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-   -   Over 8 Foot Wall - Method of Applying Sheathing... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/over-8-foot-wall-method-applying-sheathing-3223/)

MoparAutoworks 07-27-2006 11:36 PM

Over 8 Foot Wall - Method of Applying Sheathing...
 
The project I'm currently working on has 10 foot sidewalls. Useing 8 foot tall OSB, what is the recomended way to handle this?

I'm assuming it is acceptable to apply the 8 foot sheets to the walls then fill the remaining with two foot pieces. Is this an acceptable method or is there a better way?

This only comes into affect on the side walls, not the gable end walls.

Thanks, Adam

Bonus 07-28-2006 01:25 AM

Apply the sheathing horizontally as per usual, with 1" gaps. 2 1/2 rows and it's done. Sheathing is designed to be laid horizontally not vertically. It probably doesn't matter if you're in some corner and you put a piece in vertically, but if you're considering the whole job do it the way the engineers speced it and everyone will be happy. Anyway, it's easier and faster. :thumbsup:

MoparAutoworks 07-28-2006 08:53 AM

Thanks for the advice. I never thought about even doing it that way. I have seen it applied horizontally before.

Typically around here though I have applied it, and seen it applied vertically. I guess I never gave it much of a though. :confused1:

Thanks, Adam

Joe Carola 07-28-2006 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus
Apply the sheathing horizontally as per usual, with 1" gaps. 2 1/2 rows and it's done. :thumbsup:

1" gaps, where?

IHI 07-28-2006 05:09 PM

All of the jobs are typically done vertially here since OSB is the sheeting of choice and it's uni directional so it makes no difference it you run it horizontally or vertically.

When buidling tip up walls laying it horizontally works pretty well, if walls are constructed and easy to reach at ground level it's typically installed vertically.

If you want to really make life easier, install your filler at the bottom then set your full sheets on top of that.

Bonus 07-28-2006 07:29 PM

" 1" gaps, where?"

It's code here to leave 1" horizontal gaps in the sheathing to allow for moisture escape. This is generally done between the first and second sheets, so you wind up with a 1" gap running around the building at 4'. I take it this isn't common elsewhere?

MoparAutoworks 07-28-2006 11:09 PM

Thanks guys. Good tip on putting the pieces on the bottom. May have to give that a try.

Bonus,

I have never seen this done, or done this around here at any rate.

Thanks, Adam

Joe Carola 07-31-2006 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus
" 1" gaps, where?"

It's code here to leave 1" horizontal gaps in the sheathing to allow for moisture escape. This is generally done between the first and second sheets, so you wind up with a 1" gap running around the building at 4'. I take it this isn't common elsewhere?

Your right! I've never heard that before. We just put a nail beetween the sheats and run them horizontally and it doesn't matter how tall the wall is whether it's 8', 9' or 10', we start at the bottom where the sills are and go from there.

Bonus 07-31-2006 09:40 PM

Joe, that sounds good to me and always did til I got called on it once and had to go around the building 'retro-creating' the 1" gap.:furious: Now I put it in every time. It really doesn't make much diff, just a nail at 1" or not, doesn't slow anything down. Rich.

Joe Carola 08-01-2006 06:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus
Joe, that sounds good to me and always did til I got called on it once and had to go around the building 'retro-creating' the 1" gap.:furious: Now I put it in every time. It really doesn't make much diff, just a nail at 1" or not, doesn't slow anything down. Rich.

I guess it's a regional thing.

KenTheHandyMan 08-02-2006 08:58 AM

He is in Canada you know :wink: LOL

manhattan42 08-02-2006 01:54 PM

Must be peculiar to Canada.

US energy codes require all gaps in structural sheathing in the thermal envelope to be sealed.

Otherwise you increase the likelihood of moisture condensing in the wall cavity and create a less energy efficient wall assmebly in the process.

Bonus 08-02-2006 10:37 PM

I'm not in Canada you know, I'm in Canada, eh? :)

" US energy codes require all gaps in structural sheathing in the thermal envelope to be sealed.

Otherwise you increase the likelihood of moisture condensing in the wall cavity and create a less energy efficient wall assmebly in the process."

Yeah, it's curious that we have two opposite ideas with the same outcome in mind. The inspectors here insist that this is to allow moisture that makes it through the VB to escape.

MoparAutoworks 08-05-2006 09:25 AM

That is definately an interesting aspect.

Adam

Daryl 08-20-2006 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KenTheHandyMan
He is in Canada you know :wink: LOL

right on..... eh...

LOL


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