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Old 11-19-2010, 03:28 PM   #1
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OSB or plywood?


This is a regular gable-type roofed house w/ a single carport located in Mississippi. I am enclosing my carport. I plan to use brick to complete the wall at the front of the house. I will use some type of siding for the side, as I am going to build a 2-car garage onto the end of the house later.

I have the walls studded up and want to install sheathing and Tyvek this weekend. What shout I use- OSB or plywood? How long can I leave the Tyvek- covered walls exposed to the elements? I read that DuPont recommended not over 120 days.

I have just about decided to use Hardipanel on the side wall. I am a bit confused about application though. On the gable side- there is only a door and no windows. My walls are 3-5/8, using 1 layer of 1/2 gyp on inside wall. If I use a regular size throat door shouldn't I install Hardypanel THEN install door trim? Can I use the ring-shank nails along w/ my airgun to install the panels?
It's the small details always that bites you in the butt!


Last edited by crewguy; 11-19-2010 at 04:04 PM.
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:43 PM   #2
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OSB or plywood?


Might try:
http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publication...d-and-plywood/
some of this relative to your question:
"Wall sheathing: No news is good news. All manufacturers of siding products I contacted agree that osb and plywood are equals. Kevin Chung, Engineer with Western Wood Products Association in Seattle assures us, “There have been no problems reported from the field. Nail-holding and racking resistance are the same.” Chung has noticed some concern about the use of osb among builders, but is quick to add, “There is no reason for any concern. Both products serve equally well as a nailbase.”
Roof sheathing is a mixed bag. The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) in Rosemont, IL and the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) in Rockville, MD both recommend the use of APA performance rated osb and plywood panels. However, ARMA, NRCA and representatives from at least 2 roofing manufacturers, Cellotex and TAMKO, prefer plywood roof decks. Warranties on shingles are extended to both substrates, but manufactures feel more comfortable with plywood. Mark Graham, NRCA’s associate director of technical services says, “We hear a lot of complaints related to dimensional stability. And a disproportionate number are related to osb. So we are a little bit cautious.” Grahm also acknowledges that APA, an organization he clearly respects, is standing firmly behind the osb product.
Florida’s Dade county is the only building code district in the country that prohibits the use of osb as a roof deck. Damage to roofs during hurricane Andrew were originally blamed on osb’s poor nail-holding power. Dade’s banning of osb spawned several research initiatives to explore the suitability of osb as a structural sheathing. Research conducted by APA, Chow, LaTona and others have conclusively proven osb seaworthy. Many experts think the ban makes no sense. Dade’s position is perceived by many industry insiders to be a political maneuver to satisfy public concern."


Last edited by bob22; 11-19-2010 at 06:45 PM.
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Old 11-19-2010, 10:11 PM   #3
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OSB or plywood?


The carport slab may not support the brick wall or the framed wall. Any wood (unless p.t.) needs to be 6" above the ground. The slab may need a plastic vapor barrier under it if the space is heated. You probably need a permit to change the use of the structure. You may come back here again asking how to fix a crack in the slab next time......

Gary
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Old 11-20-2010, 08:24 AM   #4
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
The carport slab may not support the brick wall or the framed wall. Any wood (unless p.t.) needs to be 6" above the ground. The slab may need a plastic vapor barrier under it if the space is heated. You probably need a permit to change the use of the structure. You may come back here again asking how to fix a crack in the slab next time......

Gary
I had concrete poured to the elevation of the house. A 12'x21' pad (5 1/2 ") took 4 1/2 yards of concrete. I assure you this slab isn't going to crack too soon. The contractor drilled holes into the existing carport floor and home-sides. He used rebar and crossed it every 2'. He also added fiber to the mix.
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Old 11-20-2010, 08:33 AM   #5
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
The carport slab may not support the brick wall or the framed wall. Any wood (unless p.t.) needs to be 6" above the ground. The slab may need a plastic vapor barrier under it if the space is heated. You probably need a permit to change the use of the structure. You may come back here again asking how to fix a crack in the slab next time......

Gary
I assume the BRICKS he speaks of is just a Cosmetic kind. Not meant to support the weight of the roof. The concrete should easily support this weight(concrete footer needs to be added if the roof was going to be changed to a heavier type of roof.) For the work you trying to do you county may require a permit, but no-one ever pulls one to do this type of work.
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Old 11-20-2010, 08:35 AM   #6
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by crewguy View Post

I have the walls studded up and want to install sheathing and Tyvek this weekend.
Did you put a row of block on top of the slab and frame the walls on top of that? Or, did you frame the walls on top of the slab? If so, that's no good because your framing/siding has to be at least 6" above grade.

