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Old 01-16-2012, 12:43 PM   #1
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pouring concrete


when is it to cold to pour concrete?

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Old 01-16-2012, 01:09 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by imogene40
when is it to cold to pour concrete?
Depends on when the plant shuts down if needing a large load, or if you have the equipment to keep the material warm on while it cures.

The newer types can be poured anytime of the year, there really is no bad time, inless you are micing yourself out of bags, then yes there are limits.

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Old 01-16-2012, 01:10 PM   #3
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Above freezing or you need to use thermal blankets.
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
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imogene -

You can pour at any time if you schedule tightly, go fast and protect the placed concrete.

Around here contractors excavate, pout footings, lay block on an entire basement and protect it in about 3 or 4 days (even at -0F). What you have to worry about is the temperature of the soil and the concrete and air temperatures are immaterial if you planned and readied. Protect the concrete for several days with heat or protective blankets. Using high early (Type III) cement is very common as are increased amounts of cement.

Do not disturb any soil with snow on it until the last MINUTE. Snow is a good insulator and maintain the ambient soil temperature. Far too many people get wrapped up in the air temperature from the local TV station.

A good concrete supplier will consolidate deliveries to one or two plants that operate in the winter and have protected aggregates, can use warm mixing water and also have a silo with high early cement.

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Old 01-16-2012, 02:31 PM   #5
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Dick, around here they throw hay or straw down on top of the blankets, then let the snow fall on top. Sweep it off, the hay or stray gets tilled into the ground at the end, when they prep for sod or seed.
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:31 PM   #6
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Dick: What is "high early" cement? thanks. john
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:32 PM   #7
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Types of Portland Cement

Different types of portland cement are manufactured to meet various physical and chemical requirements. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specification C-150 provides for eight types of portland cement.Type I portland cement is a normal, general-purpose cement suitable for all uses. It is used in general construction projects such as buildings, bridges, floors, pavements, and other precast concrete products. Type IA portland cement is similar to Type I with the addition of air-entraining properties. Type II portland cement generates less heat at a slower rate and has a moderate resistance to sulfate attack. Type IIA portland cement is identical to Type II and produces air-entrained concrete. Type III portland cement is a high-early-strength cement and causes concrete to set and gain strength rapidly. Type III is chemically and physically similar to Type I, except that its particles have been ground finer. Type IIIA is an air-entraining, high-early-strength cement. Type IV portland cement has a low heat of hydration and develops strength at a slower rate than other cement types, making it ideal for use in dams and other massive concrete structures where there is little chance for heat to escape. Type V portland cement is used only in concrete structures that will be exposed to severe sulfate action, principally where concrete is exposed to soil and groundwater with a high sulfate content.

http://www.cement.org/basics/concretebasics_history.asp
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Old 01-16-2012, 03:01 PM   #8
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I have poured concrete at -10c I had to Hoard (insulated tarps) and use heaters. For a grade beam use the insulated badment forms (ICF) and cover in the top. Concrete gives off heat as it cures, the ICF forms keep the heat in and you only to to cover the top.
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Old 01-16-2012, 03:05 PM   #9
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Greg: thanks. I'll put that in my "general notes" file. john
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:06 PM   #10
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In other words, you'll save yourself a lot of work and stress if you can wait until Springtime.
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:18 PM   #11
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abracaboom -

Here, going into spring is called waiting or delaying, which costs money to owners and concrete contractors.

Type III cement requires knowledge, planning and attention, but it is cheap in the end since cement is a small cost in the concrete placement cost. In a cold climate, the good suppliers always have it in inventory and in the book of standard mixes.

As usual, it would help if the OP listed their real location instead of inferring it is somewhere "up in the clouds". Other information such as size of the project also help to give reasonable answers.

Dick
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:25 PM   #12
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Quote:
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abracaboom -

Here, going into spring is called waiting or delaying, which costs money to owners and concrete contractors.

Type III cement requires knowledge, planning and attention, but it is cheap in the end since cement is a small cost in the concrete placement cost. In a cold climate, the good suppliers always have it in inventory and in the book of standard mixes.

As usual, it would help if the OP listed their real location instead of inferring it is somewhere "up in the clouds". Other information such as size of the project also help to give reasonable answers.

Dick
If you are in the business, you pour when you have to pour, and take your chances. If you are a DIY home owner, any concrete job can wait until Springtime
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:54 PM   #13
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abracaboom -

That is exactly correct. A DIYer can wait until it is easy and convenient. If there are critical steps in the DIY process, they have to be done to make everything else easier and cheaper.

More information on the scope would make replies more specific to the situation.

Dick
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Old 01-16-2012, 05:08 PM   #14
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Concretemasonary knows a lot and his advice is solid. I used to live 250 miles north of him where it got a bit chilly. Your local supplier can help you as well. Basically, concrete creates heat so you need to keep that heat in and keep the cold out. As mentioned, hay bales and insulated blankets will help, as will the type of concrete you use and whatever additives are available.

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