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-   -   Pole Barn framing... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/pole-barn-framing-93279/)

4020power 01-23-2011 08:14 PM

Pole Barn framing...
 
Hey guys, still in the planning stages of constructing a pole barn to be finished on the inside and used as a home. Does anyone have any input on bookshelf framing? On the exterior wall, instead of running the 2x6's vertical, they are turned 90 degrees and installed horizontal. This allows for the sheet metal to still be attached on the outside and the drywall can be attached on the inside. I believe this would cut down on my framing material. Windows and doors would still be framed in like normal. Any thoughts??

4020power 01-24-2011 01:59 PM

Structurally I dont see a problem with it. It could be a bit more tedious when it comes to plumbing and electrical. These are my thoughts anyways, Anyone else?

Bondo 01-24-2011 02:25 PM

Quote:

still in the planning stages of constructing a pole barn to be finished on the inside and used as a home.
Ayuh,... I don't see a problem with it, but I'm guessin' there'll be a Pile of Code issues with living in a Pole Barn....

4020power 01-24-2011 02:27 PM

Not where I live :thumbsup: Thanks for the input

masterofall 01-24-2011 03:29 PM

The concept is confusing for a few reasons. Why a pole barn first? Your framing in the walls anyways so to start off with a difficult structure seems counter productive. If you want to frame the walls horizontally there will be a sag problem that must be dealt with and can be remedied in many ways. I would still frame vertically and then attach a counter batten for better insulation and a reduction in thermal bridging. The windows and doors need not be framed the same as the built up beam for the roof is carrying the load so there is no need for a header.
What are you doing for a floor? A slab on grade that supports the poles by surrounding them brings up problems of rot.
The reason we use wood frame construction so much is because it is an inexpensive (think time) dynamic and versatile way to build a structure. If other means were less expensive we would be using them. Think time again. Bales of straw are cheap but the labour to build a house with them and finish them reduces its popularity
Climate and location is possibly a reason for your choice.
More info SVP

4020power 01-24-2011 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by masterofall (Post 577026)
The concept is confusing for a few reasons. Why a pole barn first? Your framing in the walls anyways so to start off with a difficult structure seems counter productive. If you want to frame the walls horizontally there will be a sag problem that must be dealt with and can be remedied in many ways. I would still frame vertically and then attach a counter batten for better insulation and a reduction in thermal bridging. The windows and doors need not be framed the same as the built up beam for the roof is carrying the load so there is no need for a header.
What are you doing for a floor? A slab on grade that supports the poles by surrounding them brings up problems of rot.
The reason we use wood frame construction so much is because it is an inexpensive (think time) dynamic and versatile way to build a structure. If other means were less expensive we would be using them. Think time again. Bales of straw are cheap but the labour to build a house with them and finish them reduces its popularity
Climate and location is possibly a reason for your choice.
More info SVP

Thanks for the feedback.

In my opinion, building a house this way is tremendously cheaper than a stick built house. Plus, I think they are so much more better looking than a brick and mortar house, to each his own I guess.

Normally, a pole barn has girts on the outside, then walls are framed in between the barn poles when building exterior walls. Putting the girts horizontal between the post would eliminate almost half of my material on the exterior wall, I think.

The amount of labor required to dry in a 4000 sq ft pole barn compared to a 4000 sq ft house isnt even comparable in my opinion. The pole barn is so much easier.

All the post will be coated before putting in the ground.

You are correct about the doors and windows.

I am located in Oklahoma, pretty mild winters, very humid and hot summers.

Once again, I love the look of this type of house and I think it will come at alot cheaper .

Thanks again for the feedback.

jomama45 01-24-2011 05:39 PM

I think you're biggest challenge in this is going to be getting a pole barn style construction to pass strict dwelling codes, especially those relative to wind. A non-habitable detached structure doesn't need to typically meet this same kind of scrutiny.

I completely understand what you're going for here, as pole building are fairly common here. I can't ever recall one that was built primarily for a residence, all though some have had portions reserved for living quarters. I highly doubt the ones with living quarters were approved by code though, and were likely added after the building occupancy inspection.

As for more info on pole building construction & feasability, I would highly reccommend meeting with a manufacturer or two. At least here, these guys build pole buildings for extremely competively, as they usually produce there own sheet goods, spec their own columns, girts, trusses, etc... saving them a ton of money on a middle man.

4020power 01-24-2011 05:49 PM

Thanks Jomama for the reply and info.

Where I am located, it wont be a problem with codes. I'll be around the 10th or 11th person in about 10 sq miles to put up a pole barn for a house. And these are some nice houses. My cousin finished his last year and had close to $400K in his. A $20 flood plain inspection was all that was needed from the county. We never saw another agent from the county again, no code inforcers,inspectors, nothing. Its nice not having big brother breathing down your neck. I do realize some hacks need big brother looking after them, lol. Thanks again:thumbsup:

masterofall 01-24-2011 07:59 PM

Good luck. Building is so localized. I used to live in Nepal when it was a Kingdom. Just rocks mud and a pole framed thatched roof. Galvanized metal or slate for the wealthy.
I would like to see one of these pole barn houses

jomama45 01-24-2011 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4020power (Post 577154)
Thanks Jomama for the reply and info.

Where I am located, it wont be a problem with codes. I'll be around the 10th or 11th person in about 10 sq miles to put up a pole barn for a house. And these are some nice houses. My cousin finished his last year and had close to $400K in his. A $20 flood plain inspection was all that was needed from the county. We never saw another agent from the county again, no code inforcers,inspectors, nothing. Its nice not having big brother breathing down your neck. I do realize some hacks need big brother looking after them, lol. Thanks again:thumbsup:

More power to you!

I don't see pole building const. as a non-viable choice, but where you're at, I'd certainly consider a safe room or cellar of some sort. Otherwise, I'm sure there's good value in what you want to do.

nap 01-24-2011 09:33 PM

Where's Dangermouse when you need him? He has the answers and yes, it is possible to live in a pole building, with caveats.

4020power 01-25-2011 09:41 PM

Thanks for the info guys, going to do some more research on this.

4020power 01-27-2011 06:23 PM

Do you guys think this truss is suffcient enough for my ceiling and HVAC? This was what the truss company came up with, 20-5-5 thats with a 2x6 TC and 2x6 BC at 4' O/C and a 52' span. All the info I could find for Oklahoma said to use IBC 2003 at 5 psf - 20 psf

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b2...man/truss2.jpg


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