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Old 12-07-2009, 11:12 AM   #46
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


Did you use pressure treated wood where it comes in contact with the concrete? It wouldn't pass code here if you didn't.

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Old 12-07-2009, 11:28 AM   #47
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


Before you insulate and after wiring: Install fire-stopping between vertical and horizontal duct soffits; add foam board at concrete stem walls; remove existing plastic v.b. and install new v.b. over stud walls. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...gs?full_view=1
http://oikos.com/library/insulating_...lls/index.html

http://www.codecheck.com/cc/images/CC5thEdSample.pdf Page#4.

From KC (new daddy!): How to fireblock framing Framing looks good!

Be safe, Gary
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Old 12-07-2009, 03:41 PM   #48
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


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Originally Posted by silvergs View Post
In other words - drywall the ducts and walls and finally install the drop ceiling?
Yes if you install all of those rails first you have to notch the drywall for every rail. Run your drywall higher then the ceiling will be and it will save you alot of finish work.
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Old 12-07-2009, 03:43 PM   #49
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


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I hope that's pressure treated lumber on wall sole/bottom plates, it doesn't look like it from the pics.
Agree not only is it a code violation you are just aking for trouble.
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Old 12-07-2009, 09:07 PM   #50
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If you are not getting a permit, at least slip some 6mil plastic or this under the bottom plates: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...248&lpage=none
Mold and rot can be nasty!

You need an outside air supply to the furnace or your family's health could suffer: �� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building when the building is of unusually tight construction.
(M1701.1.1) (Typically homes built after 1986)
1. Minimum of 100 sq.in. per opening of combustion air is required.
2. One opening in upper 12” and one opening in lower 12” of room.

We are only trying to help keep everyone safe, just a building codes are the minimum safety requirements.

Be safe, Gary
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:22 AM   #51
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Before you insulate and after wiring: Install fire-stopping between vertical and horizontal duct soffits; add foam board at concrete stem walls; remove existing plastic v.b. and install new v.b. over stud walls. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...gs?full_view=1
http://oikos.com/library/insulating_...lls/index.html

http://www.codecheck.com/cc/images/CC5thEdSample.pdf Page#4.

From KC (new daddy!): How to fireblock framing Framing looks good!

Be safe, Gary
Thanks GBR!
Quote:
Originally Posted by voiles View Post
Agree not only is it a code violation you are just aking for trouble.
The wood is pressure treated lumber. Studs, bottom and top plates.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
If you are not getting a permit, at least slip some 6mil plastic or this under the bottom plates: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...248&lpage=none
Mold and rot can be nasty!
How do you install that plastic after you have installed the plate on the floor?

Quote:
You need an outside air supply to the furnace or your family's health could suffer: �� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building when the building is of unusually tight construction.
(M1701.1.1) (Typically homes built after 1986)
1. Minimum of 100 sq.in. per opening of combustion air is required.
2. One opening in upper 12 and one opening in lower 12 of room.

We are only trying to help keep everyone safe, just a building codes are the minimum safety requirements.

Be safe, Gary
Outside air supply? The house was already built. I didn't build this house from scratch. Are you saying that the builder didn't install an outside air supply? I am confused now..........
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:26 AM   #52
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


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Thanks GBR!
The wood is pressure treated lumber. Studs, bottom and top plates.


How do you install that plastic after you have installed the plate on the floor?

Silver, are you sure that's all pt wood, it sure doesn't look like it. Any why use pt for studs and top plates, it's much more expensive than non-pt?

I'm not bustin' your chops, but that sure doesn't look like pt to me.
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Old 12-08-2009, 02:33 PM   #53
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Silver you must be confused there is no way that is PT wood. The only I see of fixing this is taking a saws all and cutting the plats out and putting new PT ones in. This is just for walls so doesn't look like you risk much structural damage doing it. You can put some braces in to hold the top plates.
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Old 12-08-2009, 03:04 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
remove existing plastic v.b. and install new v.b. over stud walls.
YES. Do not leave that plastic up, then put more insulation in front of it. You must only have one vapor barrier, fully on the inside of all the insulation, directly under the drywall. Even if you think, "well I won't put up another vapor barrier after the new insulation", thats not good either. The paint on the drywall will act as a vapor barrier and now you have 2 vb in your wall.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:34 PM   #55
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Silver you must be confused there is no way that is PT wood. The only I see of fixing this is taking a saws all and cutting the plats out and putting new PT ones in. This is just for walls so doesn't look like you risk much structural damage doing it. You can put some braces in to hold the top plates.
What does PT wood look like since you guys have me convinced to tear up my hard work?

Are you guys saying Pressure Treated lumber or Treated lumber. Clearly, by the comments regarding what you see, it must be very obvious just by the "look", so my curiosity has gotten the better of me.

I googled pressure treated lumber and I don't see the difference, even though when I bought the wood at the local Home Depot store I specifically asked for 2x4's to finish my basement. Clearly I was mis-led by the general consensus of opinion on here.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:35 PM   #56
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YES. Do not leave that plastic up, then put more insulation in front of it. You must only have one vapor barrier, fully on the inside of all the insulation, directly under the drywall. Even if you think, "well I won't put up another vapor barrier after the new insulation", thats not good either. The paint on the drywall will act as a vapor barrier and now you have 2 vb in your wall.
Thanks! Point taken!
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:04 PM   #57
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


Pressure treated lumber is darker in color, usually a slight greenish tint. It usually has a higher moisture content as well due to the treatment.

Any time you have wood coming in direct contact with concrete, you want to be using pt lumber as it's treated to be moisture/rot resistant.

If your basement building book doesn't mention this, then you may want to toss it, as it is a pretty important first step.
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:09 PM   #58
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Here's a pic, but it can be lighter/darker, but you know it when you see it, once you've used it.

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Old 12-08-2009, 06:17 PM   #59
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Pressure treated lumber is darker in color, usually a slight greenish tint. It usually has a higher moisture content as well due to the treatment.

Any time you have wood coming in direct contact with concrete, you want to be using pt lumber as it's treated to be moisture/rot resistant.

If your basement building book doesn't mention this, then you may want to toss it, as it is a pretty important first step.
I specifically asking for treated lumber as recommende by the book for the floor and the guy at the home depot store said it's no needed and I just need to wrap those pieces of lumber in a thick black plastic sheet. I forgot to do that till I was more than half way through the job.

Short of undoing my work what other recourse do I have to rectify this?
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:30 PM   #60
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Not really a handy person, but my motivation will make up for it! Some tips?


I don't have any help for you there, never run across the situation, maybe others have.

Good luck, I know it sucks after all the work has been done, to find this out.

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