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Old 05-23-2012, 02:19 PM   #16
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Is this pole load bearing?


There have been very structures like yours built and they carried the roof loads adequately within the allowable stresses without a structural post, but eventually the exterior walls can move out at the top.

Unfortunately you have such a low slope, there is not a way to use "collar ties" that run horizontally well below the peak that are common in higher slope roofs. I don't think you would like some cross members to break up your open ceiling.

From a structural strength standpoint the post, the post was not needed if the builder could live with the complaints from walls spreading. Once the post was put in the design, it picked up loads on the center beam, reduced vertical deflection and became a structural member.

Fortunately, someone put in the post to prevent the lateral movement. Take your post out and you could expect a good chance of movement and cracks, plus the beam may have been sized assuming the post was there.

Without knowing your location and the details of the construction, it is had to make a more educated answer than a local professional can give. A contractor would just make the alterations you want and leave no guarantee unless he was smart enough to have an engineer look at it and avoid future problems.

Dick

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Old 05-23-2012, 05:18 PM   #17
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Is this pole load bearing?


Concrete, I think you are way off on this one. First off, the problem of roofs with low slopes pushing outward on the walls is NOT cured or even addressed by the use of collar ties. Collar ties in high pitch roofs also DO NOT address the issue of outward spreading of walls. Collar ties are used to equalize uplift pressure on the roof during high wind events. Spreading loads on exterior walls are resisted by floor joists in standard framing, not collar ties. For those houses that use ridge beams and rafters or roof trusses, there is no outward thrust generated on the walls by the ridge beam/rafter combination, or by the trusses,hence there is no need for floor joists in those cases.

As to the pole, if it supports load it is a structural element. If the pole is actually holding up the main beam, the function would be to reduce the effective span of the beam, which allows the designer to use a smaller beam because of reduced bending moment in the beam. The pole almost certainly has nothing to do with resisting wall spreading.
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Old 05-23-2012, 06:37 PM   #18
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Is this pole load bearing?


Once the pole (if there is only one) was put in it, took 50% of the vertical load on the beam and the two end points take the other 50% (25% by each). - Excluding a seismic design of an unsymmetrical structure.

It is quite simple that this would allow the lateral thrust to be reduced.

I never said collar ties would work on a low slope roofing structure. That was just an example of what is used elsewhere.

There are few details (size of members, dimensions, location/roof load, etc. to do a design. All he wanted a reason to hire a real engineer or not. I suggested a local professional (not contractor) look at the project. I was just trying to give him some background and warning what could happen if he obeyed his other half by knockng out the support and looking at deflections later.

In over 40 years of experience as a registered engineer and writer of reports and professional articles, I know how to use the words "could", "may", "approximate" and similar terms to avoid liability.

Dick

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