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-   -   New here, so move this as appropriate(foundation work) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/new-here-so-move-appropriate-foundation-work-2251/)

Alan 04-11-2006 07:47 PM

New here, so move this as appropriate(foundation work)
 
So the place i'm living in has 2 garages. One on the back of the house (south), and one on the west side of the house. The rear garage was enclosed before i purchased the property, and a deck was built onto the rear of the home, rendering the garage (even with a door) entirely useless as far as cars go.

What i'd LIKE to do is turn that back garage into a master bedroom with a utility/laundry room on the end of it. I am very well versed in most carpentry applications. Basic wall framing is a cinch, and if I don't know, I can usually figure it out.

The problem is this : Being that it was a garage, it has only three sides with 'raised foundations' (forgive my poor terminology). In order to bypass the concrete steps out into the room, and bring the floor up to the same level as the rest of the house, the 'drive-in' side of the garage needs to have a raised foundation on it as well. As it sits now, a mud sill in mud/water is simply rotting the wall away from the ground up, so its going to need to be replaced anyway.

Can I put a raised foundation on TOP of a slab ?

Obviously the slab had to be structurally sound enough by itself before, so as long as there is some way to attach the raised foundation to the slab, there shouldn't be any problems with doing this, right? (after tossing this around in my head today, what I came up with was some sort of cinder block setup with the bolts that hold the mud sill on drilled about 3 or 4 inches into the slab and then concreted into the cinder blocks.) This is just where my level of expertise falls a bit short. What is going to be involved in this project? Is this something I can do on my own or do I need to hire an expert to do it for me? Obviously the foundation is very important so I really don't want to screw this up. Any help you can offer would really be appreciated. Thanks :)

Darylh 04-11-2006 11:02 PM

i have a couple of questions before answering.
1- How high do you need to go
2- Is it just the area where you drive the car in another words one wall

doing block work can be a bit frustrating if you havent done it before and if its only one wall then it would not cost much to have it done.

Alan 04-11-2006 11:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darylh
i have a couple of questions before answering.
1- How high do you need to go
2- Is it just the area where you drive the car in another words one wall

doing block work can be a bit frustrating if you havent done it before and if its only one wall then it would not cost much to have it done.

just one wall.......... probably 18 inches or less. I'll have to measure to be certain.

Edit : 10 inches to the top of the concrete foundation.

Darylh 04-11-2006 11:17 PM

Here is what I would do
1st drill in anchor bolts every 2 feet
2- drill in 1 anchor bolt in the two esisting walls
3- tie a piece if rebar to your ancor bolts so the wall is tied in from each side
4-form up a 10" high x 4-6 Inch wide wall and pour concrete.
5- set in new ancors evey 2 feet.
This will take a lot less work and it will get you high enough off the ground and the concrete will match the rest of the house. Hope this helps

Alan 04-11-2006 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darylh
Here is what I would do
1st drill in anchor bolts every 2 feet
2- drill in 1 anchor bolt in the two esisting walls
3- tie a piece if rebar to your ancor bolts so the wall is tied in from each side
4-form up a 12" high x 4-6 Inch wide wall and pour concrete.
5- set in new ancors evey 2 feet.
This will take a lot less work and it will get you high enough off the ground of course you could form it up the 18 inches so the concrete matched the rest of the house. Hope this helps

See above ^^^^^ only needs to be 10 inches.

Next questions :
-Obviously normal concrete form with plywood, stakes etc on the outside where there is dirt, but what about on the inside where the slab is? Is there a good form building tutorial on this forum somewhere?

The part of the foundation that touches the house is 10 inches high. The other two walls that have raised foundation are only 4" high. Obviously it would be easier, but would it be cheaper to just use a thicker board on top of the mud sill instead of adding on to the concrete there or having it redone by a contractor? Would that be an acceptable solution by building standards?

