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Old 01-08-2012, 02:30 PM   #1
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


This is my first post so let me know what is lacking. I am located just north of San Antonio, TX. I live in a house built in the early '70s. Once I moved in, I removed the carpet ( had lumps) and discovered there is concrete over the sheathing. The lumps were from cracks in the concrete and the resulting sides of the crack rising. There are no visible cracks in wals or ceiling sheetrock. I am considering putting down a solid floor ( engineered wood ). The concrete appears to be about 1 to 2 inches thick.
This brings my questions:

1) Is this a common practice ( concrete over the plywood sheathing )?

2) Should I remove the concrete where possible or cutout/remove the bad places and repour concrete in those areas?

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Old 01-08-2012, 02:56 PM   #2
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


No clue why anyone would have tryed to use concrete inless there were thinking of staining it and using it as finished floor. Or someone did an old style mud bed to lay tiles.
Some times you will see a small amount that used as a floor leveler, but not that thick.
May want to touch base with a flooring company that's local to look at this.

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Old 01-08-2012, 02:56 PM   #3
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


I can't say if this is common in San Antonio, I have never seen it. But then again, there are lots of things I haven't seen. You are likely to have all sorts of trouble installing wood over concrete, in terms of nailing or gluing in place. If the subfloor below the concrete is adequate, you could simply remove the concrete and install the wood flooring above the subfloor. If the subfloor is not adequate, you could remove the concrete, install a proper subfloor, then install the wood floor above.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:04 PM   #4
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


You have a 'bright idea' job there----I'm old and wrinkled and never heard of that one!

Daniels suggestion sounds good to me--peal off the mess--add another layer of fresh underlayment and move on to your finished floor.

Just hope that was not used to level up some bad construction---Mike---
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:21 PM   #5
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


Yeah mike that is what I wonder, Is the floor unlevel and it was used to level it? Or is there in floor heating in it?
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:26 PM   #6
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


He's in Texas there---but I suppose those folks might want some heat---I can't imagine why--but they could---

I haven't turned on my boiler yet--the wood burner has been enough---
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:52 PM   #7
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


We built apartments that way here, up until the early '80's. Very good for sound control and fire code. Just patch the concrete. Original is called air-entrained or "light-weight" much lighter on the joist system, "Google" it...... We used a fir bottom plate on the p.t. lower one (1-1/2" thick). Added builders paper on 5/8" non-T&G plywood.....Lol.

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Old 01-10-2012, 09:48 AM   #8
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


How old is the house?

Our last house was pier and beam. The beams and joists were undersized, and probably green when built. The floor sagged. If you have thin concrete at the edges and thick in the middle, perhaps someone filled in a sagging floor. If the structure wasn't designed for the purpose, it would flex and fail.
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Old 01-11-2012, 03:09 PM   #9
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


I appreciater all the feedback. There is no radiantheating in the floor.

Pyper, the best I can tell is the house was built in thel 1970's -so 40+ years old. I will get under and see size was used for the joists and the span between joists.


GBR in WA: Is there any specifics on the light weight concrete to use for patching?? This sounds like a good way to go considering all the cracks I am seeing on the floor.

Bob
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Old 01-11-2012, 04:23 PM   #10
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


Try and cut out and replace the concrete if you have those skills. If you can't do it yourself, you will probably waste a lot of money paying someone else to try and fix it. In that case I would just live with it.
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Old 01-12-2012, 05:32 PM   #11
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Pier and Beam Subfloor


I’d use a patch that could handle movement as that is probably what caused it to crack. I’ve replaced/removed sections before---- very labor intensive; just fill the bottom if worried. As long as the crack is narrow enough that it won’t affect the flooring above by a weak spot, something elastic.

Gary

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