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Old 02-01-2012, 10:55 AM   #1
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Please help, I need your advice!


Hello guys,
This is my first post guys and I think I came to the right place. Here is my situation; I have a Steel Pole barn approximately 80’x140’. It’s was constructed in 2001. The barn was used as an indoor riding arena for horses thus, it has dirt floor. There are some issues with dust kicking up and wind coming through the gap where the roof meets side panels. And so on but no big deal.
Here is a little on my background; I restored my current home (1870’s farms house) removing all the lath and plaster and replaced them with Drywall along with all the plumbing and electrical work. I am good with my hands and have access to all kind of tools. I have plenty of help too but at this stage, not enough money to hire a contractor so I am going to tackle this myself with my buddies.
Well I am a car guy that is the reason I bought this old Farm with new buildings. What I want to do is; enclose a section with in the barn approximately 30’X70’ to just store about 12 cars, of course with concrete floors, drywall and all the goodies.
Here is my dilemma; I want to do this with a flat celling/roof so that I can walk up top and store car parts, the Pole barn itself is pretty tall so even with 8 or 9 foot celling in the new construction area, I will still have enough room left up top to walk around and store stuff. How do I construct this? I have a lot of 2x8’s 2x10 and 2x12’s from all the horse stalls that I am tearing down from my other barn. What I need is to utilize some of that good wood and save some money. I know that using the steel beams might be the right choice but funds are low and I am trying to do this without the Boss (wife) knowing.
1) How do I support the joists for the celling so that I can store stuff up top?
2) I assume 30 feet across is too long without having a support in the middle so where do I put the supports? Every 10 feet? Or right in the middle at 15? Mind you, I have to parks cars in there so less poles/supports in the middle would be better.
3) Where can I get a construction drawing or an idea without going to an Architect as to how many feet the joists should be a part?
4) Should I run 2X10’s every 10 feet and use 2x8s or 2x6’s in between? What is the standard rule? I am not so worried about the codes and what not but I want to make sure my cars are safe down below.
I am so sorry for all these crazy questions but I need to start this soon!

TIA
Prasad


Last edited by WICKED V6; 02-01-2012 at 10:58 AM.
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Old 02-01-2012, 11:39 AM   #2
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Please help, I need your advice!


Pictures would be good, but you might also want to check with the manufacturer for their recommendations.

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Old 02-01-2012, 01:02 PM   #3
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Please help, I need your advice!


One thing I forgot to mention was that one side of the new construction will be tied into the existing structure of the Pole barn. I believe it has 8x8's every 8 or 10 feet. So as you walk into the barn ( I have a 10x10 opening in the middle up front) it will be the whole left side 30' wide 70' deep.

I don't have any pics right now, my barn is filled with cars and I don't think it will be a good idea to post that image on the net..lol.
HTH
Prasad
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Old 02-01-2012, 01:24 PM   #4
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Please help, I need your advice!


You need to hire either an architect or a structural engineer to design this for you. Seriously, you are planning a major project, you are going to be storing valuable items, and some of these items are heavy. What are you possibly going to do with design information offered by an internet chat group, from people who have never seen your site, and almost certainly have not built anything comparable?
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:08 PM   #5
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Please help, I need your advice!


I AM NOT an architect or engineer. But it sounds like you will be framing a building within a building. The ceiling of the new building is essentially a deck (or second story of a house.) When I built my deck, I started with two books. I think one was from B&D, the other from Taunton (?) They had joist span tables. I'm not looking at one, now, but wouldn't be surprised if a 2x12 will span 15 feet. Of course that central support beam may need to be engineered laminated lumber. 70' of that won't be free.
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:42 PM   #6
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Please help, I need your advice!


Thanks guys for all of your input, I am going to look into it.

Prasad

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