Darylh 04-12-2006 08:11 AM

This is a tad bit confusing. Any way of posting some pics or a drawing of what we are discussing. Is there 8 inches of space between the top of the conrete and ground level or did they pour a 4 inch wall on top of the slab. You need to be 8 icnes off the ground so I I mentioned a picture would sure help out here or at least a drawing of what you have now.

Alan 04-12-2006 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darylh
This is a tad bit confusing. Any way of posting some pics or a drawing of what we are discussing. Is there 8 inches of space between the top of the conrete and ground level or did they pour a 4 inch wall on top of the slab. You need to be 8 icnes off the ground so I I mentioned a picture would sure help out here or at least a drawing of what you have now.

I can take pictures later tonight. I'm not sure if they actually poured a 4 inch wall on top of the slab or if that was originally incorporated. I realize that i'll need at least 8 inches of space under the floor, so thats why i'm asking about a thicker board on top of the mud sill. Or does the mud sill itself have to be 8 inches off of the ground ? I'll try to take some pictures tonight if i can clear some space out to do so.

Darylh 04-13-2006 07:21 AM

Any wood has to be 8 inches from soil, you could get away with six inches but not recomended. Typicly when foundations are done the footing goes in first at frost level then the walls go in so the top of the foundation wall is above 8" above ground then they fill in to the appropiate level between the walls and pour the garage floor, this is why you see a little bit of concrete protruding past the slab.
To me it sounds like you have 4 inches on the sides, and 10 inches at the house which is the main foundation for the house.
What I am having problems with understanding is what is there now as far as the walls go, are these mud sills close to the ground and this is what youre going to replace?
This by chance doesnt happen to be a carpot?
. As you can see I am a little confused and some pictures would probably clear this up.

Alan 04-13-2006 06:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darylh
Any wood has to be 8 inches from soil, you could get away with six inches but not recomended. Typicly when foundations are done the footing goes in first at frost level then the walls go in so the top of the foundation wall is above 8" above ground then they fill in to the appropiate level between the walls and pour the garage floor, this is why you see a little bit of concrete protruding past the slab.
To me it sounds like you have 4 inches on the sides, and 10 inches at the house which is the main foundation for the house.
What I am having problems with understanding is what is there now as far as the walls go, are these mud sills close to the ground and this is what youre going to replace?
This by chance doesnt happen to be a carpot?
. As you can see I am a little confused and some pictures would probably clear this up.

Sounds like you actually understand what i'm talkin about, but i've been sick w/ flu since yesterday at 5, so as soon as i feel up to moving around i'm going to take some pictures.

JasonRieke 04-20-2006 09:00 AM

Most garages will slope from the door opening up to the back of the garage about 4". If this is the case with your garage then your master bedroom will have a 4" slope to its floor.

After you figure out what you are doing with the problem area (rotted portion) I would put in some sleepers as floor joists so that you can level out the floor. This will also create a warmer feeling since you wont be standing on a concrete floor.

Alan 05-17-2006 09:01 PM

holy CRAP......... Took me long enough eh? Everything is so busy around here with a 12 month old and another baby due any day, i'm pulling my hair out by the roots!!!!!!!

Anyway, here we go with pictures...... links, and they're extra big (DIALUP BEWARE) to provide the most detail possible.

This picture shows the corner where the house part of the foundations meets the foundation built around the garage (also the crawlspace)

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0967.JPG

This picture is just to the left of the previous picture showing the measurement of the house part of the foundation.

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0968.JPG

This picture taken just to the RIGHT of the first picture shows the measurement of the foundation on the garage portion.

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0969.JPG

This picture (and the next one) shows the outside of the house where the last picture was taken. You can see where the foundation goes straight to boards laying on the slab.

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0970.JPG

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0971.JPG

Last but not least one more picture where you can compare the heights of the two foundations side by side. You can see where the house ends and the other foundation starts.

http://webpages.charter.net/mstanley...f/DSCF0974.JPG

I hope these help clear up any questions anyone had... If not, i can take more pictures in areas that would be of further help.

Thanks :) :) :)


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