Quote:
How long can I leave the Tyvek- covered walls exposed to the elements? I read that DuPont recommended not over 120 days.
You have your answer already.

Quote:
I have just about decided to use Hardipanel on the side wall. I am a bit confused about application though. On the gable side- there is only a door and no windows. My walls are 3-5/8, using 1 layer of 1/2 gyp on inside wall. If I use a regular size throat door shouldn't I install Hardypanel THEN install door trim?
No, your windows and doors get installed first.

Quote:
Can I use the ring-shank nails along w/ my airgun to install the panels?
It's the small details always that bites you in the butt!
You have to use what Hardi tells you to use. Go to their installation guide on their website and print it out and follow every single thing they tell you.
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Last edited by Joe Carola; 11-20-2010 at 08:59 AM.
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Old 11-20-2010, 08:56 AM   #7
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OSB or plywood?


I want to use OSB and HardiPanel.

Here's what I cannot figure out: 1/2 drywall + 7/16 OSB + Hardi Panel ( how thick is it?). A regular-size door throat is 4 5/8. How do you trim out this combination????
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:02 AM   #8
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by crewguy View Post
I want to use OSB and HardiPanel.

Here's what I cannot figure out: 1/2 drywall + 7/16 OSB + Hardi Panel ( how thick is it?). A regular-size door throat is 4 5/8. How do you trim out this combination????
Door jambs are 4-9/16". You never include the siding. Door goes in first. The door flange or brick molding gets nailed to the sheathing and the doorjamb will be flush with the inside of the sheetrock. Trim gets nailed on top of the door flange.

What are your answers to my post #6?
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:16 AM   #9
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OSB or plywood?


Joe- see my post about the concrete pad.
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:18 AM   #10
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Carola View Post
Door jambs are 4-9/16". You never include the siding. Door goes in first. The door flange or brick molding gets nailed to the sheathing and the doorjamb will be flush with the inside of the sheetrock. Trim gets nailed on top of the door flange.

What are your answers to my post #6?
install brick mould on OSB? So how do I run the Hardipanel?
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Old 11-20-2010, 11:18 AM   #11
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by crewguy View Post
Joe- see my post about the concrete pad.
12'x21' x 5-1/2". That means it's 5-1/2" above grade and the walls are sitting on top of that?
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Old 11-20-2010, 11:21 AM   #12
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OSB or plywood?


Quote:
Originally Posted by crewguy View Post
install brick mould on OSB? So how do I run the Hardipanel?
.Yes, you stick the door into the opening. The back of the brick mold casing on the door hits the osb and you nail through the face of the brickmold into the osb. Now the inside of the jamb will be flush with the sheetrock.

After that your siding butts into the side of the brick mold. This is how it is done on every single house and addition. You never install siding first and then the doors/windows on top of siding.
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Old 11-20-2010, 11:54 AM   #13
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OSB or plywood?


Many thanks!
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Old 11-20-2010, 12:43 PM   #14
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OSB or plywood?


"This is a regular gable-type roofed house w/ a single carport located in Mississippi. I am enclosing my carport. I plan to use brick to complete the wall at the front of the house." --------- The last 4-5 carport conversions I answered on forums had no thickened perimeter footings. Yours is the exception. Hence, I used "may" on the answers.... Another problem is anchoring the frame walls with "J" bolts required embedded in concrete, impossible to do on a slab for a carport or screened patio conversion.

Veneer bricks and frame walls weigh 48# per sq.ft. Picture an older carport poured 3" thick supporting brick veneer on the front wall only with no footings there. 8' tall walls with brick = 384# per lineal foot x 12' wide = 4608# on the front edge. This is why thickened footings are required, even for veneer walls of brick next to a structure.

"For the work you trying to do you county may require a permit, but no-one ever pulls one to do this type of work." ----- Building codes are for minimum safety standards, like getting a "D" on your test. Maybe true for your local area, I recommend getting one, anywhere. It's a paper trail for the house's improvements when you go to sell. Your Homeowners Insurance carrier will honor any claims in the future. You won't be liable if something "goes South" in the future. You may learn egress is required when a bedroom, gas appliances need their own air supply- now enclosed in a room, minimum light and ventilation, etc.

OSB is inferior to plywood IF it ever gets wet. It cannot handle the water from a leak: http://www.gp.com/build/PageViewer.a...elementid=6132

Drainable house wraps or an air gap will help protect OSB, and be sure to gap the joints, if you must use it: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...d%20in%20walls

Gary

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Last edited by Gary in WA; 11-20-2010 at 12:48 PM.
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