DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   New siding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/new-siding-731/)

sasha 06-21-2005 12:39 PM

New siding
 
I am residing an old house (1920) with wood. What is a better option : 1/2 inch plywood, then tar paper (taped), then siding - or tar paper, then 1/2 inch foam board, then shims, then siding? I am planning to place new screws in sheathing boards (old one had rusted) and caulk the gaps between them. Which option will prevent wood boards from twisting?

CarpenterDon 06-28-2005 02:32 AM

Quote:

Sasha wrote:
I am residing an old house (1920) with wood. What is a better option : 1/2 inch plywood, then tar paper (taped), then siding - or tar paper, then 1/2 inch foam board, then shims, then siding? I am planning to place new screws in sheathing boards (old one had rusted) and caulk the gaps between them. Which option will prevent wood boards from twisting?


Sasha,

What type of siding did or does the house have originally, clapboard or cedar shingles? It sounds like cedar shingles with skip sheathing under them, which is as it should be.

If the siding is still on the house, you need to make a story pole. What is a story pole? A story pole makes it easier to set your courses and it will keep them straight as you go up the house with the siding.

This is how you make a story pole:

1. You take a 2x2 that runs from the top of the siding to the bottom of the siding.
2. At one corner of the house place the 2x2 at the corner. Lay it against the wall, making sure to hold it tight where the last board meets the overhang (eave.)
3. Take a pencil and make the bottom of each course on the story pole.
4. Double check these marks at the opposite ends of the walls.

If there is a difference between these 2 points you want to split the difference, i.e; if the left side is a 1/4" higher then the right (or vice versa) split it by an 1/8", etc.

You do not want to caulk between the sheathing boards though. Those gaps are there to allow the wood siding to breathe from the back side. There will be condensation that builds up on the back side of the shingles or claps, having the gaps between the sheathing allows for air circulation on the back side, thus drying the condensation that gathers on the back.

"The majority of my business is renovating & restoring late 18th & 19th century homes."

Here is how I do it when replacing clap or shingle siding.

1. Repair and/or replace sheathing boards.
2. Starting from the bottom apply red rosin paper or Tyvek house wrap (rosin paper is the more economical approach & works just as well as house wrap.)
3. Overlap the rosin paper by 5" (working your way to the top.)
4. Take your story pole and transfer the mark on it to the walls.
5. Run a chalk line from the mark on the left to the corresponding mark on the right side and snap a line (this assures your siding will run in a straight line.
6. Continue on up the wall until your done.

The trick part is braiding the outside corners....Huh? It's a lot of work to do and it has to be done for the siding to look and lay properly, unless your house has corner boards already installed?!

Good luck!


richie 07-30-2005 09:27 PM

HI,
I also have a question about siding and insulation. I was planning to replace a section of siding, plan was to replace pywood, put on building paper, then nail on siding. However, my cousin is re-siding and has replaced insulation, then cover it with the black paper and duct tape, then plywood, then siding. Which is the correct, or best way to do it?

Confused.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:11 AM.