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Old 09-25-2008, 08:31 AM   #16
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pour own footers


Having the footings poured below the finished floor is really the proper way to do it.

The block or poured wall is built on the footings. Rock and sand (4" thick and poly) are put in and the floor slab is a 4" poured slab is placed on top of the footing edge projection and over the rock/sand/poly. Many codes require 3 1/2" or 4" of concrete poured against the foundation wall.

This also gets the drain tile down where it does more good. - Inside, outside or both depending on the builder and site.

The wall may be higher, but in many areas, basements are over 8' (maybe 10') clear to the joists. If you use block, you use an extra course or two and some reinforcement. With poured, you use extra concrete and little more reinforcement and higher forms, which may also be used on the low profit short walls. Builders gladly accept the minimal extra cost because of the gains and better use of space.

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Old 09-25-2008, 03:53 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Ahhh, a regional thing. We all definately have different methods across the country. Here, you'd pretty much never see a block foundation on a new home.
There was a time when it was a rare thing to see a poured concrete foundation wall in this area. It is becoming more common, but the construction method is still the same. Trench footer, the same as if it were to recieve a block wall. In most cases the soil will hold it's shape long enough for the concrete footer pour, so forming isn't necessary. Sometimes I see footers with a slot for the poured wall to key into or with rebar projecting to tie the wall. There are a lot of regional driven methods. not necessarily better or worse. Just different means to attain the same ends.
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:12 AM   #18
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I am wanting to build a small shack sort of like a shed to use as a hunting cabin. would I need to pour footers or could I just set some 4x4's in concrete and run floor joist between them and have a space under the floor?
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Old 04-20-2013, 03:19 PM   #19
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Location and size of shack would help us provide useful info.
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Old 04-20-2013, 07:27 PM   #20
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The best thing to do is tell us where your located,and the next best thing is to have a soil test done,before you even think about pouring concrete.
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Old 04-20-2013, 09:03 PM   #21
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Answer to the question is 215 80lb bags if you don't waist any, with a price of $880 and several days of labor

Or you can order 5.5 yards from a supplier, for around $500 to $600. With a few hours or labor.

Code is going to inspect your re-bar before your pour it.
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Old 04-20-2013, 09:04 PM   #22
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http://www.lowes.com/cd_Concrete+Pad...tor_100901113_
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Old 04-21-2013, 03:29 AM   #23
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It will be in Kentucky and it will be a one room building (like a shed) maybe 15x20
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:38 AM   #24
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isn't depth of foundation's top elevation determined by desired 1st floor elevation less desired height of basement useable space less thickness of basement floor less code reqmt of foundation dimensions ? ? ? steel reinforcement's usually required in our work area + we need steelwork ( size, placement, overlap wiring ) inspected & approved prior to ordering conc & covering it up.

to answer your original question, its just simple math - any 5th grader can figure volume if you give him the right dimensions you should certainly feel more comfortable w/them, right ?


you need to be discerning & winnow some of the responses,,, some post bags of pre-blended conc as you asked & some w/transit truck volume,,, you asked the former, not the latter,,, the former's easy -
,67cf per 80# bag OR 2SF @ 4" thick,,, you also asked for bags of conc,,, you didn't ask about portland cement rqmts per ANY mix design,,, at the end of this thread, you may be completely confused,,, i'm happy to help,,, if this response adds further to your confusion, my work's done knowing enough & using the right words when asking questions is also a boon to responders

good luck !
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Old 04-21-2013, 06:26 AM   #25
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Do you not have a set of house plans? They will specify footer size, amount of rebar, etc. that is required.

Though my wife and I built our log home almost entirely by ourselves, the foundation is something we had a contractor do. Too important to risk messing it up.

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