Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-29-2009, 02:46 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


I am planning a small woodworking shop in my backyard (16X20). I want a wood floor so I am planning to use a post and pier foundation. Last summer I build a storage shed (10x12) and essentially built the foundation like a deck with 6x6 posts set in the ground 48". I plan to do the same with my work shop. I used carriage bolts to attached the floor joists to the 6x6 posts. I did not notch out the 6x6 posts. I originally planned to do it again this way on the shop I am building. Is it necessary to knotch out the posts for the joists to sit on and use carriage bolts or are bolts enough to hold it?

Thanks deck

deck99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:32 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Western Ontario
Posts: 62
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


I would notch the 6x6 out. Do it right ,do it once.

joel v. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:41 PM   #3
Master General ReEngineer
 
Bondo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chaumont River, Ny.
Posts: 3,738
Rewards Points: 2,110
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Ayuh,...

With Notching the posts,... Gravity is doing the Job,+ the bolts are 2ndary...

Without Notching,... The bolts are the Only thing holding up your building....
Bondo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:41 PM   #4
Not so new
 
12penny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lehigh Valley, Pa.
Posts: 934
Rewards Points: 504
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Agreed.
12penny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 04:52 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 489
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Why not pour yourself some frost walls and lay out your wood floor on top. It'll be much easier than doing what your doing and you'll have something that will last much longer and performs better.

Josh Jaros
jaros bros. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 05:56 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Josh,
I have thought about pouring a pad. I would need 48 inch footings. It just seems like a lot more work than the post n pier. Do you know of a good instruction source on pouring frost walls? What do you use for the forms?

Thanks,
deck
deck99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 06:02 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 489
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Well, it is hard to tell where you are located but have you though about going with a floating slab. You could throw some radiant in the slab. Depending on your site conditions you might not have a lot of prep work. Slabs are relatively easy to do.
If you are going to pour your own footings, you could use plywood for the forms. They sell ties just for this. Or consider doing some block work on poured footings.
No matter what you do, you will have a much better building than doing what you are thinking about.
Don't forget, build bigger than you think for a shop because trying to move sheet goods around with tools and tables in the way will be very difficult.

Josh Jaros
jaros bros. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 03:30 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


like the person who posted back in 2009, I'm having a small shop (10x10) built for wood working. I use a lathe and it is very heavy. I turn very large pieces of wood - sometimes 400 lbs so there's a lot of torque (is that the right word?). I realize a slab might be preferable in some ways, but I've spent hours working on concrete floors and the resultant foot and leg pain is horrible - even with padded mats. BUT, is it possible to support a heavy piece of equipment that has a lot of front to back movement, with a wooden foundation? Any suggestions? Thanks. OE
ora eloise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 05:54 PM   #9
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,872
Rewards Points: 2,022
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


with a wooden floor or wooden foundation?
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 06:21 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Post N Pier Foundation question.


Forgive my terminology errors, but I think it would be pressure treated floor framing sitting on concrete piers. And then the flooring would be wood - but probably not pressure treated.

ora eloise is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
post foundation budjanet Building & Construction 1 01-18-2009 09:43 AM
Support post question Laser4G63 General DIY Discussions 13 01-09-2009 07:45 AM
foundation question for building a small cabin TNeat Building & Construction 3 08-01-2007 07:08 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.