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Old 10-30-2008, 05:25 PM   #1
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Old window header construction


on older homes why did they take two 2x4's and lay them flat above a window for the header on a bearing wall?
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:01 PM   #2
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Old window header construction


They didn't know any better.
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:07 PM   #3
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Old window header construction


that many people didnt know any better?
I would like to give them more credit but I cant find any
Thanks for the affirmation.



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Old 10-31-2008, 06:31 AM   #4
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Old window header construction


A lot of those houses had 3/4 thick solid wood sheathing to tie the window headers and top plates together. That helped to bear the load (right or wrong). A good number of them were balloon construction too. Plenty of houses were built that way and never had sag issues over the windows. Many construction techniques evolved from from when houses were built of much more massive stock. The same techniques were carried over into the later era when we started building houses out of kindling wood. Just how construction has evolved.
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Old 10-31-2008, 11:45 AM   #5
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Old window header construction


They did it because they could.........and it was the accepted way at the time. As Maintenance6 pointed out, it was also a time when a 2"x4" WAS 2"x4" (at least) and stouter sheathing. Not to mention that the lumber itself was stronger! Not like today where it's planted, fertilized, grown for 15 (not 50) years, and harvested. Then it's milled, kiln dried and shipped out. Hence, you take the banding off a bundle of 2"x's and half of them warp before you can use them. It was a different era in building.
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Old 11-03-2008, 02:57 PM   #6
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Old window header construction


They didnt save any money by doing it that way.
I always remembered windows were never easy to open on old homes.
Aside from the fact that , they painted them shut. The construction
may have contributed to that.

I just always wondered why. Still nobody knows.

Thanks for the replys ... really no one can really imagine why.

Our wood quality got worse but we got smarter.
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