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-   -   Plate glass windows in 2nd floor loft? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/plate-glass-windows-2nd-floor-loft-7181/)

kcrossley2 03-17-2007 08:14 PM

Plate glass windows in 2nd floor loft?
 
3 Attachment(s)
I'm considering installing floor to ceiling plate glass windows in a second floor loft (see photo). My wife and I have decided to make this area a kid's game room with Xbox, computer, TV, couch, etc., but she is very concerned about the risk of people falling over the railing. I understand her concerns, but I don't want to lose the openness of the area. Plus, plate glass would also provide a noise barrier as well.

Do you think glass is a good solution? If so, how much would something like this run? The space is approximately 10' wide x 7.5' high.

Thanks.

fhivinylwindows 03-17-2007 08:48 PM

Your best bet would be to decide what you want the glass to do for you first. You might want thick glass or double pane glass to control some of the noise. Or you might want to hear the kids play? Do you want tinted glass or clear glass? You will need tempered glass so the glass does not break when the kids beat on it. Other thoughts are how you want the glass framed (wood, metal or frameless). Since the area will be covered with a few separate sections, how do you want them joined?

Sorry to be all questions and no answers.

kcrossley2 03-17-2007 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fhivinylwindows (Post 37329)
Your best bet would be to decide what you want the glass to do for you first. You might want thick glass or double pane glass to control some of the noise. Or you might want to hear the kids play? Do you want tinted glass or clear glass? You will need tempered glass so the glass does not break when the kids beat on it. Other thoughts are how you want the glass framed (wood, metal or frameless). Since the area will be covered with a few separate sections, how do you want them joined?

Sorry to be all questions and no answers.

Okay, let's see.

1. I'd like thick glass, but I'm a little concerned about the weight.
2. The kids are older, so I'd rather not hear them play.
3. I'd like clear glass.
4. Yes, tempered glass is a must.
5. As far as framing, I'd like whatever is the strongest.
6. I don't know how the sections are normally joined, but I'd prefer a seamless installation if possible.

I hope that helps.

kcrossley2 03-25-2007 09:25 AM

Any more ideas on this?

fhivinylwindows 03-25-2007 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcrossley2 (Post 38257)
Any more ideas on this?

Sorry, generally I will hit "new post" and sometimes forget to look at my past post.

Your best bet would be to talk to a custom glass shop about your requirements. I have used some 3/8" tempered tinted glass before and it weights a ton. Double and triple pane glass works well but I have not seen a seamless application before with it. Another option would be to build a knee wall and install some fixed panels or sliding panels.

Since your project will cost a small mint using the glass that best fits your needs is key.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-25-2007 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fhivinylwindows (Post 38277)
....
Since your project will cost a small mint using the glass that best fits your needs is key.

As stated, be prepared for the estimate from a glass shop on this...

oberon 03-30-2007 07:31 PM

laminated
 
You want laminated glass.

Laminated glass is a safety product that meets every code requirement that tempered meets and in your application it is better than tempered because if tempered gets broken it leaves an opening that could result in serious injury.

Laminated glass may break from an impact, but the glass stays adhered to a flexible plastic interlayer and, most importantly, stays in place. No opening that someone could fall thru.

In addition, laminated glass has better sound characteristics than either typical double or triple pane glass. Laminated glass is used in airports and in homes near high noise areas to block unwanted sounds from passing thru the windows.

Laminated glass isn't cheap, but based on your requirement it is by far the best choice.

Depending on the type of interlayer, laminated glass may be considered to be a structural product - unlike standard annealed. Laminated glass is being used to protect buildings from the effects of bomb blasts. In fact, engineers and architects are specifying laminated glass as the outer envelope on many new building and renovations of public buildings that may eventually be at risk of attack.

Laminated glass is used in zoos for enclosing gorillas or other large animals that may test the strength of the enclosure.

Another option would be to use polycarbonate sheets which would be relatively easy to install, relatively lightweight, and very impact resistant - much more so than glass. But, sheets this size would also be very expensive - and the are more prone to aesthetic damge such as scratches than is glass. They can become very unattractive rather quickly in the "right" environment. But, plastic can be a definite possibilty for your application.

kcrossley2 03-30-2007 07:42 PM

For an opening this size, about how much do you think the options you suggested would cost?

oberon 04-01-2007 07:10 PM

Depends a lot on where you are of course, but laminated glass could run from maybe $6 sqft up to $25 - or more - a sqft depending on glass and/or interlayer thickness.

Polycarbonate will cost somewhere about $10 - $15 sqft again depending on thickness.

I would strongly suggest contacting a local glass shop to get pricing. I think that my estimates are close, but I don't regularly buy either product so I could be off a good bit.

kcrossley2 04-01-2007 07:29 PM

oberon, thanks for the reply. The opening is about 12' wide by 6' high or 72 sq. ft—if my math is correct, so with the Polycarbonate would that be about $1,080 installed?

Do you think this is a good solution to maintain the openness of the space or am I better off just building a wall?


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