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Old 04-14-2008, 01:34 PM   #1
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


I will shortly begin building my dream barn. I have 2 questions if anyone can help me. I have seen several pole barns built with 2" X 6"s tripled up to make in essence a 6" X 6" post. Is this as strong as a true post? Also, if I poured a concrete column 36" deep and 12" diameter and attached my poles with post brackets at grade, is this as strong as actually setting the post in the ground 36" and filling with concrete? Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. The guys at the saw mill were split about 50/50 on this. So no help there.

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Old 04-14-2008, 03:30 PM   #2
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


3 - 2x6's is not as strong as a 6x6x post . 3-2x6s are only 4.5".

A post set in concrete will be stronger than a concrete foundation with a bracket and post attached to it. It may be adequate, depending on what the building designer needs.

The post in concrete has continuity, but also face durability problems that you always have with wood.

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Old 04-15-2008, 12:06 AM   #3
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


http://www.brandsconstruction.com/in.../page0016.html
Garages and Pole Barns Page May Also Provide Some Information for you.

If the three 2 x 6's referred to are the Newer Style of Treated Material on the bottom with regular SPF Spruce Pine Fir above ground this material of glued boards May be stronger, straighter, and better than solid posts.

There are different anchoring Methods if using the concrete.
Some are worse than posts sunk, some may be close to the same for initial strength. The advantages of the anchors are it may be easier to keep straight and the prevention of rotting from moisture content flexing long term.

Yes - Your ground Level Moisture Content may also be a factor.

Talking With Your Local Building Inspector may be Your Best Source Of Information for your area.

About Home Plans For Free and how find the right home plan.
http://www.homeplansforfree.com/inde.../page0038.html

Garages and Pole Barns
http://www.brandsconstruction.com/in.../page0016.html
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Old 04-15-2008, 07:02 AM   #4
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


I guess my real problem is the 20' I need to obtain from my poles. I can't find 20 plus feet of treated 6x6 posts. Could I use 14' long poles and then attach another 6' post on top of that securing it with steel plates to get my 20'? I there are products out there such as the glulam columns and perma column but these things are expensive. There's got to be a better way.
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Old 05-20-2008, 09:11 AM   #5
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


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Originally Posted by houstonbrama View Post
I guess my real problem is the 20' I need to obtain from my poles. I can't find 20 plus feet of treated 6x6 posts. Could I use 14' long poles and then attach another 6' post on top of that securing it with steel plates to get my 20'? I there are products out there such as the glulam columns and perma column but these things are expensive. There's got to be a better way.
I am not sure where you are located, but while most McCoy's lumber stores don't have it, there is usually one within 75 miles that does. I was quoted $64 each. for treated 6x6 21 feet long.
I was told that larger lumber yards will order longer poles for their customers also. You might call around and ask them?
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Old 05-20-2008, 10:44 AM   #6
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Pole Barn and Poles Question


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Originally Posted by houstonbrama View Post
I guess my real problem is the 20' I need to obtain from my poles. I can't find 20 plus feet of treated 6x6 posts. Could I use 14' long poles and then attach another 6' post on top of that securing it with steel plates to get my 20'? I there are products out there such as the glulam columns and perma column but these things are expensive. There's got to be a better way.
No way to stack posts and retain enough strenth to resist the wind loads your barn will encounter. You must get full-height posts.

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