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-   -   Not loving the basement pole (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/not-loving-basement-pole-57034/)

Dave Clee 11-11-2009 10:11 PM

Not loving the basement pole
 
Well I've searched on this forum and have found a few threads that helped but I wanted to throw this out there. I am looking to put a pool table in the basement. There is one....only one but very annoying pole
in the way.
I have attached a photo. Question is can I remove or even relocate the pole as per the photo ?? Even 2 feet closer to the wall would help.

Any advice would be appreciated..Great forum btw :)

Cheers

Dave

http://www.daveclee.com/Other/DSC-St...6_2K2hC-XL.jpg

Scuba_Dave 11-11-2009 10:26 PM

You'd need an engineer to calc the load to determine if you can move the pole
You can't guess on this

oh'mike 11-11-2009 10:30 PM

In a word--NO

As you know any thing can be done if you have enough money.

If you want to give it a go -this is how it's done--

In order to move the pole -first you must temporarily support the house with cribbing and two temporary beams(one on either side of the existing beam.

Next -remove old beam and post(s) Dispose of old beam,

Buy and install new heavier beam ,sized for the longer span.

open concrete floor-dig and pour new concrete footings..

Relocate column.

Remove two temporary beams and cribbing.

Rebuild ceilings,walls and floor-paint -tile --now you're ready to set up the pool table!!!! Easy,take a crew of four less than two weeks>maybe--

Dave Clee 11-11-2009 10:34 PM

Thanks for the replies....Much appreciated...Curious but any idea of the cost of new I Beam ?? I would have no clue...lol...

I realise there is a huge labour cost...But curious as to the cost of the beam.

Cheers

Dave

Ron6519 11-11-2009 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Clee (Post 351994)
Thanks for the replies....Much appreciated...Curious but any idea of the cost of new I Beam ?? I would have no clue...lol...

I realise there is a huge labour cost...But curious as to the cost of the beam.

Cheers

Dave

You would first hire an engineer to tell you what size beam you would need. It's cost would be only a small part of the entire cost of the job. Out of curiosity, you could go down to the local iron works and get prices for all the sizes available for your length.
Ron

oh'mike 11-11-2009 10:58 PM

It's been a long time since I bought or hung any steel. With google you can likely find an answer.

I hope you realize I was just joking around,If the day ever comes that you can design and build you own house the cost of long spans is one design feature I'll bet you will spring for.--MIKE--

Dave Clee 11-11-2009 11:06 PM

There is no doubt that if I do ever design my own house, there wont be a pole in sight...

So I'll be honest and thought your reply was legit. I am by no means a reno king which is why I posed the question. I figured the 2 weeks of work was way off. But hey I'll admit this isnt my thing..

Really what I am looking for is this sort of mod gonna cost me $1000 or $10000. If its $10k then obviously I would spend my $$ elsewhere. If its
under $3k then I would think about it..

Cheers

Dave

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 352006)
It's been a long time since I bought or hung any steel. With google you can likely find an answer.

I hope you realize I was just joking around,If the day ever comes that you can design and build you own house the cost of long spans is one design feature I'll bet you will spring for.--MIKE--


Scuba_Dave 11-11-2009 11:20 PM

What's above the beam ?
One floor, 2 ? Roof loads ?
Prices vary widely by area & by the person doing the work
There is no way anyone can give you anything close to a correct estimate
It could be between $3-10k
Getting the beam in there is usually one problem
In some case the entire house is lifted up to put a new beam in
Or a hole cut in a wall

I needed (3) 16" LVL's to support 2 floors & roof loads - 22' span
And that is with a post in the middle
17' isn't as bad....but still a long span

If you want a correct estimate call a couple local people to come out & look & figure it out

Dave Clee 11-11-2009 11:26 PM

main floor above, then a supporting wall that goes up to 2nd floor veranda by stair case..
I'll be getting in touch with someone tomorrow to setup a time to have a look.

Thanks for the reply.

Dave

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 352015)
What's above the beam ?
One floor, 2 ? Roof loads ?
Prices vary widely by area & by the person doing the work
There is no way anyone can give you anything close to a correct estimate
It could be between $3-10k
Getting the beam in there is usually one problem
In some case the entire house is lifted up to put a new beam in
Or a hole cut in a wall

I needed (3) 16" LVL's to support 2 floors & roof loads - 22' span
And that is with a post in the middle
17' isn't as bad....but still a long span

If you want a correct estimate call a couple local people to come out & look & figure it out


Daniel Holzman 11-12-2009 12:08 AM

Before you go too far, you really should find out exactly what the size and type of the existing beam is. There is always the chance that the beam was sized for 17 foot span, not the 13 foot span. Of course, if it were sized for 17 feet, it would be unusual to have put a post in at 13 feet, but the only way to know is to open the beam covering and see exactly what you have.

It is also possible that the existing beam could be made larger by adding to the side of the beam, I did a project like that in a house where the main wood beam had sustained water damage. We added a pair of 2x12 LVL beams to the outside of the existing beam (one on each side), bolted through, and were able to do it without removing the existing beam or even jacking the beam up. A clever contractor can do some pretty good work, but as noted, the sizing of the beam is typically done by an engineer.

Dave Clee 11-12-2009 12:23 AM

Hey Daniel, thanks ever so much for the detailed reply. I went over to the neighbors house, same as mine and figured out why that pole is there. Directly above that ibeam where the support pole is, is another i beam sitting on top of it running right angle to the front of the house. That i beam is directly below my first floor dining room wall which also supports the load of the 2nd floor hallway.
I guess they put that pole directly under where the 2 beams intersect.

I guess its time to get an engineer in to have a look at my options..

Thanks again.

Dave

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 352020)
Before you go too far, you really should find out exactly what the size and type of the existing beam is. There is always the chance that the beam was sized for 17 foot span, not the 13 foot span. Of course, if it were sized for 17 feet, it would be unusual to have put a post in at 13 feet, but the only way to know is to open the beam covering and see exactly what you have.

It is also possible that the existing beam could be made larger by adding to the side of the beam, I did a project like that in a house where the main wood beam had sustained water damage. We added a pair of 2x12 LVL beams to the outside of the existing beam (one on each side), bolted through, and were able to do it without removing the existing beam or even jacking the beam up. A clever contractor can do some pretty good work, but as noted, the sizing of the beam is typically done by an engineer.


joan518 11-12-2009 03:28 AM

Why not leave it alone and turn the pool table the other way?

Timberratt 11-12-2009 05:44 AM

I'm gonna take a stab at this one! That beam, because it is offset from center, my guess is that's picking up a point load, as somebody already said talk to an engineer. Dead loads and live loads are tricky enough, point loads are tough to play with in basements where head heights are always a concern, if that is what it is.

Joe F 11-12-2009 09:17 AM

I recently moved a support column in my basement. My case involved moving it about 4 ft so it could be hidden in a wall. I had an engineer come in
(~$300 bucks) and do all the calculations and tell me what I needed to do to support the new column. It was money very well spent, he even told me where to go to buy the column. He specified a sched 40 column which you can't usually find at the big home stores.

tpolk 11-12-2009 10:07 AM

I installed tables for awhile you need 5' around perimeter for que length or short sticks. have installed many a table with your problem and our motto is everyone has the same disadvantage. altho not perfect tou are losing only a small corner


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