Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-22-2009, 10:29 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Hello everyone - I'm in the process of planning a new 12 x 32 foot in the corner of our "L-shaped" ranch style home.

The land that I'm building the deck over is recessed by about 18 inches and the door that I want the deck built level too is about 23 inches from the ground. Due to the fact that the ground is recessed and the deck will essentially be level to the ground, one step down, how much do I need to worry about cross ventilation? There won't be much due to the layout of our property as I mentioned as the joists will essentially be level with the ground. I am using pre-treated lumber so I know it's not as much of a concern as if I was using composite, I was thinking that I could leave some of the corners open and lattice it 'closed', but I also have 3 children under 5 that I would worry about.

Also - for anyone in MA, I'm reading through the code book and don't see a lot of information on the floating foundation system that I'm planning on using. A lot of the documentation discussess anchoring the deck to the primary structure, but I'm not planning on doing that. It does say that if, during inspection the structure can't be verified that it needs to be self-supportive, but that is about it.

Also - does the code require that the ground be clean under a deck? I see it is required if the lumber is directly on the ground (which I'm not doing), so I just wanted to confirm. I don't want any surprises during the inspection!

Thanks in advance for all your help!

Keith

kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 10:37 AM   #2
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,271
Rewards Points: 2,120
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


I agree, you don't want any surprises during the inspection. So I suggest you visit the local code official well before you start the project with a plan and some photos showing the location, and a list of specific questions. The code official should be more than happy to discuss requirements and options with you.

Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 11:12 AM   #3
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Not really thinking there'd be too much problem with venelation. But I do think it is a shame to put a deck at ground level when you have the opportunity to design an attractive milti-level, or at least, stepped, deck. The interconnecting relationships of the rails, alone, can be an art form. And curved, full width steps... think about it. Elevated or opposingly sunken focal points and designated areas for the hot tub, fire pit, barbque, or just conversation benches are considerations not to be overlooked when you have a chance to incorporate some of them.

We're dead, level flat here in Florida. And all I can do is build up from the ground. You're always climbing to some part of the deck from the house exit. I'd give my dog for an elevated home................... Well...... my wife, anyway.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 11:29 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


I like what you are saying and it has made me think, but I've attached an old picture showing the area I'm talking about. If you look closely, from the end of the sidewalk to our front door, that area is briefly recessed due to the basement contruction that was added onto the house about 30 years ago. That is where I'm looking to build the deck. It currently isn't utilized since it's a relatively small area. My thoughts were that building a deck there would allow us to utilize the space much more than we currently do - also the increased value to the home played into my thinking.

Either way, I don't think there is too much we could do here, as far as a multi-level build is concerned although I guess we could have a lower level down on the right half, but that would pretty much be flat to the ground and would have no ventilation. Thoughts?
Attached Thumbnails
New Deck in Massachusetts-house.jpg  
kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 11:38 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


You could do a smaller deck on the left, then step down to a patio
on the right.
Any problems with water flow due to the recessed area?
Is so it shoudl be regraded before the deck goes down
Cement slab or do you have a basement?
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 11:41 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


No water issues at all.

Yes, full basement - finished on right and unfinished on left.

What would the benefit be of a patio vs. a deck? I am partial to having a full deck, but am curious as to why you'd recommend splitting the two.
kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 01:35 PM   #7
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Check your local Building Department. I would use 2x8 which span 12',on hangers off of beams at the ends instead of under. That way you'd only be down 9" or so, from the door. Be safe, G
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 01:44 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kestu View Post
No water issues at all.

Yes, full basement - finished on right and unfinished on left.

What would the benefit be of a patio vs. a deck? I am partial to having a full deck, but am curious as to why you'd recommend splitting the two.
Just an option
You are in a snow area - like me
So you should be stepping down 1 step to get out onto the deck
That will help prevent snow from piling up against the dsoor & melting & leaking into the house. Of course it won't help in the 18" storms we had this past winter. But it does help it from piling up, especially since this will be in a corner
Both of my decks step down 6-8"
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 01:52 PM   #9
Newbie Bill
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,056
Rewards Points: 500
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Any problems with water flow due to the recessed area?
Is so it shoudl be regraded before the deck goes down
Nice yard Kestu,

I agree with Dave. From the photo, it looks like the sidewalk and a portion of the yard all slope towards that recessed area by the house. My uneducated opinion is that it is just a matter of time before you have a water issue in the basement.

Since you will be building a deck anyway, this would be a good time to ensure the proper drainage away from the house.
drtbk4ever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 01:57 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Thanks Dave - it must be the angle from which the picture was taken, the driveway/sidewalk are all slanted away from the house. We are also up a slight hill as well, so we haven't had any issues.
kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 02:53 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Just an option
You are in a snow area - like me
So you should be stepping down 1 step to get out onto the deck
That will help prevent snow from piling up against the dsoor & melting & leaking into the house. Of course it won't help in the 18" storms we had this past winter. But it does help it from piling up, especially since this will be in a corner
Both of my decks step down 6-8"
Missed this response previously.

Thanks for the feedback - I hadn't thought about that. That is actually how it is setup now in the small little 'deck' we have now - I had thought building up would look better, but that is a good point. Thanks.
kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 02:57 PM   #12
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Something like this.........

I left a lot of the railings out so you could see more.

Use the <PAGE> feature on the toolbar to ZOOM this up to 200% for a bigger picture.
Attached Thumbnails
New Deck in Massachusetts-house-deck.jpg  
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 03:06 PM   #13
Newbie Bill
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,056
Rewards Points: 500
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Willie,

Nice design.

Hey Willie, did you use Chief Architect for that rendering? How long did that take you?
__________________
Bill

A DIY Noob that knows just enough to be dangerous.

Last edited by drtbk4ever; 05-22-2009 at 03:13 PM. Reason: typo
drtbk4ever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 03:08 PM   #14
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


Willie - that's great thanks. But I think I would need to step down out of the front door due to the feedback I got from Dave (due to the amount of snowfall we get).

I've also debated wrapping the deck around the side of the house on the right as well - the recessed land is about 7 feet wide, so I was debating wrapping it around, back another 20 feet or so, but that might be overkill??

Very cool though - thanks for the comments, definitely gives me some good ideas.
kestu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2009, 03:08 PM   #15
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

New Deck in Massachusetts


SketchUp About 15 - 20 minutes.

__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Building a new deck......suggestions? thoughts? Rhizzlebop Building & Construction 38 06-24-2009 06:07 PM
Post detail for raised covered deck jogr Building & Construction 3 05-16-2009 08:46 AM
Building a new deck....and creative uses of granite scrap in outdoor living space Rhizzlebop Building & Construction 9 05-15-2009 12:17 PM
The Bioswale, french drain, deck, drainage dilemma (long) seabright_sc Building & Construction 2 01-05-2008 04:37 PM
Roof used as a deck - what is a good approach rogersor Roofing/Siding 3 09-19-2007 02:05 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.