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Old 06-30-2007, 03:38 PM   #16
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Double seam (10'-0" walls) - Before Sanding:



Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 06-30-2007 at 03:48 PM.
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Old 06-30-2007, 07:14 PM   #17
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What is a double seam?
And previous post, they mention "float."
What is a float.
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Old 06-30-2007, 07:45 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
What is a double seam?
And previous post, they mention "float."
What is a float.
YM,

A double seam refers to two horizontal seams close to eachother (as opposed to a single seam). Those two seams must be coated extra wide, but must also be coated SMOOTH. This is not an easy task for a DIYer or even for a pro person that has been doing drywall for a year or two...

That picture was a garage with 10' high ceilings. We only had 8' long sheetrock onsite (not 10'), so we laid them down horizontally (rather than standing them up and only having vertical seams floor to ceiling)
This resulted in a "strip" of sheetrock 2 feet wide placed in the middle of the two horizontally laid sheets. 4' + 2' + 4' = 10'

Floating: Is a term used in some parts of the US which refers to "Coating" drywall with compound.
Don't ask me why....

We just call it "taping and coating" in my neck of the woods...
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Old 06-30-2007, 09:59 PM   #19
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Thanks Atlantic.
Why are they done coated as one? Is that to avoid a dip in the middle?
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Old 07-01-2007, 07:55 AM   #20
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Thanks Atlantic.
Why are they done coated as one? Is that to avoid a dip in the middle?
Exactly. It hides the seams much better.

Again, it's one of those points that separates the expert "tapers" (Floaters)from the "good" tapers.
An expert taper can "put lipstick on a Pig" ..... so to speak. As stated earlier, an expert taper can coat to the point that it almost appears as if the area finished has already been sanded. So, very little sanding is required to finish the job.
The coated seams are smooth and consistent. An expert taper is able to actually "Skim-coat" entire areas, if need be, to hide things....

We have one taper that has been taping full time for over 10 years. He takes alot of pride in his work. But there are some areas that he just can't get as smooth as what I would consider an expert could accomplish.

Example: From time to time, My business partner or I, has to step in and do taping (floating) and sanding (when we get very busy). My Biz. partner has had to sand the 10-year guy's work, and the 20+year guy's work....and compare the difference.

The 20+ year guys work: Already smooth, barely any sanding needed....
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Old 07-01-2007, 11:25 AM   #21
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I have not done it yet, but I imagine a lot of this has to do with getting the mud to a perfect consistency?
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Old 07-01-2007, 04:45 PM   #22
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I have not done it yet, but I imagine a lot of this has to do with getting the mud to a perfect consistency?
Yes, premixed mud usually comes out of the bucket just right for average homeowner. If you get the bag mix, it will dry faster but you have to add just the right amount of water and mix it up good to get the right consistency.
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Old 07-03-2007, 07:30 AM   #23
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Yes, premixed mud usually comes out of the bucket just right for average homeowner. If you get the bag mix, it will dry faster but you have to add just the right amount of water and mix it up good to get the right consistency.

And YM, if its your first (few) Time(s), I don't recommend you do get the bag mix. I would go for the premixed stuff. The mixable stuff can be kinda intimidating, its dry time varies from fast to really fast so there isn't much time to learn the process as you go. The extra workable time of the premixed stuff would be much appreciated. I always like to dip my knife in water every so often regardless of what type of compound I'm using, to keep the mixture smooth and workable.
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:54 AM   #24
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This guy has some good vids on his site.

http://www.drywallschool.com/protips.htm
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Old 07-20-2007, 02:39 PM   #25
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How come nobody mentioned that he hung the rock wrong? Most guys I know avoid horizontal joints and prefer to put all joints over a stud except where it can't be avoided.
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Old 07-21-2007, 06:33 AM   #26
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How come nobody mentioned that he hung the rock wrong? Most guys I know avoid horizontal joints and prefer to put all joints over a stud except where it can't be avoided.
There's diffferent ways to install sheetrock. It all depends on the framing, room size, room heights, etc.

