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:05 PM   #9
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
Guys, before this thread gets off track quickly...

Please no advice on where I should run my cables, etc. I am not running cables. I am asking about codes, and about those screws into different gauges of metal. Any references appreciated, thanks.
Other trades should not be using screws that long, you just have to meet the 1 1/4" requirement, that is all….
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:14 PM   #10
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
Other trades should not be using screws that long, you just have to meet the 1 1/4" requirement, that is all….
1 5/8" is standard when going through 9/16" trim and 1/2" drywall. That is actually less penetration than using 1 1/4" drywall screws into 1/2" drywall. You do not have to meet the 1 1/4" requirement if you use "nailing plates".

Do you have any insight into the 2 questions I asked?

Last edited by jeffnc; 11-23-2013 at 08:16 PM.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:18 PM   #11
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
1 5/8" is standard when going through 9/16" trim and 1/2" drywall. Do you have any insight into the 2 questions I asked?


Yeah, don't run your cables where you can't maintain 1 1/4" requirement or nail plate… don't make this more difficult than it has to be….

If I absolutely had no choice, I wold install a much thicker piece of steel to ensure the cables could never/less likely be compromised.

Last edited by stickboy1375; 11-23-2013 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:21 PM   #12
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
Yeah, don't run your cables where you can't maintain 1 1/4" requirement or nail plate… don't make this more difficult than it has to be….
Once again, I am not running any cables.

If anyone has any insight into the specific questions I asked, I'd be appreciative.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:23 PM   #13
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


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Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
Once again, I am not running any cables.

If anyone has any insight into the specific questions I asked, I'd be appreciative.

What do you want to know? This is common sense, if you can't meet the 1 1/4" requirement, then you nail pate, this is where common sense comes in, if you know they are still going to use screws that can penetrate the nail plate, don't run your cables there, or use a thicker piece of steel.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:26 PM   #14
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


2003 UPC, General Regulations 313.9-
Plastic and copper piping run through framing members to within 1" of the exposed framing shall be protected by steel nail plates not less than 18 gauge.

If something more is requested- it is a change order/additional cost. By meeting the above requirement- I have satisfied the code requirements.
If you penetrate my code compliant nail plate- you pay for the repair

I believe gas tubing is different though
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:34 PM   #15
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Protecting cables and pipes in steel studs


Quote:
Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
What do you want to know? This is common sense, if you can't meet the 1 1/4" requirement, then you nail pate, this is where common sense comes in, if you know they are still going to use screws that can penetrate the nail plate, don't run your cables there, or use a thicker piece of steel.
I am not running cables, and I am not nailplating. I have no choice where the cables are run, nor how thick a piece of steel was used. I do not know if those screws will penetrate a nail plate.

If you go back and look at the original post and look for 2 question marks, you will see what I want to know. If you don't know, that's fine, but please stop trying to tell me to be careful where I put my cables.

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