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Old 01-09-2008, 07:33 PM   #1
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NorthEast corner of Tennessee
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I am going to build a woodworking shop within my barn. The barn is presently used for lumber drying and storage. I have a shed hallway that is 16'x40' that will be the shop area. My plans call for a concrete slab, 3 runs of cinder blocks, the ends will have a garage door and window on one end with large windows and a 6' door on the other. The walls will have treated sill plates anchored to the block. The walls will be constructed with 2x6's on 16" centers; the outer walls will be covered with 5/8" osb. The ends will have vinyl over the osb. The walls will be insulated with R19 insulation. The interior walls will be covered with osb and sprayed white. The ceiling joist will be 2x10's on 16" centers and will be covered inside and out with osb, and insulated with R19. I plan to run a dust collector line under the slab with an electrical line in the center of the slab. What do you builders think is the best floor to use in this application. I have enough overhead room to install a wood floor (comfort issue) that would serve for room to run electrical and collector lines. Your thoughts please...

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Old 01-09-2008, 08:19 PM   #2
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Why run your dust collector line under the slab? You won't have access to it if it jams up, or if you need to change duct size to fine tune the flow. Also you'll be stuck with the outlet locations that you chose when pouring. I'd definitely run your collection ducts overhead. Most machinery accomodates overhead ducts better anyways. Other than a jointer and a tablesaw, I think it's easier to have the ductwork coming from above for all other machines.

I prefer a wood floor in a shop to reduce fatigue, and save handtools that are dropped. Drop a bench plane, and it's probably cracked if it hits a concrete slab. No problem if it hits a plywood floor.

If you have big machinery, then I'd leave about half the shop bare slab, or maybe just plywood directly on slab, because otherwise really heavy machinery doesn't sit well on a raised floor. For the bench-room section of the shop I'd lay down 2x3s on 16" centers, and cover with 3/4" ply or underlayment.

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