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Old 02-18-2007, 10:08 PM   #1
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Problem installing entry door


I had a little twist to my attempt to installing a new back door. I haven't done this before but read some articles on the net and the instructions that came with the door and decided to give it a shot. The existing door had huge gaps.

Fortunately, I asked a neighbor who does a little remodeling on the side to look at it before I started tearing it apart. He kept saying that the frame of the existing door was really wide and was kinda puzzled. Then I remembered a comment the previous owner said that the house was built with a 2x6 frame. My neighbor said that I'd then need a pre-hung door built for a 2x6 frame. He said it could be done with the door I bought but it would be a bunch of extra work.

So......I went to Lowe's and they of course didn't have it or know what I was talking about. Do you know where I might find such a rare find? Is it a lot more $ than the standard door?

P.S. I tried to hire a carpenter to do this job last Friday. Long story but I had to leave the house and left him there alone with my dad. I gave the money to my dad to give to him before the job was finished. I came home and the job was a complete disgrace. So, I'd like to try this mself. It was a $170 mistake.

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Old 02-18-2007, 11:11 PM   #2
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Problem installing entry door


What your looking for is a exterior prehung door with a 6 inch jamb ( actually 6-9//16). If your rough opening depth is more than that you will have to add a shim to the interior edge of the door jamb so it sits flush with your interior wall.

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Old 02-19-2007, 07:14 AM   #3
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Problem installing entry door


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Originally Posted by Jemo View Post
P.S. I tried to hire a carpenter to do this job last Friday. Long story but I had to leave the house and left him there alone with my dad. I gave the money to my dad to give to him before the job was finished. I came home and the job was a complete disgrace. So, I'd like to try this mself. It was a $170 mistake.

Obviously not a real 'carpenter'...probably a 'handy-man' type.... (no offesnse to any handy-men......but a 'real carpenter' would have been able to make the installation look 'seamless')

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-19-2007 at 07:29 AM.
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Old 02-19-2007, 07:28 AM   #4
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Problem installing entry door


It can be done, we have had to install 2x4 doors into 2x6 frames and 2x6 doors into 2x4 frames (Home Owner's ordering the wrong size doors -not us-)...

Unfortunately, as you saw when spending your $170.00 - it takes more advanced carpentry skills and the right tools and experience to pull the job off and make it look 'seamless' - like the door was there when the house was built.

Suggestions:

#1) Take your measurements and see if a door can be ordered for that opening as a 2x6 frame.

#2) You could also - ask your local suppliers about DOOR JAM EXTENSIONS. Specifically ones for exterior doors. You can even try a 'door supplier' or do a search online for a supplier....They do make these and also make sill extensions so that the door can be installed towards the inside area of the home.

#3) Last:
.. you could try to make (fabricate) some of your own. With the right tools and some patience, you could figure it out. It really is not that difficult to do. In your situaion, you probably have an exterior sill plate which is attached to the door frame. This sill plate (threshold) needs to be installed with the door to the 'front' of the house for moisture prevention reasons. That would mean that your door jam extensions would be installed 'inside'. These can be installed using shims. You would have to install a threshold extension as well. This too, you could fabricate using a durable material that would match the interior areas (possibly Oak)....

My suggestion out of these 3 - would be to try #2 first...
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Old 02-01-2008, 01:07 PM   #5
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Problem installing entry door


Question: I am a moron homeowner who purchased prehung interior double doors from Home Depot with the incorrect jamb. I needed the 6 9/16 jamb, and Home Depot does not carry this item with the larger size. (I could return them and buy different doors, but they were on sale for $200, and I don't think I can find similar doors for anywhere near that price.)

SO, the question is, what is the best way to deal with this problem on an interior door? The doors are going to close off a small office space that is right off the front entrance.

If I can't find a jamb extension, would it be my best bet to mount the doors so that the smaller jamb is flush with the wall on the front entrance side, (and therefore the most noticable,) and then make the extension on the inside? How the heck would I do that anyway? Would it look odd to just sove the problem with some sort of molding?

Thanks for any help you can give me, especially advice that can at least get me pointed in the right direction.
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Old 02-01-2008, 04:07 PM   #6
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Problem installing entry door


JTMacc99:

Click on this link: Framing around 4" metal pole

The basic method to installing an extension jamb is listed on steps 1 and 2 on this link: http://www.homeimprovementweb.com/in...stallation.htm

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-01-2008 at 04:10 PM.
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Old 02-01-2008, 10:27 PM   #7
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Problem installing entry door


Jemo - best bet is to return the door and get one for a 2x6 wall. I can make it work like some of the others have explained too but there can be problems like the door binding on the wider jam when opened all the way if extened to the inside and the exposed floor getting wet if extented to the out side. JT- interior doors are easy the extend. Is the door frame a 2 piece. if so go ahead and install the side with the doors mounted. Remove 1 screw from each hinge and put in a 3" drywall or deck screw into the stud, use shims and a level! next measure how wide the second half needs to be and with a 1x4 recreate the factory jam that came with the door, just wider. you'll need a table saw. Install that then the trim. I done this on and 10" thick wall once.

