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Old 12-16-2009, 07:05 PM   #1
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Poured concrete cure time?


I am having a house built and the basement walls were just poured today. It will be between 34-38 degrees for the next couple of days.

When can I expect the concrete to be cured so they can start framing?

thanks for your help!

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Old 12-16-2009, 08:46 PM   #2
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Poured concrete cure time?


I haven't organized these yet. Sorry. http://www.na.graceconstruction.com/...ds/TB_0106.pdf
http://www.springhillks.com/DocumentView.aspx?DID=180
http://www.concretenetwork.com/cold-...te/curing.html
http://www.mrtus.com/pr/pr_gc.asp
Each one had another tid-bit in it. http://www.prairie.com/readymix/cont...oldweather.asp
http://www.deeconcrete.com/concrete/coldweather.asp
http://www.stanleytools.com/default....=left_pros.htm
http://www.100khouse.com/2009/06/24/...b-air-sealing/
Be safe, Gary

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Old 12-17-2009, 06:25 AM   #3
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Poured concrete cure time?


It will take about three days if the concrete is covered as it must be with insulating blankets. You need to retain the heat that is created while the concrete hydrates.
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Old 12-18-2009, 04:59 AM   #4
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Poured concrete cure time?


hopefully your contractor had blankets AND also used recommended cold-weather concreting practices,,, while the conc creates its OWN heat thru chemical reaction, its CRITICAL YOU retain the heat as bob post'd,,, it may be your contractor had calcium OR addl cement added to the mix for hi-early strength gain but that's like thinking there's a man in the moon usually remember, he can't see your house from his house !

conc strength tells you when framing begins & all that's going to be done is nailing sill plates,,, from then on up, its only compressive weight !
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Old 12-18-2009, 06:39 AM   #5
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Poured concrete cure time?


you could start framing today sill plates sub floor and keep right on going. the weight you add is compression and at a gradual amount. wait at least 2-3 weeks before back filling.
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Old 12-18-2009, 09:03 PM   #6
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Poured concrete cure time?


Well they took the forms off today and waterproofed.

Any idea what the orange stuff is at the bottom here and this tube?




Also, why would they pour walls under where the covered front porch would be? Do they need to do this to support the roof over the porch?


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Old 12-19-2009, 07:04 AM   #7
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Poured concrete cure time?


need to support the roof and the porch floor. The tube is an opening to get your water into the building. Do not see any orange thing? Why are you questioning all of this. Do you have an approved plan? did you review the specs giving by the contractor? Now is not the time to be doing your homework. And this is not waterproofing but only damp proofing. An actual waterproofing membrane should be used over this material. If not then you have problems.
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Old 12-19-2009, 07:24 AM   #8
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might better be asking your bldr rather'n us 'cause i don't think you trust him,,, what orange thingie ? code requires 3mm coating for damproof, NOT waterproofing,,, naturally i'd suggest a proper toe drain system but its probably not on the plans,,, MUCH less expensive now than later on.

we use tremco ' tuff 'n' dry ' w/miradain over it together w/filtercloth protected 4" ads pipe leading to daylight OR sump,,, was there a waterstop installed 'tween the footer & fnd walls ?
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:04 AM   #9
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Poured concrete cure time?


Orange stuuf looks like Schluter's Kerdi waterproofing membrane...what it's doing there I don't know - but it's a good product. Used to waterproof shower stalls.
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:21 AM   #10
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Poured concrete cure time?


its a type of drain board (orange stuff) used here in va systems, also helps to protect wall during backfill. Should run to just below finished grade
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:33 AM   #11
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Poured concrete cure time?


Thanks guys, I am just asking questions here because I am interested. I am not questioning my builder's practices, again just curious.
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:42 AM   #12
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Poured concrete cure time?


if thats as high up the wall in your first pick as they are running the board you have problems.I'm thinking thats a brick ledge at the top of the tar, board should run to there and brickledge shold be tarred to above grade

Last edited by tpolk; 12-19-2009 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 12-27-2009, 07:08 PM   #13
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Poured concrete cure time?


I can't offer anything to the concrete question. But I would almost guarantee that the black spray and "orange stuff" is Tremco's Tuff-N-Dri basement waterproofing system. I used to install the stuff and was an in-home warranty service tech for it for about 10 years. That waterproofing consisted of two components. One was an emulsion applied at 60 mils which dried to about 40 mils cured. It was the waterproofing agent. The orange rigid fiberglass panels are a component of that system called Warm-n-dri which served a few purposes. One, reduce hydrostatic pressure, two, to provide for quick drainage of water to the footer drain tile system, and three, to provide basement insulation to reduce condensation on the inside of the foundation walls and to increase comfort. That component had an R-value of 3.1, 5, or 10 based on the thicknesses of 3/4", 1 3/16", or 2 3/8" respectively. Properly applied, it's a pretty good product.

Based on your pictures, I am assuming you have a sloped lot as the top of the insulation/drainage board is usually kept at the estimated level of the finished grade. The only thing that looks different from when I applied the system was that inside the porch enclosure, we usually put the spray and board up to the top of the foundation, but maybe you or your builder specified differently to the waterproofing contractor.

Hope that gives some insight to the "orange stuff" mystery.
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Old 12-27-2009, 09:48 PM   #14
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Poured concrete cure time?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Energyrater View Post
I can't offer anything to the concrete question. But I would almost guarantee that the black spray and "orange stuff" is Tremco's Tuff-N-Dri basement waterproofing system. I used to install the stuff and was an in-home warranty service tech for it for about 10 years. That waterproofing consisted of two components. One was an emulsion applied at 60 mils which dried to about 40 mils cured. It was the waterproofing agent. The orange rigid fiberglass panels are a component of that system called Warm-n-dri which served a few purposes. One, reduce hydrostatic pressure, two, to provide for quick drainage of water to the footer drain tile system, and three, to provide basement insulation to reduce condensation on the inside of the foundation walls and to increase comfort. That component had an R-value of 3.1, 5, or 10 based on the thicknesses of 3/4", 1 3/16", or 2 3/8" respectively. Properly applied, it's a pretty good product.

Based on your pictures, I am assuming you have a sloped lot as the top of the insulation/drainage board is usually kept at the estimated level of the finished grade. The only thing that looks different from when I applied the system was that inside the porch enclosure, we usually put the spray and board up to the top of the foundation, but maybe you or your builder specified differently to the waterproofing contractor.

Hope that gives some insight to the "orange stuff" mystery.


BINGO! Certain foundation contractors use that system as well around here. Normally though, the insulation (similar to Roxul) goes all the way up to the sill plate.

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