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-   -   Protecting base board on Exterior Wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/protecting-base-board-exterior-wall-156141/)

mect 09-07-2012 06:27 PM

Protecting base board on Exterior Wall
 
So I'm pretty sure this isn't to code, as the wood really doesn't look like it is pressure treated and as such should not be resting against the cement like that, and in fact, seems to be in a pretty odd configuration anyways, but that is what you get I suppose when you have an old house. Anyways, as you can see in the pictures below, there is an exposed board running along our front concrete porch below the siding. It seems like this would be quite unhealthy for the wood, so I'm wondering what the best method would be to protect it. I've been considering running some smart trim along the cement and caulking the whole thing up nice and tight, but wonder if that might present some danger of trapping water inside. It is covered by the roof, but we get a lot of sideways blowing rain here in the fall/spring and warmer winter days. Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated. Also, the wood doesn't seem to be rotted at all (yet), just a little beat up and weathered.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8302/7...7ae193cee3.jpg
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8447/7...909910e69b.jpg

kwikfishron 09-08-2012 07:11 AM

What you have there is always a bad situation and unfortunately we see this all the time. What we should be looking at is at least 6 of concrete or block foundation between the top of the slab and the bottom of the siding.

You are correct that adding trim and caulking it all in will trap water behind the siding. What I do is cut the siding up off the slab and install a Z flashing that goes up under the siding and weather barrier and then down into a kerf that I cut into the concrete.

Ill also run a bead of a polyurethane based caulk like OSI Quad and have the flashing bent at about 100 deg. so it will seat tight into the caulk and on top of the slab.

mect 09-08-2012 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 1005415)
What you have there is always a bad situation and unfortunately we see this all the time. What we should be looking at is at least 6” of concrete or block foundation between the top of the slab and the bottom of the siding.

You are correct that adding trim and caulking it all in will trap water behind the siding. What I do is cut the siding up off the slab and install a Z flashing that goes up under the siding and weather barrier and then down into a kerf that I cut into the concrete.

I’ll also run a bead of a polyurethane based caulk like OSI Quad and have the flashing bent at about 100 deg. so it will seat tight into the caulk and on top of the slab.

Thanks for the advice. The only thing I'm not sure about is what you mean by bending the flashing to about 100 deg. I've put in a (really) rough drawing of how I'm picturing this.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8182/7...393b27f2c6.jpg
http://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAElFTkSuQmCChttp://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAElFTkSuQmCCSo the dark grey is the slab, the blue is the siding/weather shielding, and then brown is the paneling/framing behind the siding, and the light grey is z flashing. When you say bend it to 100 degrees, I assume you are referring the the shorter section that would be extending down into the kerf in the cement. I also assume that I would bend it 10 degrees away from the house so that it is putting tension against the caulk. Is this right?
One other question, when caulking it, would I want to run the bead down in the kerf, or along the top edge of the cement? Thanks again.

kwikfishron 09-08-2012 03:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)
You pretty much have it. :thumbsup:

You bend the flashing slightly off 90 deg so you can push it down onto the slab and end up with a tight seal. If you use 90deg flashing it never seats right.

notmrjohn 09-08-2012 05:04 PM

Nice drawings, both of you. Doesn't matter how rough it is as long as you can see what you're talking about. These communicated perfectly.
mect, that's a bad lookin corner, looks like that lil hump of concrete is funnelling water right into it. When you get some siding off poke the wood back in there with a screw driver to feel if it is soft. Rot likes to grow in dark, damp places. And there is that plywood edge, your gonna have to get the flashing around the corner.
What is the siding? Looks like could be wide painted shingles, then you only have to take off bottom course. Could be plywood, since that's what's on other wall, but thats wide lookin vertical groove. If its solid panel you don't have to take entire panel off. If you can saw it off nice and level a few feet up, you can install siding Z flash there and put back siding piece. May look better and be easier to remove complete panel.

kwikfishron 09-08-2012 05:16 PM

It is possible to do this (the flashing Band-Aid anyway) without removing any siding... success (or not) depends on the operator. :wink:


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