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Old 11-29-2007, 03:27 AM   #16
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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A small home dehumidifier is great, but what you need is circulation in the basement also. When mold remediation companies hit a house, they use huge dehumidifiers and fans to circulate air. What you also need to check is the HVAC system/air handler and the hot water heater for rust, and the ducting for mold.

If you want to spend the money, you may need to hire an environmental company to do a mold inspection and an air sample as part of your final home inspection.
We put the 50 pint dehumidifier with a kerosene forced air heater that heats upto 2700 sqft. That combined with several portable fans the basement is almost dry. BUT I'm going to ask the builder today about having it inspected for mold issues before we sign, if they wont we will. I definately have to read the 10 year warranty book to see if mold is an exclusion.

Thank you for all the advice!
Cyndi Lou

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Old 11-29-2007, 04:53 AM   #17
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


I'd consider installing a 5' deep french drain 10' within the boundary of your entire perimeter. Pipe your leaders and gutters and sump pump discharge to the french drain.

Keep in mind though, when a home is built a giant hole is dug, and after the foundation is complete the area goes through various stages of backfilling, settling, backfilling, etc. But all that disturbed clay soil around your foundation is probably serving as the "best" place for water to drain, right now.
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Old 11-29-2007, 07:25 AM   #18
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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We put the 50 pint dehumidifier with a kerosene forced air heater that heats upto 2700 sqft. That combined with several portable fans the basement is almost dry. BUT I'm going to ask the builder today about having it inspected for mold issues before we sign, if they wont we will. I definately have to read the 10 year warranty book to see if mold is an exclusion.

Thank you for all the advice!
Cyndi Lou
I'm surprised the builder would let you use that kerosene heater in the house. In case of fire, it would be their loss if you put that heater in the house. They could sue you if there's a fire and the house burns. Then, you'd be out of your money to get the house replaced, and then you won't have a house either.

I would not ask the builder to have the house inspected for mold. Instead, I would ask the builder to reimburse you for having a mold inspection done before settlement. If the builder pays outright, the mold inspector reports to the builder and the builder gets the results. If you pay, then the mold inspector is accountable to you.
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:11 AM   #19
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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I'm surprised the builder would let you use that kerosene heater in the house. In case of fire, it would be their loss if you put that heater in the house. They could sue you if there's a fire and the house burns. Then, you'd be out of your money to get the house replaced, and then you won't have a house either.

I would not ask the builder to have the house inspected for mold. Instead, I would ask the builder to reimburse you for having a mold inspection done before settlement. If the builder pays outright, the mold inspector reports to the builder and the builder gets the results. If you pay, then the mold inspector is accountable to you.
House is full insured for any issues thru our insurance. That was done day one before they broke ground. If it would burn to the ground we are covered completely. That much I can be positive of, I'm a nut about proper insurance coverage and we have a builders risk insurance. The kerosene heater is the same unit their own workers were using, except we purchase one new this past weekend.

Another good idea on the mold issue - the things I'm learning about building a home is just amazing. There are tons of things you are prepared for then the things you never though you would have to deal with or educate yourself about happen. No book can prepare you enough.
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:22 AM   #20
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


Stop using that kerosene heater. It puts out boatloads of humidity! When you burn kerosene the primary output is water and carbon dioxide. The heater is working against the dehumidifier!

Use electric for heat.
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Old 11-29-2007, 07:13 PM   #21
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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Stop using that kerosene heater. It puts out boatloads of humidity! When you burn kerosene the primary output is water and carbon dioxide. The heater is working against the dehumidifier!

Use electric for heat.
Well that is a problem since the power isn't hooked up to the furnace yet and the gas line doesn't go in until Monday. I can't imagine heating a house this size by electric heaters.
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Old 11-30-2007, 07:12 AM   #22
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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Well that is a problem since the power isn't hooked up to the furnace yet and the gas line doesn't go in until Monday. I can't imagine heating a house this size by electric heaters.

