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-   -   new post foundation for home (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/new-post-foundation-home-60765/)

Dereck 01-01-2010 06:40 PM

new post foundation for home
 
I am located in southern illinois and getting ready to build a new home. We have chose the pole barn style and are looking for some input on post hole depth. We have a frost line approx 18-22". I have access to a auger that has a 18" bit and can drill 8'. Any suggestions on how deep and also how to set the poles, concrete,gravel, etc....thank you:thumbup:

Ron6519 01-01-2010 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dereck (Post 375009)
I am located in southern illinois and getting ready to build a new home. We have chose the pole barn style and are looking for some input on post hole depth. We have a frost line approx 18-22". I have access to a auger that has a 18" bit and can drill 8'. Any suggestions on how deep and also how to set the poles, concrete,gravel, etc....thank you:thumbup:

You might want to get some professional guidance with this project. Your region has building codes that will dictate minimum requirements. I can't see how you expect to build this, "off the cuff" with internet guidance.
An ill advised venture.
Ron

concretemasonry 01-01-2010 09:51 PM

Since it is a new home go as deep and wide as you can go since it is your best economical choice.

A pole barn is real challenge because of the lack of lateral resistance and movement. Any pole structure will move and you cannot replace the temporary wood posts (foundations/support) and have to rely on the connectors to the real foundation and the structure of the home. The "new improved" wood posts are not like the older old-growth wood, no matter what chemicals are used. Make sure you have a real plan for your investment and not just a "pretty" idea or concept.

If you are lucky, you might have access to getting a permit and inspections from an inspector that will protect you from yourself and the people you might hire, but not all inspectors are that good or dedicated.

Dick

pyper 01-02-2010 07:28 AM

Post construction has tremendous resistance to lateral movement if it's done right. A large post set into concrete is a lot more stable than a stud set on a block wall.

There are good books on residential pole construction (I found several at my library). The depth and size of the holes you need is based on the bearing capacity of your soil, the size and frequency of your posts, and the nature of the structure (static load). You can have it tested and size the holes accordingly, or you can look up hole sizes in tables based on soil type.

I agree you should follow an informed plan, but it's not rocket science. There are books that have engineering behind them that you can use as a reference. There's one in particular I like that has the plans for building two-stories using telephone style posts on a 12x12 grid. One of the neat things about post construction is there are no load bearing walls, so you can make really large openings.

Daniel Holzman 01-02-2010 09:50 AM

I agree with Pyper. Pole structures can be designed with widely variable spacing depending on pole diameter, material type, depth, and concrete jacket thickness (if you use concrete). Absolutely no way anyone on the internet can size or even suggest depth of hole without detailed knowledge of soil conditions. This is a case where hiring an engineer with local knowledge of soil conditions and pole barn building practice would be a very good idea, might save you some serious trouble later. but of course, this is a DIY site, so if you don't need a permit, and feel you can develop a good design from a book, its your party.


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