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Old 01-25-2011, 04:16 PM   #1
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Proper nailing for 2x2's under joists


In finishing my basement, I'm planning to install some 2x2s perpendicular to the ceiling joists to get around some copper piping and other stuff thats already up in the ceiling, and potentially use as NM running boards if needed. I'm curious as to the proper way to attach them to the joists. IBC2006 table 2304.9.1 seems the right place to look, but I'm not sure which entry to use. #21 maybe? 3 nails per crossing seems like a lot, but I'd rather do it right the first time.

As a more general question, are you not allowed to use screws at all for doing things like this? 2x2's under joists, 2x4 blocking between joists, etc.


Last edited by jshattoc; 01-25-2011 at 04:42 PM.
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Old 01-25-2011, 06:21 PM   #2
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Proper nailing for 2x2's under joists


Who told you that you can't? Deck screws will work fine, as long as you use ones that are long enough to go far enough into the joist to hold the 2x2. Especially if you are going to be using them to hang Gypsum board on, you want something to secure the furring strips (ie 2x2) to the Floor joists.

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Old 01-25-2011, 06:32 PM   #3
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Proper nailing for 2x2's under joists


Perhaps I'm interpreting the code incorrectly. IBC 2006 2304.9.1 says

"The number and size of
fasteners connecting wood members shall not be less than
that set forth in Table 2304.9.1."

The table then specifies the number and type of nails or staples required for various circumstances. No mention of screws anywhere. Similar wording/table in IRC. I'd think that, then, screws aren't allowed for wood-wood connections. I'm not a pro though, so I could easily be reading this wrong.

If screws are OK for 2x2 furring, are screws ok for 2x4 blocking between joists?
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Old 01-25-2011, 08:10 PM   #4
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Proper nailing for 2x2's under joists


Screws are used all of the time. Nails are also used. It is just that there is a purpose in each along with where and when they are used. Attaching Drywall, you nail the board, but use Screws to secure the panels until you come along with nails along the rest of the panel along the studs & joists. As for what you are doing, you could go with 8d nails, but if it is going to hold a load such as drywall for the ceiling, I would personally use Screws of the proper type & length to secure the strips. Now of course, if you really want to get technical, the best resource is your code office, which can tell you "their" proper way of doing the job you are wanting to do.
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