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Old 11-02-2012, 02:32 PM   #16
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


Given the cost difference between 2x8 vs 2x10....in the long run, I think you would happier with 2x10.

Something else to consider...the typical sub-floor is 3/4" T&G. My architect had me do 1 1/8" T&G for my 2-story addition (pics in the link in my signature). OMG (I hate that phrase but it applies here). Walking on the 2nd floor of my addition is about par to walking on a concrete slab. The sheets were maybe $15 more/sheet....but some of the best money I have spent.

So...upping the sub-floor can go a long ways to making it stiffer....especially important if you want to put down tile.

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Old 11-02-2012, 04:07 PM   #17
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBrackins
what will be the span of your joists? what is the species and grade of your lumber?
The total span is 16'.. But I was told to go by design span? Which was explained to me to be from the face of the supports . In which case the design span for each joist would be 6 1/2 '.. They are going to be spaced 16" on center . They are grade 2 SPF

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Old 11-02-2012, 04:54 PM   #18
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


With the 6 1/2' span, 2x8s would allow for ceramic or natural stone, according to the john bridge deflectolator.

But hell, if it were me, I would just use 2x10s. :D
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Old 11-02-2012, 06:06 PM   #19
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


i frame both additions for renos and custom new homes... the only time we use 2x8's is when we have to match the ceiling heights of the existing in the house.. and even then we try to get 7 1/4 " tji's or ojts as they can span longer distances and stay straighter tji's especially

as for 2x6... the only thing i would use those for in regards to a floor would be a landing for stairs and thats it.. by code a 2x6 is only good for walls its not even considered a floor joist by the canadian code
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Old 11-02-2012, 07:16 PM   #20
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthewandbrand View Post
The total span is 16'.. But I was told to go by design span? Which was explained to me to be from the face of the supports . In which case the design span for each joist would be 6 1/2 '.. They are going to be spaced 16" on center . They are grade 2 SPF

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SPF #2 at 16" o.c.
live load = 40 psf dead load = 10 psf
deflection = L/360
from Span tables of 2009 IRC

2x6 maximum span 9'-4"

2x8 maximum span 12'-3"

2x10 maximum span 15'-5"

2x12 maximum span 17'-10"

for 16' span I'd probably go with 2x10 at 12" o.c. which has a span of 17'-3", either that or reduce the span.

with a deflection of L/360 you could expect the following deflection = (16'x12" per ft)/360 = 0.53"

when you near the maximum span of joists they tend to get more bouncy.
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Old 11-02-2012, 09:54 PM   #21
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


I've spanned 12' with doug fir 2x6's, 12" o.c. with 2 sets of solid blocking (every 4'). 3/4" t&g osb sheathing, then 1/2 tilebacker and tile. No problems.

I think you can take the bounce out of a floor by loading it somewhat. For example, when a home is stocked with sheetrock, try walking around on the floor. It will feel very solid. Not because the floor is not deflecting with your movement, but because it is not bouncing back as usual because it would have to bounce the weight of all the sheetrock on the floor.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:01 AM   #22
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


thats not a good thing.. so your admitting the floor is sagging from the weight of the drywall
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:36 AM   #23
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


Of course the floor is sagging from the sheetrock. You are stocking the entire house in one room. Who knows how overloaded the floor is at that point. What I'm saying is that the floor doesn't bounce back up. It mimics more closely a room with a full dead and live weight load, plus some.
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Old 11-03-2012, 11:22 PM   #24
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


I would go two by ten. Under building a floor has always turned into a real bummer. Personally I would not want an type of glue board of any sort in my home for a variety of different reasons.
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:05 PM   #25
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Is it ok I use 2x6 wood for floor joist.


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Originally Posted by cleveman View Post
Not because the floor is not deflecting with your movement, but because it is not bouncing back as usual
If the floor deflects with someone moving on it, but it doesn't bounce back,
wouldn't that mean the floor will continue to deflect further each time someone walks on it, until it collapses?

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