For example: In alot of "standard homes", the walls are approximately 7'-8" to 7'-10". It is best to have a single "factory" seam placed horizontally. That seam is now also waste height and easy to coat.
Other example:
Steel framed commercial walls: 8'-0" to 10'-0" wall heights with "dropped ceilings". Best to stand the sheets up and have all factory seams placed vertically over the studs.

.....

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-21-2007 at 08:46 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-21-2007, 07:01 AM   #27
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In a "standard home", the walls are approximately 7'-8" to 7'-9". .....
I've never done residential construction where there was not room to stand an 8' sheet of drywall on end and still have it at least 1/2 inch off the floor. 92 5/8" precut studs, plus the bottom plate and double top plate = 97 1/8". Ceiling drywall goes up first leaviing 96 5/8", which is perfect for hanging an 8' sheet of drywall and leaving it the recommended 1/2"+ off the floor. I wouldn't build a room with ceilings any lower, and if you do, why? The additional work involved in cutting all the studs and the drywall would only increase cost. Furthermore, even if you did only have a 7'-8" ceiling, it makes a whole lot more sense to cut the end off of a sheet of drywall than to have to cut 2" off the edge and then tape butt joints.

rww

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Old 07-21-2007, 04:35 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwwood View Post
I've never done residential construction where there was not room to stand an 8' sheet of drywall on end and still have it at least 1/2 inch off the floor. 92 5/8" precut studs, plus the bottom plate and double top plate = 97 1/8". Ceiling drywall goes up first leaviing 96 5/8", which is perfect for hanging an 8' sheet of drywall and leaving it the recommended 1/2"+ off the floor. I wouldn't build a room with ceilings any lower, and if you do, why? The additional work involved in cutting all the studs and the drywall would only increase cost. Furthermore, even if you did only have a 7'-8" ceiling, it makes a whole lot more sense to cut the end off of a sheet of drywall than to have to cut 2" off the edge and then tape butt joints.

rww
We have been doing our own drywall on our projects and also run a drywall, plaster & painting division (commercial, residential, industrial) - since 1984. We did hundreds upon hundreds of houses and condos in the 80's boom. Alot of the ceilings were under 8'-0".
Residential homes to this day are still all hung (with 12' sheetrock) horizontally.

We have current multiple drywall contracts, one contract is to do 11 homes, each with over 300 sheets of 12' sheetrock. I have 3 sets of home plans in front of me right now as I am writing this response. Ceilings: Final measurements are all under 8'-0" except for a trayed ceiling in the Master bedrooms and open foyers.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-21-2007 at 06:41 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-21-2007, 05:27 PM   #29
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Who're the builder, contractor, and or architect? Where I've lived and been involved in construction (all phases and types of residential construction), I've never run into that. I've been in some homes that were built as military housing that had less than 8 foot ceilings, and to be quite truthful felt the room was closing in on me, and I'm not that tall. So, I'm surprised that a builder would be doing less than 8' ceiled rooms. It surprises me even more, knowing that there is more work and expense involved in not using standard and readily available material sizes.

I guess the old saying that "Ya learn somethin' new every day" is fitting.
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Old 07-21-2007, 09:22 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
We have been doing our own drywall on our projects and also run a drywall, plaster & painting division (commercial, residential, industrial) - since 1984. We did hundreds upon hundreds of houses and condos in the 80's boom. Alot of the ceilings were under 8'-0".
Residential homes to this day are still all hung (with 12' sheetrock) horizontally.

We have current multiple drywall contracts, one contract is to do 11 homes, each with over 300 sheets of 12' sheetrock. I have 3 sets of home plans in front of me right now as I am writing this response. Ceilings: Final measurements are all under 8'-0" except for a trayed ceiling in the Master bedrooms and open foyers.
Wow, you are really busy.
....and must be rich too.

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