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-   -   out of level facia (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/out-level-facia-153040/)

scottvlee 08-08-2012 07:42 AM

out of level facia
 
I have a 20x20 garage with old exposed soffits and 2x4's protruding from the roof structure. I am going to install fascia and soffit. my problem is the front of the garage is out of level up to three inches from side to side and the soffit area as well. how do I correct this problem the garage door opening will be level so the fascia needs to match or it will look out as well. how can I correct it to make the fascia look reasonably level?

AGWhitehouse 08-08-2012 08:25 AM

Use plywood and taper cut it so the dimensional difference is hidden within the fascia...

joecaption 08-08-2012 08:36 AM

I'd first take a look at what's causing it. If it's just the rafter tails cut wrong it's a simple fix, the roof starting to sag then better get it fixed before it comes down, whole building settling then your out of luck.
Not sure I would ever use plywood for a fashi, but a wider piece of 3/4 pine cut at a taper would sure work.
The reasons I would not use plywood is it only comes in 8' lengths, your going to have to many seams. Very good chance it's going to delaminite because of the end grain being left exposted.

AGWhitehouse 08-08-2012 08:45 AM

Typically a plywood fascia is a multiple-layer affair to accommodate the seams (typically two layers of 3/4" to give you 1-1/2"). Also, I agree it is never to be left exposed to ensure the edges do not see moisture. It will need an aluminum cover at minimum. Commercially, plywood is used ALOT in fascia work and I've never seen problems.

AGWhitehouse 08-08-2012 08:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 984118)
I'd first take a look at what's causing it. If it's just the rafter tails cut wrong it's a simple fix, the roof starting to sag then better get it fixed before it comes down, whole building settling then your out of luck.

This is great advice...

kwikfishron 08-08-2012 12:23 PM

:eek: Plywood Fascia???

AGWhitehouse 08-08-2012 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 984254)
:eek: Plywood Fascia???

Really? I'm as suprised as you are that you've never heard of one... Again, it's NOT left exposed...

mae-ling 08-08-2012 02:30 PM

I have never seen this. We almost always use 2x6, on some sheds 1x6

AGWhitehouse 08-08-2012 03:00 PM

It's mainly Commercial projects that get plywood and it's always a sub-fascia, but AZEK, KLEER, or any of those PVC products do require a rigid sub-strate which is where we usually specify it. Below is a soffit on a project I was recently a part of...

Gary in WA 08-08-2012 11:57 PM

AGW, why is the brick ventilation coupled to the soffit/roof framing to deposit moisture there, or am I missing something in your diagram? I understand brick back-ventilated cavities are to vent to the exterior; http://www.coastalcontractor.net/article/221.html

http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...r_cladding.pdf

Perhaps the framing is separated from the ventilation area by ? that is labeled but not apparent to me..... it just seems unusual to me. I'm certain there is a good reason, something not pictured or pictured and not labeled.

Gary

AGWhitehouse 08-09-2012 08:30 AM

GBR, my firm was only hired to draft that particular job. I don't know if this website's servers could hold the list of things I disagreed with on that job...

It's just the first detail I could think of that had a plywood sub-fascia...

Gary in WA 08-09-2012 09:49 AM

Thanks, and I agree, most H.O.'s wouldn't need/use a plywood fascia, only commercial....not very DIY friendly unless they own a brake.

Gary


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