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-   -   New to renovations (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/new-renovations-147966/)

bemgolf 06-23-2012 01:19 AM

New to renovations
 
I am going to be renovating my currect house. I have done most of the work and enjoy doing so. I am needing to get a two car garage added on to the back of the house.

All I really want is for a contractor to connect this to the existing house and put a roof over it, and poor the concrete for the garage. The rest I am wanting to build myself. Is the correct term for this "rough in"?

Also I watch Homes on Holmes and have seen some of the mistakes that are made thoughtout the hiring process of contractors. So to aviod this in the future renovation can you give me a list of question that must be asked. I know this project it not much but I really want to make a good decision with my hire.

Thanks

JulieMor 06-23-2012 01:44 PM

The rough stage of any work can be considered anything to bare stud walls.

I wouldn't put a lot of importance into what Holmes does on his show. This, like most TV, is for entertainment purposes and while you can get some basic ideas from home DIY shows, they should not be your bible.

One of the best ways to find a decent contractor is to talk to people who have had work done at their house. If they like the work, ask them to show you why.

If you want to find a decent garage contractor, make sure they allow you to personally inspect jobs they have completed as well as what is under construction.

While I don't expect you to have an eye for solid construction practices, you can learn a lot by looking at the finished product carefully. Note the fine details, check the workings of doors and windows, look for level (bring a level with you if you have one) and other evidences of quality construction.

If they let you visit a job in progress, look for how clean or messy the site is. Look for safety shortcuts, like ladders that are too short. Do they use plywood or OSB? Are the studs plumb? Are the door and window headers level? Does it look like it's been slapped together or are they taking the time to do it right?

And if you can't get a good idea what's good and what's bad, take some pictures, and get closeup shots too, and post them here. We may be able to help that way too.

tony.g 06-23-2012 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JulieMor (Post 949716)





Do they use plywood or OSB?

Is there any significance in the choice of board?

CopperClad 06-23-2012 02:47 PM

You use whatever kind of plywood the plans call out for. Whether it be CDX , OSB, or any of the other wide array of plywoods used for buildings.

Bonzai 06-23-2012 02:57 PM

Make sure they are familiar with local building codes and understand the building permit process in your area. You should research in advance if you need a permit (ask your local building department). If the contractor says one is not needed ask them why ... They may be right, but they may also be trying to dodge having to do things properly.

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user1007 06-23-2012 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonzai (Post 949761)
Make sure they are familiar with local building codes and understand the building permit process in your area. You should research in advance if you need a permit (ask your local building department). If the contractor says one is not needed ask them why ... They may be right, but they may also be trying to dodge having to do things properly.

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And know what work you are allowed to do yourself. You may find, for example, that you are not able to do the electrical as it may require an electrician to sign-off.

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JulieMor 06-24-2012 04:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tony.g (Post 949736)
Is there any significance in the choice of board?

Sure, OSB is cheaper and provides less rigidity than the plywood. Some building codes do not allow OSB to be used as roof sheathing on spans over 16". The choice of materials used in the construction of a building do have an overall effect.

As far as building codes, they are minimums. Building only to those minimums... Well, you get the idea.

oh'mike 06-24-2012 06:32 AM

As you are just planning this future project---Start by tracking down an architect--draftsman/designer or engineer--

You will need plans for the permit and hand drawn plans may not get approved for an attached garage--


The designer will be able to suggest some contractors that have preformed well on other projects.

Just a thought----Also --the local lumber yard might be able to suggest a framing crew--as well as a concrete outfit.

Plans first--how can you even ask for help before you have the plans?


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