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-   -   Please Help! Deck Issues (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/please-help-deck-issues-9252/)

llcooljayce 06-18-2007 10:08 PM

Please Help! Deck Issues
 
Hey guys,

I am one of those guys that is trying to save some money and impress their wife at the same time and I have decided to build my own deck. Here's the problem ... I'm doing it myself (we just moved to the city) and I'm running into a few problems right at the get go:

1. This is a walkout house so the deck is 8 feet in the air and the land is sloping away from the house. I am finding it very difficult to cut the 6x6 posts to the right height to allow for the beam

2. The beam is a 22' long beam made up of various lengths of 2x10. There are three boards total but I have a few points where the beams aren't exactly even ... is it a problem when I get the beam up if only 2 of the three beams are touching the post?

For problem 1, I am looking for either an easy way to do it or some sort of adjustable post (telepost) ... like the ones you find in your basement. I know there are adjustable post bases but I have already poured the concrete and its too late for that. So basically I'm just looking for the top of telepost ... any suggestions on where to find them?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

AtlanticWBConst. 06-19-2007 06:15 AM

Oh my.............


my, my, my.....


Dude, ALL your structural and load bearing lumber members, ESPECIALLY the post and beams, MUST BE directly and solidly (touching) and supporting eachother. It is KEY to building anything that will support any kind of weight. Not to mention the weight of your loved ones.....

For a 22' beam, you should be using 12 to 16 footers, not 10'-0"s. We usually build the deck-frame in place, using strong temporary supports. This allows the ability to then (after the frame is completed), take extremely accurate measurements for the beam and the posts lengths required. These are then pre-cut and put into place using proper attachment methods (and the right amount of help to muscle it all up).

Please tell me that you spent alot of time researching, planning and drawing up this deck. Please tell me that your footings, beam and post stock are all strong enough to support this structure and any live load to be placed on it. Please tell me that you have it properly attached and flashed into your home. Please tell me that you are using all IBC code approved fasteners and bracket attachments.....

RYANINMICHIGAN 06-19-2007 09:24 AM

I am not so sure building a second story deck with basicaly no knowlage is a BAD idea. People get hurt when thigs are 8 feet in the air and built by someoone that just winged it.. Sorry

Joe Carola 06-19-2007 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RYANINMICHIGAN (Post 49635)
I am not so sure building a second story deck with basicaly no knowlage is a BAD idea. People get hurt when thigs are 8 feet in the air and built by someoone that just winged it.. Sorry

I wouldn't be sorry at all. This is a DIY'er forum and there a lot of things that DIY'ers can TRY! This is not one of them!

Lifting a 22' beam 8' up in the air is STUPID,DANGEROUS AND NOT A DIY'ER THING TO DO!.

I'm a Framing Contractor for over 20 years and I would never try that myself.

There are some things that are just NOT for a DIY'er, plain and simple!

This guy has to find someone who knows what the hell they're doing and help him even if it costs a few bucks because him trying to save a buck and impress his wife could get him hurt or kill him. How much money will he save if he breaks his arms or legs and can't work. Get some help and do it the RIGHT way and SAFE way. It's that simple!

RYANINMICHIGAN 06-19-2007 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by llcooljayce (Post 49591)

2. The beam is a 22' long beam made up of various lengths of 2x10. There are three boards total but I have a few points where the beams aren't exactly even ... is it a problem when I get the beam up if only 2 of the three beams are touching the post?

i am not sure how this is even possible.....

AtlanticWBConst. 06-19-2007 10:56 AM

:eek: ... scary ...

(years ago) It took 4-5 strong guys to get this 18 foot beam, and then the posts, in place, and it was only about 4.5 feet off the ground (everything pre-planned, pre-measured and pre-cut):

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...oduceetc-1.jpg

KUIPORNG 06-19-2007 11:42 AM

This is very nicely built....Atlantic... I know this is kind of redundant comment...

I intend to try my 1 feet high deck though next year....

AtlanticWBConst. 06-19-2007 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 49652)
This is very nicely built....Atlantic... I know this is kind of redundant comment...
I intend to try my 1 feet high deck though next year....

Thanks, the only issue is the 9" sono tubs, which were acceptable 7 years ago, when we built that. We now do minimum 12" dia. tubes or larger (based on soil and structural loads).

llcooljayce 06-19-2007 01:17 PM

Guys, I appreciate the concern but I'm not dumb enough to try and lift a 22' beam by myself. What I'm really wondering is the best way to make sure the posts are all the same level when you are dealing with uneven ground

Ron6519 06-19-2007 01:18 PM

Sorry, you're not going to impress the wife today. Maybe kill her, but not impress. This is so far above your skill level, continuing it will constitute negligence.
Impress her by calling in someone who knows what they're doing and who will not kill her.
Ron

KUIPORNG 06-19-2007 01:30 PM

I saw other thread using the techinque like build the outside surrounding frame first using the method.... make the post longer than suppose to be.. or use it as extended post... then screw (with nuts) the board on to the post... make the board level then cut the post ... or use the post as extended post.... once you got the outside frame... the inside beam/post can be setup measure easily (as you already establish a point of reference) I supposed... this is all from my mind as I never done it before though...

NateHanson 06-19-2007 02:47 PM

You could use a water level to get the posts cut close to level.

I'm sure there are a million books written for DIYers building their first deck. If you don't have one, you really should get one. I'm sure it will cover issues such as this, and others you're bound to encounter.

Nate

crecore 06-19-2007 03:05 PM

I dont like to see generalizations about what DIYers can and can't do. I appreciate everyones concern and while we should certainly point out safety and code concerns we should be careful not to deter the DIY part of the DIY'er. :)

That being said, I have installed a double 2x12 LVL 36 feet long by myself with nothing but ladders, 2x6 props, straps and a hammer. It can be done. Is it dangerous... well, it's a calculated risk. Take your time, plan it out, be smart, have some engineering and rigging background and you can probably show a pro a thing or two. Should or can everyone do this, of course not.

Anyway, on this one Atlantic of course is a pro and is spot on as usual.

DIY, I would Flash, put up several joists, lift beam (with some sort of equipment preferably), level/square, build temp supports, finish frame, level/square again, plumb bob to ground, install footings, measure and cut beams, install, level/square again, deck, rail.

Jeekinz 06-19-2007 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by llcooljayce (Post 49663)
Guys, I appreciate the concern but I'm not dumb enough to try and lift a 22' beam by myself. What I'm really wondering is the best way to make sure the posts are all the same level when you are dealing with uneven ground

Get all the posts in place and use a string level and chalk line to mark them all at once. Then use a sawzall or circular saw to make the cuts.:thumbsup:

KUIPORNG 06-19-2007 03:45 PM

If you get all the posts in places... then cut them when they are erected... how do you cut them when they are 8 feet high and it probably vibrate also when you cut them.... do you mean take them down again then cut them on the ground...


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