Last edited by ididit; 02-01-2008 at 10:33 PM.
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Old 02-02-2008, 06:37 PM   #8
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Problem installing entry door


It makes no sense to buy the wrong door in an attempt to save money. You will spend more in time and materials trying to make it work. Also, there is the possibility that in the end, it won't fit well and then you will waste money on utility bills.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:43 PM   #9
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Problem installing entry door


well like the title said it all...
I was away on work and had to order a new exterior door, I had the width and height of the door right but forgot to get the depth. I had a freind do it for me and ha said it was a 2x6, which is what i ordered.
Is there any way to istall a 2x6 door into a 2x4 frame?
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Old 06-04-2009, 07:06 AM   #10
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Problem installing entry door


You can always take the brick mould off and rip the jambs down to the correct width. The problem will be the threshold. It's questionable whether it could be cut down and still be useable.
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Old 06-04-2009, 12:16 PM   #11
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You can always take the brick mould off and rip the jambs down to the correct width. The problem will be the threshold. It's questionable whether it could be cut down and still be useable.
It would be better to get a new threshold after you ripped the jambs to the correct size.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:39 AM   #12
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Problem installing entry door


Im sure its already done by now but heres my 2c. Id just shim up the out side with 2" material. If you have a brick house the trim will be just about flush with the brick and no one will know the difference. If you have siding then it will take a little more triming to make it look good but its doable. You'll have to cut the siding back enough to install a 2x4 or 2x6 with a rip of 1/2" ply flat around the R.O. Install the ply first so the siding will hide the edge and the 2x will look like wide trim. then install the door with brick mould. Caulk and paint.
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Old 11-14-2010, 11:17 AM   #13
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Problem installing entry door


It is wierd to me that it seems no one here has the correct answer to this. This is a very simple job and lowe's or the home depot are not the people that you should ask, do to the fact that they have no clue what they are talking about. All you have to do is measure the total thickness of your wall, lets just say you have a 2x6 wall that measures 6-9/16" total with drywall and outside sheeting(NOT your siding, the wall sheeting under your siding). You would then buy a frame extension(sold by most that sell exterior doors, you can rip your own but now your aluminum sill plate(threshold) will be short. When you buy an extension it will come with the aluminum sill extension molded to snap fit your aluminum sill plate (threshold)) for a 6-9/16" wall. The name of this product should be listed as a "6-9/16 Exterior door extension w/sill extension". To install this product you will remove the brickmold from the new door frame and install the extension with wood glue and trim nails. The sill plate extension will snap onto the one on your new frame. Now you can put your brickmold back on and install your door. DO NOT make the common mistake of installing a frame extension on the inside of the door, this is the incorrect way to do this and in many cases will cause the door to hit the frame when opened all the way and also you would now have to fix the floor where your old door was due to the fact you would be pushing the door to the outside by about 2". They also make other sizes of frame extensions if needed, I almost always use the 6-9/16 extension because I can cut it down if I have to but you CAN NOT cut the sill extension, if it sticks out I usaully put a trim piece under it to flush it with the house and so it doesn't bend when stepped on.
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Old 11-14-2010, 11:31 AM   #14
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Problem installing entry door


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Originally Posted by JTMacc99 View Post
Question: I am a moron homeowner who purchased prehung interior double doors from Home Depot with the incorrect jamb. I needed the 6 9/16 jamb, and Home Depot does not carry this item with the larger size. (I could return them and buy different doors, but they were on sale for $200, and I don't think I can find similar doors for anywhere near that price.)

SO, the question is, what is the best way to deal with this problem on an interior door? The doors are going to close off a small office space that is right off the front entrance.

If I can't find a jamb extension, would it be my best bet to mount the doors so that the smaller jamb is flush with the wall on the front entrance side, (and therefore the most noticable,) and then make the extension on the inside? How the heck would I do that anyway? Would it look odd to just sove the problem with some sort of molding?

Thanks for any help you can give me, especially advice that can at least get me pointed in the right direction.
Easy, just install a frame extension on the outside of the frame, stain or paint to match original frame. NEVER install frame extensions on the inside of the frame, this will usaully cause the door to hit the frame when opened all the way.

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