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GottaFixIt 01-09-2012 10:04 PM

Non Load Bearing Header
 
I need to construct a header for a 106" opening on a non load bearing partition wall.

The wall will be supporting a Johnson Hardware Multi-Pass (Tri-Pass) Door Track with (3) 36" x 80" doors with glass.

It will be a 3-Ply header of dimensional lumber to accommodate the track.

Currently, I'm leaning towards (3) - 2 x 8's glued and screwed.

What would you use?

mae-ling 01-09-2012 11:39 PM

I would not use a header at all. Put cripple studs every 2' (or 16" if you like)

BigJim 01-10-2012 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GottaFixIt (Post 817995)
I need to construct a header for a 106" opening on a non load bearing partition wall.

The wall will be supporting a Johnson Hardware Multi-Pass (Tri-Pass) Door Track with (3) 36" x 80" doors with glass.

It will be a 3-Ply header of dimensional lumber to accommodate the track.

Currently, I'm leaning towards (3) - 2 x 8's glued and screwed.

What would you use?

If your wall is thicker than 2X4s I would do just like you suggested.

titanoman 01-10-2012 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mae-ling
I would not use a header at all. Put cripple studs every 2' (or 16" if you like)

That makes for a pretty flimsy wall.
And you can go to carpenter hell for putting anything 2' o/c.

The dbl 2x8 is overkill though. You could build a strong-back header (2 2x4's nailed in an "L" shape) and then notch the 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 out of the cripples.
The wall won't have any bounce or sag to it.

Edit: Nix that.
I guess you have a 4 1/2" wall.

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Maintenance 6 01-10-2012 07:20 AM

If it's a 2x4 wall, I'd use two 2x6s with a piece of 1/2" plywood glued and screwed between them. That should be more than sufficient to carry the doors. Make sure the header ends are sitting on jack studs.

Big Stud 01-10-2012 07:38 AM

I have to agree that 2x8s are overkill. 2x6 would be plenty strong.

My question is, do you not have to drywall the header after putting it in? Or should we assume that the framing is 4 1/2" and with 1/2" drywall will be 5 1/2"?

If it is a standard 2x4 wall, the framing is going to be 3 1/2". Usually you would use 2- 2x6 or 2x whatever with a piece of 1/2" plywood in between.

BTW ....... the other answers about just using a 2x4 on the flat with cripples would likely work as well in a non load bearing wall and be more cost effective. It just depends on what you want to spend,

BigJim 01-10-2012 09:52 AM

I do agree 3 2X8s are an over kill but if that is what he wants to do that is fine with me, it will for sure make a strong wall.

GottaFixIt 01-10-2012 10:03 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is the installation directions.

It requires a 5 1/4" header. The 3 Two-Bys would give me 4 1/2. I could space or shim these out to 5 1/4" - probably with a couple of sheets of 3/8 ply.

Or I could lay a 6x flat underneath and just deal with the extra 1/8" spacing from the trim.

I guess another option may be to construct a structural box beam.

Ugh... So many choices....

I just want to make sure that this 9' span doesn't bow down over the years...

Still open for suggestions.

GottaFixIt 01-10-2012 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Stud (Post 818228)
BTW ....... the other answers about just using a 2x4 on the flat with cripples would likely work as well in a non load bearing wall and be more cost effective. It just depends on what you want to spend,

I thought long and hard about just using a flat 2 x 6.

There are a couple of things that bother me about that.

IRC 2006 and 2009, Section R602.7.2
Nonbearing walls. Load-bearing headers are not required in interior or exterior nonbearing walls. A single, flat 2-inch-by-4-inch (51 mm by 102 mm) member may be used as a header in interior or exterior nonbearing walls for openings up to 8 feet (2438 mm) in width if the vertical distance to the parallel nailing surface above is not more than 24 inches (610 mm). For such nonbearing headers, no cripples or blocking is required above the header.


I'm over 8' width. In addition, this is in a lean-to roof above this. It doesn't have a vertical parallel nailer above it.

sixeightten 01-10-2012 12:28 PM

Go with the box beam or the triple 2x8. I think the glue and screws are unnecessary, but it sure can't hurt. The door itself will be hang from the header and that alone can cause sag over time.

mae-ling 01-10-2012 12:35 PM

"That makes for a pretty flimsy wall.
And you can go to carpenter hell for putting anything 2' o/c."

Mis-information here.

This is a non loadbearing wall. Header is not required. And 2foot on center studs are allowed.

Many assume a header above any door, why ? There really is no load.
Even for these doors which hang from the top. If you have a plate above the doors, cripple studs up to a top plate which is nailed to the bottom of the rafters nothing can really go anywhere. Unless these are heavy doors.

Putting in a header is not wrong, just not needed.

titanoman 01-10-2012 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sixeightten
Go with the box beam or the triple 2x8. I think the glue and screws are unnecessary, but it sure can't hurt. The door itself will be hang from the header and that alone can cause sag over time.

Also if you have the room double up the trimmers just because it's over 6'.

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titanoman 01-10-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mae-ling
"That makes for a pretty flimsy wall.
And you can go to carpenter hell for putting anything 2' o/c."

Mis-information here.

This is a non loadbearing wall. Header is not required. And 2foot on center studs are allowed.

Many assume a header above any door, why ? There really is no load.
Even for these doors which hang from the top. If you have a plate above the doors, cripple studs up to a top plate which is nailed to the bottom of the rafters nothing can really go anywhere. Unless these are heavy doors.

Putting in a header is not wrong,

just not needed.

There is no mis-information here.
And you are a lousy carpenter if you frame 2' o/c.

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mae-ling 01-10-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GottaFixIt (Post 818420)
I thought long and hard about just using a flat 2 x 6.

There are a couple of things that bother me about that.

IRC 2006 and 2009, Section R602.7.2
Nonbearing walls. Load-bearing headers are not required in interior or exterior nonbearing walls. A single, flat 2-inch-by-4-inch (51 mm by 102 mm) member may be used as a header in interior or exterior nonbearing walls for openings up to 8 feet (2438 mm) in width if the vertical distance to the parallel nailing surface above is not more than 24 inches (610 mm). For such nonbearing headers, no cripples or blocking is required above the header.


I'm over 8' width. In addition, this is in a lean-to roof above this. It doesn't have a vertical parallel nailer above it.

There is no top plate to this wall?
The way I read that is a 2x4 works on the flat up to 8' without cripples, more than 8' needs cripples.

Anything you put in for a header will work go double 2x6 with plywood inbetween or triple or double or triple 2x8, nail it or glue and screw

titanoman 01-10-2012 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mae-ling

There is no top plate to this wall?
The way I read that is a 2x4 works on the flat up to 8' without cripples, more than 8' needs cripples.

Anything you put in for a header will work go double 2x6 with plywood inbetween or triple or double or triple 2x8, nail it or glue and screw

That's what I said in my first post (because of the width, use something on edge). Dbl 2x6 is fine.
Cripples 16" o/c above it.

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