How about propane? That's what most builders use when the house is dry walled or painted during the winter. I've seen 100 gallon tanks at costco.
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Old 11-30-2007, 08:52 AM   #23
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


Propane is just as bad as kerosene if not worse because you do not notice it. Any unvented heater will just warm the air and pump out moisture than can condense on cold surfaces.

I was called in on a $900,000 law suit where the concrete moisture, drywall compound and heated pumped enough water in to the house for a major mold problem (removed drywall, killed mold, removed drywall again and then sued).

I don't know if your situation is as bad as you say, but you can always use a generator to run your furnace and get more and better heat AND drying.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:16 AM   #24
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Propane is just as bad as kerosene if not worse because you do not notice it. Any unvented heater will just warm the air and pump out moisture than can condense on cold surfaces.

I was called in on a $900,000 law suit where the concrete moisture, drywall compound and heated pumped enough water in to the house for a major mold problem (removed drywall, killed mold, removed drywall again and then sued).

I don't know if your situation is as bad as you say, but you can always use a generator to run your furnace and get more and better heat AND drying.
Can't leave a generator unmonitored or overnight. It'll either get stolen or pulverized by annoyed neighbors.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:03 AM   #25
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


Around here(WI) i've actually seen drywallers leave a propane heater run over night to help the mud dry. If propane heaters put out humidity wouldn't this make the mud drying time longer? Not starting an arguement cause i don't know, just currious! Thanks
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:24 AM   #26
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


Guys, there's already plenty of electric power at the house. A little heat from electric heaters in the basement would help the dehumidifier rather than hinder it.

Cyndi, You don't need to heat the whole house to 80. Just put a couple 1500 watt 110 volt electric heaters in the basement to get the chill off and help the dehumidifier. A couple good fans will help too. You've already pumped the water out right?
Once the gas is hooked up Monday you'll have plenty of dry heat. Just be careful to keep good air filters in your furnace during construction.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:38 AM   #27
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


ponch -

You are right about drying drywall compound. What happens is that the propane heater heats the air, which allows it to dry out the drywall compound AS LONG AS the humidity does not get too high. I am sure you notice the high humidity when this happens.

If you have a lot of extra humidity from water and concrete (usually in the lower levels), the humidity from the heater can reduce the rate of drying and the only parts of the house that do dry are the warmer, upper areas and not the lower cooler areas.
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Old 11-30-2007, 11:09 AM   #28
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


Cyndi, how did you insure a house w/o a C of O? What kind of insurance is it? Is the builder insured? (Construction insurance) Did you hire this builder to build you a house on your land, or is this a new subdivision or offering from a builder on speculation?
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Old 11-30-2007, 06:06 PM   #29
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Propane is just as bad as kerosene if not worse because you do not notice it. Any unvented heater will just warm the air and pump out moisture than can condense on cold surfaces.

I don't know if your situation is as bad as you say, but you can always use a generator to run your furnace and get more and better heat AND drying.
We have opened a window in each room on the second floor about an inch - we have the kerosene heater, which is forced air one, set at a low setting, the house is a bout 50 degrees inside right now. We pumped the water out of the basement, put fans in the basement along as one on the steps going up to help circulate the air. I was there this morning for the appliances to be delivered and there is no longer any moisture on the window seals. Basement is dry other than it looks to be damp on the bottom of the walls, but the floor is dry. I'm assuming it's going to take a while for that to dry out, maybe until the furnace is hooked up. My husband who was a commercial carpenter for 12 years was concerned about the moisture it was going to cause in the house from the get go. He was the one that said to make sure to keep the windows open so the moisture has a way to get out.
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Old 11-30-2007, 06:08 PM   #30
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New Construction - under roof and water in basement


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Around here(WI) i've actually seen drywallers leave a propane heater run over night to help the mud dry. If propane heaters put out humidity wouldn't this make the mud drying time longer? Not starting an arguement cause i don't know, just currious! Thanks
That's the exact reason we purchased a kerosene heater (forced air model) because the drywallers had that running to keep the house warm. We also approved that with our builder before putting the unit in.

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