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Old 12-05-2006, 09:43 AM   #1
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This is not a load-bearing wall, right?


I am 90% sure a wall I want to take down is not load bearing but want to make sure with you guys to get the other 10%! The wall is 9 feet long (currently has an archway opening in the middle) and seperates my front foyer from my living room (this is a 2-story 1930 house). The wall is parrell with the 1st floor joists (perpendicular to the main carrying beam) and the wall actually just sits on the 1st floor subfloor. The wall sits on the 3/4 inch subfloor and is actually placed in-between two joists (there is no joist directly under the wall).

I can't see how the joists are positioned on the 2nd floor in the spot that the wall would be underneath but in another section of the house the 2nd floor joists are in the same location as the 1st floors (parrell to this particular wall)-so i would assume the 2nd floor joists are parrell to the wall as well. No wall exists above this wall on the 2nd floor (it is just the middle of a bedroom).

Everything I have read says this is not a load bearing wall. What do you experts and DIYers think? If it is not load bearing I can just knock down the entire wall and just re-plaster the cieling and walls to get a smooth, nice transition right? I don't have to worry about any headers or anything? Thanks for the help.

Nick

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Old 12-06-2006, 06:10 AM   #2
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This is not a load-bearing wall, right?


You are assuming a few things there. I would make sure that the ceiling beams are running the same way as the wall first.

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Old 12-06-2006, 03:35 PM   #3
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This is not a load-bearing wall, right?


Sounds good from here but it's not gonna fall on MY head either way. Make sure first.
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Old 01-07-2007, 03:05 PM   #4
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This is not a load-bearing wall, right?


One thing I did notice after i took off the base molding was that the 2x4s are doubled up in the wall on the sides of the opening of the arch. I thought this was only done on load bearing walls to help distribute the weight of the header, is this common practice for non-load bearing walls too?

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Old 01-07-2007, 03:49 PM   #5
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This is not a load-bearing wall, right?


Yes it is common because there is still a header installed...even if it is just a couple of 2x4s
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